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School-Family-Community Partnerships: Partnerships are Influential presented by Tanya Braden, Ed.S. State Support Team Region 1 Lynn McKahan, M.S., Director.

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Presentation on theme: "School-Family-Community Partnerships: Partnerships are Influential presented by Tanya Braden, Ed.S. State Support Team Region 1 Lynn McKahan, M.S., Director."— Presentation transcript:

1 School-Family-Community Partnerships: Partnerships are Influential presented by Tanya Braden, Ed.S. State Support Team Region 1 Lynn McKahan, M.S., Director 2275 Collingwood Boulevard, Suite C, Toledo, Ohio [fax]

2 PARENT PROFESSIONAL PARTNERSHIPS “Partnerships = relationships in which families and professionals build on each others’ expertise and resources for the purpose of making and implementing decisions that will directly benefit students and indirectly benefit the parents and professionals” (Turnbull et al., 2011, p. 107).

3 The Importance of Parent Professional Partnerships “The evidence is now beyond dispute. When schools and families work together to support learning, children tend to succeed not just in school but also throughout life.” (Henderson & Berla, 1997)

4 Everyone wants CHILDREN to be HEALTHY and SUCCESSFUL STUDENTS

5 PARENT PROFESSIONAL PARTNERSHIPS NCLB: The law now says that parents are to be "afforded substantial and meaningful opportunities to participate in the education of their children." (Title I, Sec (12)) IDEA 2004: Parents as EQUAL partners in every aspect of their child’s education - federal regulations clearly define parent involvement in the special education process

6 PARENT PROFESSIONAL PARTNERSHIPS OHIO: State Board of Education -  Parent and Family Involvement Policy (7/07)  Early Learning Program Guidelines  Ohio Improvement Process  Special Education Process

7 Academic Results Intellectual Development Achievement Annual promotion and on-time high school graduation Physical Health Good Nutrition, Exercise Prevention of alcohol, tobacco, and drug use/abuse Good Attendance Emotional Growth Positive attitudes about school, Self Concept, Good Behavior, Positive Relationships with peers, friends, family, teachers Appreciation of others PARENT PROFESSIONAL PARTNERSHIPS ENHANCE:

8 Benefits of Partnerships: Results of Research For Students Higher grades and test scores Better attendance Improved behavior at home and at school Better social skills and adjustment to school More classes passed and credits earned Increased enrollment in more challenging academic programs and graduation on time

9 Benefits of Partnerships: Results of Research For Parents Stronger sense of support from school and other parents More awareness of student progress and effective responses to problems Increased self confidence about guiding student through school Appreciation of teachers’ work and skills Increased feeling of ownership of school

10 Benefits of Partnerships: Results of Research For Teachers Increased respect for families’ strengths and efforts Increased understanding of families goals for their children Greater readiness to involve all families in new ways Use of community resources to enrich students’ experiences Increased satisfaction with teaching

11 WHAT DO WE KNOW from U.S. and International Studies of Family and Community Involvement? Parents vary in how much they presently are involved. Parents are concerned about their children’s success in school. Students need multiple sources of support to succeed in school and in life. Schools must reach out in order to involve all families. Some teachers and administrators are initially resistant to increasing family involvement

12 WHAT DO WE KNOW from U.S. and International Studies of Family and Community Involvement? Teachers and administrators in schools and districts need inservice, preservice, and advanced education on partnerships. Subject-specific practices involve families in ways that directly assist students’ learning and success. Partnership programs are most effective if they are research-based, customized for each community, evaluated, and continually improved to help meet important goals for students.

13 Effective family engagement is a set of INTENDED day-to-day practices, attitudes, beliefs and interactions which support learning at home, at school, afterschool and during the summer. To ensure that the students of today are ready for the careers of tomorrow, families, schools, and community groups need to work together to promote engagement that is systemic, sustained, and integrated into school improvement efforts. Source: Harvard Family Research Project school-and-community-engagement-webinar-series WHAT DO WE KNOW from U.S. and International Studies of Family and Community Involvement?

14 PARENT PROFESSIONAL PARTNERSHIPS

15 7 PRINCIPLES OF PARTNERSHIPS Communication: friendly, listen, clear, honest, informative Professional Competence: quality education, high expectations, continue to learn Respect: cultural diversity, affirm strengths, treat with dignity Trust: reliable, sound judgment, maintain confidentiality, trust yourself Commitment: sensitive to other needs, be available and accessible, go “above and beyond” Equality: share power, foster empowerment, provide options Advocacy: prevent problems, pinpoint and document problems, form alliances, seek solutions Turnbull, A., Turnbull, R., Erwin, E., & Soodak, L. (2006). Families, Professionals, and Exceptionality: Positive Outcomes Through Partnerships and Trust, 5 th Ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill/Prentice Hall.

16 PARTNERSHIPS STAFF - Points to consider Let them see you as a person, too – from a family / with a family Let them know how your experiences can help them / their child Build on your students’ and their families’ vision for the future Prove your commitment Trust them as parents doing the best to their ability Provide a school resource contact Student focused discussions / meetings Focus on solutions, not problems Be honest when you don’t have the knowledge – seek out

17 Communication Professional Competence Commitment Advocacy EqualityRespect Trust

18 PARTNERSHIPS STAFF - Questions to consider  What are my beliefs about how families, schools and communities support learning?  What is my role as a family, school, or community member to support children’s school success?  What are my expectations of others?

19 Framework of Six Types of Parent Involvement

20 THE KEYS TO SUCCESSFUL SCHOOL -FAMILY-COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS EPSTEIN’S SIX TYPES OF INVOLVEMENT Type 1Type 2Type 3Type 4Type 5Type 6 PARENTING: Assist families in understanding child and adolescent development, and in setting home conditions that support children as students at each age and grade level. Assist schools in understanding families. COMMUNICATING: Communicate with families about school programs and student progress through effective school-to-home and home-to- school communications. VOLUNTEERING: Improve recruitment, training, work, and schedules to involve families as volunteers and audiences at school or in other locations to support students and school programs. LEARNING AT HOME: Involve families with their children in learning activities at home, including homework, other curriculum- related activities, and individual course and program decisions. DECISION MAKING: Include families as participants in school decisions, governance, and advocacy through PTA/PTO, school councils, committees, action teams, and other parent organizations. COLLABORATING WITH COMMUNITY: Coordinate resources and services for students, families, and the school with businesses, agencies, and other groups, and provide services to the community.

21 PARENTING: Basic Responsibilities of Families Assist families in understanding child and adolescent development, and in setting home conditions that support children as students at each age and grade level. Assist schools in understanding families. Housing, health, nutrition, clothing, safety Understand child and adolescent development and parenting skills for all age levels Home conditions that support children as students at all grade levels Information and activities to help schools understand children and families Type 1

22 COMMUNICATING: Basic Responsibilities of Schools Communicate with families about school programs and student progress through effective school-to-home and home-to-school communications. Type 2 SCHOOL-TO-HOME Memos, notices, report cards, conferences, newsletters, phone calls, computerized messages, s, Web sites Information to help families Understand school programs and children’s progress Understand state tests, report cards, and other assessments Choose or change schools Choose or change courses, placements, programs, and activities HOME-TO-SCHOOL Two-way channels of communication for questions, suggestions, and interactions

23 Your Challenge Type 2 - COMMUNICATING Make all memos, notices, and other print and non-print communications clear and understandable for ALL families. Obtain ideas from families to improve the design and content of communications such as newsletters, report cards, and conference schedules. Establish easy-to-use two-way channels for communications from school to home and from home to school. Redefinitions “Communications about school programs and student progress” go not only from school to home, but also from home to school, and within the community.

24 VOLUNTEERING: Involvement at and for the School Improve recruitment, training, work, and schedules to involve families as volunteers and audiences at school or in other locations to support students and school programs. Type 3 VOLUNTEERS Assist administrators, teachers, students, or parents as aides, tutors, coaches, boosters, monitors, lecturers, chaperones, mentors, or in other ways Assist school programs and student activities from any location at any time AUDIENCES Attend assemblies, performances, sports events, recognition, and award ceremonies, celebrations, and other student activities

25 Your Challenge Type 3 - VOLUNTEERING Recruit widely for volunteers so that all families know that their time and talents are welcome. Make flexible schedules for volunteers, assemblies, and events to enable working parents to participate. Provide training for volunteers, and match time and talent with school needs. Recognize volunteers and audiences for their support and assistance at school and in other locations Redefinitions “Volunteer” not only means someone who comes to school during the day, but also anyone who supports school goals and children’s learning and development in any way, at any place, and at any time.

26 LEARNING AT HOME: Involvement in Academic Activities Involve families with their children in learning activities at home, including homework, other curriculum-related activities, and individual course and program decisions. Type 4 INFORMATION FOR FAMILIES ON… How to help at home with homework Required skills to pass each subject Curriculum-related decisions by and for the student Development of students’ other skills and talents

27 Your Challenge Type 4 - LEARNING AT HOME Design and implement interactive homework on a regular schedule that guides students to discuss classwork, demonstrate skills, and share ideas with their families. Involve families and their children in important curriculum-related decisions in a timely way. Redefinitions “Homework” not only means work that students do alone, but also interactive activities that students discuss with others at home, linking schoolwork to real life. “Help” at home means how families encourage, listen, praise, guide, and discuss schoolwork with their children, not whether or how they “teach” school subjects.

28 DECISION MAKING: Participation and Leadership Include families as participants in school decisions, governance, and advocacy through PTA/PTO, school councils, committees, action teams, and other parent organizations. Type 5 School Council or School Improvement Team Action Team for Partnerships PTA/PTO membership, participation, leadership, representation Title I advisory and other school or district committees Independent advisory and advocacy groups

29 Your Challenge Type 5 - DECISION MAKING Include parent leaders from all racial, ethnic, linguistic, socioeconomic, and other major groups on councils teams, and committees. Offer training for parent leaders to develop leadership skills and to represent other families. Include student representatives along with parents on decision-making committees in high schools. Redefinitions “Decision making” means a process of partnership – sharing views, solving problems, and taking action toward shared goals, not an endless power struggle. Parent “leader” means a representative who shares information with and obtains ideas from other families, not just a parent who attends school meetings.

30 COLLABORATING WITH COMMUNITY: Coordinate resources and services for students, families, and the school with businesses, agencies, and other groups, and provide services to the community. Type 6 Community contributes to schools, students, and families Business partners Cultural and recreational groups Health services Senior citizen organizations Faith-based organizations Government and military agencies Other groups, agencies, and organizations Schools, students, and families to contribute to the community Service learning and other special projects

31 Your Challenge Type 6 - COLLABORATING WITH THE COMMUNITY Prevent or solve problems among partners of turf, goals, responsibilities, and funds. Inform all families and students about community programs and ensure equal opportunities for participation and services. Redefinitions “Community” is rated not only on low or high social or economic qualities, but also on the strengths and talents of individuals and groups who may support students, families, and schools. “Community” includes not only families with children in the schools, but also others who are interested in children’s success and who are affected by the quality of education.

32 Type 1 – Parenting Students improve when families are provided information on child development and school expectations at each grade level (e.g., to support student health, behavior, attendance). Type 2 – Communicating Students Increase awareness of their own progress in subjects and skills when teachers, students, and parents communicate about class work. Type 3 – Volunteering Students gain academic skills that are tutored or taught by volunteers. Type 4 – Learning At Home Students complete more homework in specific subjects when teachers guide parents in how to interact on assignments. Type 5 – Decision Making Students benefit from policies and projects conducted and supported by parent organizations and partnership teams. Type 6 – Collaborating with the Community Students gain skills and talents in curricular, extra-curricular, and afterschool projects with community partners. Studies show that each type of involvement promotes different kinds of results.

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34 34 EXAMPLES for a One-Year Action Plan to CREATE A CLIMATE OF PARTNERSHIPS TYPE 1 Parent support groups to discuss parenting approaches and school issues with other families and with school counselors TYPE 2 “Good news” postcards, phone calls, and other two-way communications (e.g., , voice mail, Web sites) to connect teachers and families about student progress and success TYPE 3 Volunteers for safe schools to greet, assist, or deter visitors TYPE 4 Quarterly interactive homework assignments for students to review report card grades with family partners and to discuss academic and behavior goals for the next grading period PTA/PTO-sponsored “Showcase the School Day” with booths and displays on school programs, student clubs, academic departments, the parent association, and partnership activities TYPE 5 Periodic community forums for educators, students, parents, and citizens to discuss school improvement topics, family and community support for education, and other education issues TYPE 6 …AND MANY OTHER IDEAS FOR EACH TYPE OF INVOLVEMENT PARTNERSHIP GOAL

35 “Coming together is a beginning, staying together is progress, & working together is success.“ Henry Ford RELATIONSHIPS

36 Q and A What questions do you have about GETTING STARTED and MOVING FORWARD with YOUR process of school, family, and community relationships ?

37 IDEA Part-B Funds Disclosure Statement There are no copyright restrictions on this document/product/software; however, please cite and credit the source when copying all or part of this document/product/software. This document/product/software was supported in whole or in part by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs, (Award #H027A130158, CFDA A, awarded to the Ohio Department of Education). The opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the policy or position of the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs, and no official endorsement by the Department should be inferred.


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