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The Individualized Education Program (IEP) PR - 07 Special Education Department 05-06 School Year.

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Presentation on theme: "The Individualized Education Program (IEP) PR - 07 Special Education Department 05-06 School Year."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Individualized Education Program (IEP) PR - 07 Special Education Department School Year

2 Re-energizing the IEP Process it is specially designed instruction Special Education is not a place--

3 Training Goal uProvide information on developing IEP documents in a sequential, systematic, and individualized manner, based on best practice

4 Vision Statement If parent/guardians attend the meeting, ask them their vision for the student in his/her school and community. Everyone has dreams for the future which guide their actions, thoughts and plans. Family and student preferences and interests are an essential part of the vision process. What goals do they have for the future? DO NOT LEAVE THIS SECTION BLANK! Note: “Vision” is not an area subject to due process.

5 STEP 1: Discuss Vision/Future Planning 4Does the vision describe long range plans for the student? 4Does the vision reflect the student/family’s hopes for the student’s future? 4Does the vision provide a focus for prioritizing student’s needs?

6 This should be a statement of the child’s present levels of academic achievement and functional performance, including how the child’s disability affects the child’s involvement and progress in the general education curriculum. 1)Provide levels of academic achievement in the content areas with the student’s skill level and peer grade level performance. 2)Provide the foundation (support) for identifying needs, developing goals, and determining services. 3)Include how the disability has an impact on the progress (achievement and performance) in the general education curriculum. 4)Provide specific levels of academic and functional performance (with multiple forms of evidence) in areas of need within the general curriculum. 5)Provide current evaluation information that is time referenced (either by date or by time period i.e. recent, last month)-Can include recent Terra Nova and Ohio Achievement Test results 6)Information presented should be understandable to all IEP team members, avoiding statistics and acronyms. 7)Include strengths to encourage the team to build on identified strengths when establishing goals and setting criteria. If the student receives any related services, information from the related service provider(s) must be included here!!

7 FORMAL Intellectual Assessments Social/Adaptive Behavior Scales Behavior Inventories Speech-Language Assessments Vocational Aptitude Tests Career Interest Inventories Health, Medical (e.g. vision, hearing) Motor Functioning Evaluations Outside consultative reports State and District-wide Assessments STEP 2: Discuss Present Levels Of Performance

8 Parent Inventory Home visits Functional Behavior Assessment Family Interview Learning Style/Modality Report Cards Current IEP/Progress Report Portfolios Attendance Information Samples of Student Work Teacher Grade Book/Records Observations-Classroom, Community, Home, Work Descriptions/data from modifications, interventions Office referrals Student-centered planning tools Student Surveys/Interviews INFORMAL STEP 2: Discuss Present Levels Of Performance

9 A statement of the child’s present levels of academic achievement and functional performance, including how the child’s disability affects the child’s involvement and progress in the general ed. curriculum Step 2: Examples T.J. is a pleasant young man. T.J. is interested in animals and volunteers at a local veterinarian’s office. He assists in exercising the dogs, cleaning cages and feeding animals. He also enjoys watching movies, playing games on the computer and skateboarding. T.J. took the Ohio Proficiency Test in fourth grade with allowable accommodations. He scored “below basic” in reading. T.J. does not like to read and refuses to complete reading assignments. He has a reduced spelling list and is able to correctly spell three out of the five words on his list. T.J. has been identified as having a disability in the area of reading. T.J.’s word analysis skills are limited to the identification of words containing one syllable. This impacts his ability to read with fluency and comprehension. When give a 115-word passage at the fifth grade level in April, T.J. read only 29 words compared to an average of 109 words per minute by peers. T.J. uses context cues to gain meaning. T.J. needs visual cues and prompts for spelling when writing. This has implications for T.J.’s learning in other content areas. T.J. has average to above average potential. He reads independently from below grade-level material. He is only able to answer basic fact questions after reading a passage. He has particular difficulties with decoding and word analysis. T.J. does not do well in Social Studies and Science, because of all of the reading required.

10 Step 2: IEP Inter-rater Agreement Tool Rationale Example # 2 is compliant and strategically designed to improve student performance because it: 1.Provides levels of academic achievement (the academic content area with the students skill level and peer grade level performance). 2.Provides the foundation (support) for identifying needs, developing goals and determining services. 3.Includes how the disability has an impact on progress (achievement and performance) in the general education curriculum. 4.Provides specific levels of academic and functional performance (with multiple forms of evidence) in areas of need within the general education curriculum. 5.Provides current evaluation information that is time referenced (either by date or by time period [e.g., recent, last month]). 6.Is understandable to all IEP team members (avoids statistics and acronyms).

11 In developing each child’s IEP, the IEP Team shall consider the strengths of the child. Examples Supporting Details: No strengths were included in the present levels of academic and functional performance. The following statement was included in the present levels of performance. T. J. works well when items are read to him. Supporting Details: Consideration of the strengths of the child is a critical element when determining how the student’s disability affects involvement and progress in the general education curriculum. The following statement was included in the present levels of performance. When the teacher orally reads grade level passages to T.J., he is able to answer all of the questions about the passages. T.J. is able to complete work involving reading when the reading material is supported by visuals. Supporting Details: Consideration of the strengths of the child is a critical element when determining how the student’s disability affects involvement and progress in the general education curriculum.

12 Step 2: IEP Inter-rater Agreement Tool Rationale Example # 3 is compliant and strategically designed to improve student performance for the following reasons. Including strengths within present levels of performance provides a basis for identifying needs and encourages the team to build on identified strengths when establishing goals and setting rigorous targets.

13 In developing each child’s IEP, the IEP team shall consider the results of the initial evaluation or most recent evaluation of the child Examples The following statement was included in the present levels of performance. During a classroom-based assessment given in April, T.J. was able to sound out individual phonemes (13 of 20). Errors included sound additions and substitutions, reversals (b for d) and long /u/ for short /u/. Supporting Details: Consideration of evaluation results is a critical element when determining how the child’s disability affects the child’s involvement and progress in the general education curriculum. Supporting Details: no evaluation results were included in the present levels of academic and functional performance. The following statement was included in the present levels of performance. T.J. took the Ohio Proficiency Test in fourth grade with allowable accommodations. He scored “below basic” in reading. Supporting Details: Consideration of evaluation results is a critical element when determining how the child’s disability affects the child’s involvement and progress in the general education curriculum.

14 Step 2: IEP Inter-rater Agreement Tool Rationale Example # 1 is compliant and strategically designed to improve student performance for the following reasons: 1.Including the results of the initial evaluation or most recent evaluation of the child within present levels of performance provides the baseline data that is critical to identifying needs, developing goals and determining services. 2.Baseline data from assessments provides direction for establishing goals and setting rigorous targets. 3.Avoiding statistics and acronyms helps all IEP team members understand the data.

15 This is the “starting point” for instruction, based upon the vision statement and present levels of performance (Steps 1 and 2) What will the student need to learn/do in order to make progress in the general education curriculum?

16 STEP 3: Identify Needs That Require Specially Designed Instruction Current functioning and individual needs in consideration of: the results of the initial or most recent evaluation, the student’s strengths, the concerns of the parents, the results of the student’s performance on any State or districtwide assessment programs; the student’s needs related to communication, behavior, use of Braille, assistive technology, limited English proficiency; how the student’s disability affects involvement and progress in the general curriculum; and the student’s needs as they relate to transition from school to post-school activities for students beginning with the first IEP to be in effect when the student turns age 16 (and younger if deemed appropriate). Academic Achievement, Functional Performance and Learning Characteristics: Current levels of knowledge and development in subject and skill areas, including activities of daily living, level of intellectual functioning, adaptive behavior, expected rate of progress in acquiring skills and information and learning style.

17 STEP 3: Identify Needs That Require Specially Designed Instruction (cont.) Social Development: The degree and quality of the student’s relationships with peers and adults, feelings about self and social adjustment to school and community environments. Physical Development: The degree or quality of the student’s motor and sensory development, health, vitality and physical skills or limitations that pertain to the learning process. Management Needs: The nature of and degree to which environmental modifications and human or material resources are required to enable the student to benefit from instruction. Management needs are determined in accordance with the factors identified in the areas of academic achievement, functional performance and learning characteristics, social development and physical development.

18 STEP 4: Identify Measurable Annual Goals, Benchmark or Short-Term Objectives, And Statement of Student Progress GOALS Each goal must be measurable. Number each goal and include criteria (% accuracy expected, # correct / # opportunities, times daily/per period, etc.). CONTENT AREA ADDRESSED Using the Academic Content Standards as a reference, select age/and or grade-appropriate annual goals relevant to each content area, and which will be needed for making progress in the general education curriculum. BENCHMARKS OR SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES 1a) List the measurable intermediate steps needed to reach the annual goal. These should be in a logical, developmentally appropriate order and again have a relationship with both the annual goal, identified needs, and present levels of performance.

19 STEP 4: Identify Measurable Annual Goals, Benchmark or Short-Term Objectives, And Statement of Student Progress (cont.) STATEMENT OF STUDENT PROGRESS Include how the child’s progress towards annual goals will be measured and how the parents will be informed of the extent to which the child’s progress is sufficient to enable him/her to achieve the goals by the end of the year. How? Will be measured through: Pre/post testing, teacher review of student work samples, charting/documentation of behavior Who will measure? Teacher, instructional staff, etc. When? Daily/Weekly/Quarterly Parents will be informed of progress through quarterly reports.

20 A statement of measurable annual goals, including academic and functional goals, designed to meet the child’s needs that result from the child’s disability to enable the child to be involved in and make progress in the general ed. curriculum Step 4: Examples Given one-minute sixth grade reading fluency probes, T.J. will increase his reading fluency by two words a minute each week, reaching a rate of 100 words per minute by the end of the school year. Supporting Details: Present levels of performance contains baseline data related to T.J.’s reading fluency (29 wpm). T.J. will improve his reading fluency. Supporting Details: Present levels of performance contain baseline data related to T.J.’s reading fluency (29 wpm). T.J. will analyze and decode words found in sixth grade materials with at least 60% accuracy. Supporting Details: Present levels of performance contain baseline data related to T.J.’s reading fluency (29 wpm).

21 Step 4: IEP Inter-rater Agreement Tool Rationale Example # 1 is compliant and strategically designed to improve student performance because it: 1.Addresses the student’s needs that result from the disability. 2.Provides access to the general education curriculum. 3.Contains a measurable and observable skill (uses an action verb). 4.Is supported by baseline data from the present levels (the goal and present levels use the same unit of measure – in this case ‘words per minute’). 5.States specifically what/how the student will do the action. 6.Sets expectations for levels of academic and functional achievement in one year. Achieving this goal would enable the student to make progress in the general education curriculum. 7.States how the goal will be measured. In addition, this goal is 1.Relevant to achieving future plans (this is likely to appear in Step 1 ‘Discuss future planning’ on the IEP form). 2.Understandable to all IEP team members.

22 Develop goals and objectives, then determine services to support the student Integrate services into goals and objectives Have related service personnel provide services in a variety of settings Make decisions about intensity and frequency of services based on student needs Provide supports for school personnel when needed

23 A statement of the special education and related services and supplementary aids and services, based on peer reviewed research to the extent practicable, to be provided to the child, or on behalf of the child, and a statement of the program modifications be supports for school personnel that will be provided for the child. Step 5: Examples Service: Learning Disability Accommodation: Tests read aloud and audiotapes provided, as needed. Supporting Details: The goal related to these services is: Given one-minute sixth-grade reading fluency probes, T.J. will increase his reading fluency by two words a minute each week, reaching a rate of 100 words per minute by the end of the school year. Service: Direct instruction in basic reading skills The special education teacher will provide direct instruction in basic reading skills that includes phonics, vocabulary, and comprehension instruction and guided repeated oral reading practice. The general education teacher will reinforce fluency development by providing opportunities for paired reading in all academic content areas. Tests containing reading passages and multiple choice items need to be read to T.J. Content from large reading passages will be presented using graphic organizers. T.J. will have access to audiotapes of required reading. T.J. may clarify answers to test questions with oral or visual responses. Supporting Details: The goal related to these services is: Given one-minute sixth-grade reading fluency probes, T.J. will increase his reading fluency by two words a minute each week, reaching a rate of 100 words per minute by the end of the school year. Service: Specially-designed instruction Accommodations in all settings: Read tests Provide audiotapes of textbooks Provide graphic organizers Supporting Details: The goal related to these services is: Given one- minute sixth-grade reading fluency probes, T.J. will increase his reading fluency by two words a minute each week, reaching a rate of 100 words per minute by the end of the school year.

24 Step 5: IEP Inter-rater Agreement Tool Rationale Example # 2 is compliant and strategically designed to improve student performance for the following reasons: 1.The service is specially designed. 2.The kind or type of service is clearly identified. 3.Structures and practices are evident that will enable the student to reach goals. 4.The delivery of instruction is defined. 5.It considers the student’s approaches to learning. 6.It clearly specifies how general education teachers will carry out accommodations. Additional considerations: 1.When a related service is included, the support clearly assists the student to benefit from special education. 2.The IEP may include any necessary training for staff or parents to implement specialized services.

25 STEP 6: Determine Least Restrictive Environment An explanation of the extent, if any, to which the child will not participate with nondisabled children in the regular classroom. Rationale: 1.Shows evidence of need for instruction OUTSIDE of the general education setting. If these specifics are not provided, it is impossible to determine whether additional supports and services may enable the student to receive instruction in the general education setting. 2.Establishes a framework for support needed for the student to make progress in the general education curriculum. 3.Establishes a link between the setting and the service the student will receive.

26 An explanation of the extent, if any, to which the child will not participate with nondisabled children in the regular class and in extracurricular activities. Step 6: Examples Step 6: Determine least restrictive environment. Resource room where a small class size and limited distractions provide the opportunity for intensive, direct instruction and guided practice. Supporting Details: The IEP indicates the service is specially designed instruction. Frequency: 20 minutes of direct intervention per day during the student’s language arts block. Step 6: Determine least restrictive environment. Resource room, due to the need for specialized instruction. Supporting Details: The IEP indicates the service is specially designed instruction. Frequency: 20 minutes of direct intervention per day during the student’s language arts block. Step 6: Determine least restrictive environment. Resource room. Supporting Details: The IEP indicates the service is specially designed instruction. Frequency: 20 minutes direct intervention per day during the student’s language arts block.

27 Step 6: IEP Inter-rater Agreement Tool Rationale Example # 1 is compliant and strategically designed to improve student performance for the following reasons: 1.There is evidence of criteria for determining the need for instruction outside the general education setting. 2.The statement establishes a framework for support needed for the student to make progress in the general education curriculum. 3.The statement establishes a link between the setting and the service the student will receive.

28 Special Factors When should the student’s behavior be addressed as part of the IEP?.Documented evidence that the student’s behavior interferes with his/her learning or the learning of others.Student’s behavior is one of the primary reasons he or she was referred for an MFE.Previous behavioral interventions were attempted and documented.Student’s specialized instruction includes techniques that have the potential for being misused

29 Special Factors When should the student’s behavior be addressed as part of the IEP? (con’t.) Student demonstrates behaviors that are unsafe to him/herself or others Student has been removed from general education environment as a result of his/her behavior Student has knowingly been in possession or used illegal drugs or solicited the sale of a controlled substance while at a school or at a school sponsored activity. Student has carried or been in possession of a weapon while at school or at a school sponsored activity

30 Consideration of special factors: The IEP Team shall, in the case of a child whose behavior impedes the child’s learning or that of others, consider the use of positive behavioral interventions and supports, and other strategies, to address that behavior Special Factors: Examples The following goal is evidence that behavior is addressed in the body of the IEP: In three out of four situations, Sam will discuss the steps that lead to verbal conflict and engage in problem solving activities that reduce verbal conflict with peers during group activities in academic settings. Supporting Details: Behavior is marked on the Special Factors page and present levels of performance contain the baseline data related to the behavior concerns. The following goal is evidence that behavior is addressed in the body of the IEP: Sam will reduce verbal outbursts to one incidence per week. Supporting Details: Behavior is marked on the Special Factors page and present levels of performance contain the baseline data related to the behavioral concerns. The following goal is evidence that behavior is addressed in the body of the IEP. Sam will follow all school rules identified in the student handout with a minimum of one infraction per month. Supporting Details: Behavior is marked on the Special Factors page and present levels of performance contain the baseline data related to the behavioral concerns.

31 Special Factors: IEP Inter-rater Agreement Tool Rationale Example # 1 is compliant and strategically designed to improve student performance for the following reasons: 1.The content of the IEP demonstrates a working knowledge of special factors and considerations identified in IDEIA. 2.The IEP identifies opportunities for the use of positive behavioral interventions and supports to address behavior. 3.There is evidence of integration and coordination throughout the student’s course of study and educational environment.

32 Visual Impairments Assess: âBraille âage of onset of visual impairment âeffects of additional disabilities âsocial interactions âsensory functioning âorientation and mobility skills If Braille is medium of choice, how will it be integrated into the entire curriculum? Plan for meaningful participation in curricular and extracurricular activities and environments?

33 Limited English Proficiency Assess: âCultural background âPrior academic experience âIf language skills allow for meaningful access to general education curriculum Determine: âDisability? âLinguistic difference? âBoth? Provide accommodations that allow the family to actively participate in the decision making process of MFE and IEP

34 Communication Assess: âLanguage and communication needs âalternative communication system Consider effects on: âsocial-emotional âinteractions with others âbehavior âacademic performance

35 Deaf or Hard of Hearing Assess: ↓ Hearing ↓ Processing of auditory information ↓ Need for supports to access instruction Consider effects on: ↓ social-emotional ↓ interactions with others ↓ academic performance

36 Assistive Technology Assess: âneed for assistive technology âenvironments (home, school, community) âwhere the student will need to communicate âneeds of staff, family members to be fluent in the communication system or device used by the student âopportunity for direct communication with peers and adults in the student’s environments âopportunity for meaningful participation in curricular and extracurricular activities

37 Physical Education âThe student’s PE program is adapted as described in the IEP. Because all students get PE, this should be checked only when:

38 Extended School Year Means: âservices provided to students beyond the regular school year ânecessary, not just beneficial, for student to receive FAPE âdesigned to meet each student’s unique needs âservices are the same or a portion of that received during the past school year

39 Transition Age 16 âFocus on linkages to the community and post-school environments âBased on student’s needs, interests, and preferences âDesigned within an outcome-oriented process âA coordinated set of activities integrated into IEP components

40 Testing and Assessment Purpose of modifications âTo level the playing field âAllow students to show what they know âIncrease participation in assessment and accountability systems Purpose of Participation in Local and State assessment âHigher expectations âGreater accountability âMore meaningful outcomes for students

41 4Parent(s) 4Child, if appropriate 4General Education Teacher 4Intervention Specialist or related service provider 4School District Representative 4Individual to interpret instructional implications of evaluation results 4Others knowledgeable or with special expertise regarding the child


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