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Essential Elements for Progress Monitoring Mandy Carter Lori Dehart Tammy Wall Big East Educational Cooperative.

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Presentation on theme: "Essential Elements for Progress Monitoring Mandy Carter Lori Dehart Tammy Wall Big East Educational Cooperative."— Presentation transcript:

1 Essential Elements for Progress Monitoring Mandy Carter Lori Dehart Tammy Wall Big East Educational Cooperative

2 Taking a Look at today’s Session For determining next step instructional needs and reporting student progress, participants will be provided: An overview of essential elements for a progress monitoring system to collect and analyze data A review of Methods of Measurement A review of the sections found in the “Guidance Document for Individual Education Program (IEP) Development, May 12, 2012”’

3 ecialed/excep/Pages/IEP- Guidance-and- documents.aspx Page 1

4 Student Performance Data Information that demonstrates how the student is performing academically, behaviorally, socially, and functionally. This data also assists the ARC in decision- making and development of the IEP for each student. 707 KAR 1:320 § 5 (1), 34 CFR (a)(1) 707 KAR 1:300 § 4 (10), 34 CFR (c)(4) Page 5

5 Examples of Student Performance Data Classroom observations Work samples (e.g., portfolios, daily assignment) Functional Behavior Assessment Behavior Intervention Plan Transition Assessments (for students in 8 th grade or age 14 and older) Person-Centered Planning Individual Learning Plan (ILP) or Individual Graduation Plan (IGP) Student & parent surveys Interviews IEP progress monitoring data IEP progress reports Results of research based interventions Results of universal screening Integrated Assessment Report Page 5

6 What is Progress Monitoring? Progress Monitoring is the ongoing process of collecting and analyzing data to determine student progress toward specific skills or general outcomes and to make instructional decisions. Page 62

7 Purposes of Progress Monitoring Measure and report progress toward goals Determine the effectiveness of instructional services Guide instructional decisions and make adjustments Determine current level of learning/behavior/performance Provide data for the reevaluation process Determine if the student continues to meet eligibility for special education AND need specially designed instruction Page 62

8 Data Collection System – Essential Elements The Service Provider reviews the IEP annual goals to identify target behavior to be measured, circumstances in which to teach and assess the skill/behavior target (criterion), method of measurement and frequency of data collection using the following steps: Page 63

9 Data Collection System – Essential Elements 1. Review Measurable Annual Goals and Benchmarks/Short-term Objectives 2. Transfer information from the IEP Goals to the monitoring system: a) Observable behavior within the annual goal b) Baseline described in the present levels of educational performance c) Criterion level, based on the expected rate of growth Page 63

10 Data Collection System – Essential Elements 4. Collect the data using the identified method of measurement and intervals of data collection 5. Analyze the data 6. Make data-driven instructional adjustments, as needed 7. Communicate progress to: a) Regular education teacher(s) of the student b) Parents as indicated on the Reporting Progress c) ARC, at least annually Page 63

11 When auditorily presented with a “wh-question”, Candance will verbally answer the question with 80% accuracy over three consecutive sessions. Step 1. Review Measurable Annual Goals and Benchmarks/Short-term Objectives.

12 Step 2. Transfer information from the IEP Goals to the monitoring system: When auditorily presented with a “wh- question”, Candance will verbally answer the question with 80% accuracy over three consecutive sessions.

13 Baseline performance describes the student’s current performance of a skill or strategy in measurable terms (e.g., words per minute, % correct in 3 out of 5 trials, # minutes to sustain a behavior, level of prompts necessary to sustain a behavior). The baseline serves as a starting point for IEP instruction. Baseline data for an initial IEP is based on student performance data, research based intervention data and instructional data within the integrated assessment report. Baseline data for subsequent IEPs is based on IEP progress monitoring. 2b. Baseline described in the present levels of educational performance:

14 Data Point Score % Candance’s Data

15 2c. Criterion level, based on the expected rate of growth When auditorily presented with a “wh-question”, Candance will verbally answer the question with 80% accuracy over three consecutive sessions.

16 The greatest danger for most of us is not that our aim is too high and we miss it, but that it is too low and we reach it. Michelangelo A THOUGHT ABOUT SETTING STUDENT GOALS.

17 Step 3. Draw an aim-line from the baseline to the criterion. X

18 Notes about Aimline X If the goal is to increase a “behavior”, the aim-line will be ascending.

19 Notes about Aimline X If the goal is to decrease a “behavior”, the aim- line will be descending.

20 Step 4. Collect the data using the identified method of measurement and intervals of data collection. When auditorily presented with a “wh- question”, Candance will verbally answer the question with 80% accuracy over three consecutive sessions as measured by a check-list.

21 Data Collection System Compilation Schedule The data compilation schedule depends upon the data collection frequency Suggested compilation schedules: If data is collectedThen data should be compiled DailyWeekly Two or three times per week Bi-weekly or monthly Once a weekMonthly An Administrator’s Guide to Measuring Achievement for Students with IEPs.

22 Remember…. “If you can not measure it, you cannot improve it.”

23 Characteristics of Effective Methods of Measurement Measures the behavior outlined in the goal; provides objective measurement or description of the behavior(s) or skill(s) outlined in the goal(s) Provide for regular and frequent data collection Uses an equivalent measure each time Allows for analysis of performance over time (e.g., create graph of data to determine progress toward goal) Require a short amount of time for recording information; easy to implement May involve the student in data collection and analysis of performance, as appropriate Page 36

24 Curriculum Based Measurement (CBM) A set of standardized measures of reading, spelling, written expression, and/or math that are standardized to provide valid and reliable indications of student progress. Examples of Classroom Based Measures include: Oral Reading Fluency Math Computation (addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers, fractions, and decimals) Math Concepts and Applications (place value, time, money, charts, graphs, and problem solving) Page 36

25 Examples of Direct Measures Involves direct observation of performance and repeated recordings of student response. Frequency Count/Event Recording Time Sampling/Interval Recording Duration Recording Latency Recording Scatterplot ABC Analysis Anecdotal Recordings Checklists Page 36&37

26 Examples of Indirect Measures Involve using scoring criteria to review student performance to supplement Direct Measures. Rubrics Goal Attainment Scaling Teacher Interview Checklist Scoring Guide Permanent Product Page 37

27 Examples of Authentic Assessment Measures a student’s performance in tasks and situations that resemble real- life tasks and situations. This type of assessment is closely aligned with and models what the student performance Student Interview/Conference Oral Interview Portfolio Work Samples Annotation Page 37

28 Step 4. Collect the data using the identified method of measurement and intervals of data collection. When auditorily presented with a “wh-question”, Candance will verbally answer the question with 80% accuracy over three consecutive sessions as measured by a checklist.

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30 Why Chart Progress on a Graph? Summarizes data collected periodically during the duration of services outlined within the IEP Creates documentation and visual representation of the student’s progress Provides the team with useful reference points in time to guide discussion and decisions during the ARC process

31 Method of Measurement Checklist When auditorily presented with a “wh-question”, Candance will verbally answer the question with 80% accuracy over three consecutive sessions.as measured by a checklist. Date Number of Question AskedNumber CorrectPercentage 09/11/ /18/ /01/

32 X

33 Step 5. Analyze the Data  Student progress is considered in relationship to each goal.  Data must be collected regularly, frequently and analyzed to determine: Whether or not SDI is effective If the student is progressing as expected to meet the annual goal criteria

34 Data Collection System Schedule The effectiveness of services and instructional method is determined most efficiently when progress is measured frequently: If progress is monitoredThen effectiveness may Daily, as part of instructionBe determined within 2 weeks Twice a weekBe determined within a month WeeklyBe determined within a quarter QuarterlyNOT be determined, even after a year An Administrator’s Guide to Measuring Achievement for Students with IEPs.

35 Analyzing you Graph

36 Step 6. Make data-driven instructional adjustments, as needed. Four aspects to consider: 1. Progress Did the student make the progress expected by the IEP team? (criteria) 2. Comparison to Peers or Standards How does the student’s performance compare with the performance of general education students? 3. Independence Is the student more independent within the goal area? 4. Goal Status Will this goal area continue?

37 Based on data, what needs to take place? aimline

38 Based on data, what needs to take place? X aimline

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40 Step 7. Communicate progress to: 1. Regular education teacher(s) of the student 2. Parents as indicated on Reporting Progress 3. ARC, at least annually

41 Data Reporting Progress Report to Parents An IEP shall include a statement of: When periodic reports on the progress the child is making toward meeting the annual goals, (which may include the use of quarterly or other periodic reports concurrent with the issuance of report cards) will be provided. 707 KAR 1:320 § 5 (13)(b), 34 CFR (a)(3)(ii) Page 43

42 Things to Consider when Reporting Progress Has the student made progress toward the goal/s as expected? How is the student performance compared to similar age peers? Is the student progressing toward independence in the goal area? Is the student on target to meet the goal/s?

43 Examples of Reporting Progress Aim-line

44 Examples of Reporting Progress X X X Aim-line

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46 Data are usually collected before, during, and after instruction: Before determines the BASELINE During tells the educator whether the student PERFORMS the behavior (ex. comprehends a reading passage, uses a switch, follows directions, solves an algebraic equation, etc.) independently or with assistance After CONFIRMS the learning by the student

47 Progress Monitoring Data Collection Cycle Initial Eligibility: Direct intervention Historical data Standardized assessments Diagnostic assessment Curriculum Based Assessment Parent input IEP Development: Develop Goals & Benchmarks, Short-Term Objectives Identify Methods of Measurement Identify SDI Determine LRE & Special Education and Related Services IEP Implementation: Provide SDI according to Goals & Benchmarks/Short-Term Objectives Collect progress data Continuous Progress Monitoring: Analyze data to evaluate effectiveness of instruction Adjust instruction as necessary Review/revise IEP at least annually (or earlier if there are concerns about making progress toward achieving the goal) Page 62

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49 Graphing Samples

50 Transferring Data to a Graph

51 Fifteen Minute DailyInterval Sheet

52 Student Behavior : Writing paragraphs of 30 or more words given title and topic sentence. Date# of wordsDate# of words 3/16164/0124 3/18244/0325 3/23204/0720 3/25204/924 3/28184/1325

53 Example of Curriculum Based Measurement Literacy

54 Example of CMB for Mathematics

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