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Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © 20091 Solutions for Educating Students with Down Syndrome Fostering growth through engagement, communication,

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Presentation on theme: "Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © 20091 Solutions for Educating Students with Down Syndrome Fostering growth through engagement, communication,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Solutions for Educating Students with Down Syndrome Fostering growth through engagement, communication, and learning! Laurie A. Lundblad, PsyD, PNP, BC Psychologist - Nurse - Mom

2 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Objectives This workshop will provide an overview of the specific learning needs characteristic of students with Down syndrome. Tips, strategies and solutions relevant to pre-school through high school will be covered

3 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © You will learn: (About: us, the kids, how to) US How to open the lines of communication Effective home/school partnership techniques The Kids Health issues affecting learning

4 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © You will learn: (About: us, the kids, how to) HOW TO: Effective Instructional techniques and IEP goals Environmental factors which promote success Ways to promote independence How to promote friendships Behavior modification strategies Alternatives to reward systems Various community resources

5 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © The Disguise How Down syndrome changes… –Your View –My View –Our Relationship(s)

6 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © What do we need to make this work? RULE BOOK A New…

7 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © CAUTION: Raising, Teaching, Loving a Child with a Disability is fraught with emotionality DUHHH…

8 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © High Emotion > Rational Thought Don’t let your Amygdala Get in Your way

9 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © The Dance of Partnership ( Why do my feet hurt?) Do You Hear What I Hear? Parents and Professionals Working Together for Children with Special Needs by Janice Fialka and Karen C. Mikus

10 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © No Partnership without Relationship

11 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Health Issues Children with Down syndrome and Learning

12 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © What is Down syndrome? Down syndrome (DS), also called Trisomy 21, is a condition in which extra genetic material causes delays in the way a child develops, both mentally and physically. It affects about 1 in every 800 babies.

13 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © What is Down syndrome? The physical features and medical problems associated with Down syndrome can vary widely from child to child. While some kids with DS need a lot of medical attention, others lead healthy lives. Though Down syndrome can't be prevented, it can be detected before a child is born.

14 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © How Down Syndrome Can Affect the Health of Kids Kids with Down syndrome tend to share certain physical features such as a flat facial profile, an upward slant to the eyes, small ears, and a protruding tongue.

15 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © How Down Syndrome Can Affect the Health of Kids Low muscle tone (called hypotonia) Babies in particular may seem especially "floppy." Most children with DS typically reach developmental milestones — like sitting up, crawling, and walking — later than other kids.

16 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © How Down Syndrome Can Affect the Health of Kids At birth, kids with DS are usually of average size but they will grow at a slower rate and remain smaller than their peers.

17 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © How Down Syndrome Can Affect the Health of Kids For infants, low muscle tone may contribute to sucking and feeding problems As well as constipation and other digestive issues. Toddlers and older kids may have delays in speech and self-care skills like feeding, dressing, and toilet teaching.

18 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © How Down Syndrome Can Affect the Health of Kids While some kids with DS have no significant health problems, others may experience a host of medical issues that require extra care Almost half of all children born with DS will have a congenital heart defect

19 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © How Down Syndrome Can Affect the Health of Kids Kids with Down syndrome are also at an increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension, a serious condition that can lead to irreversible damage to the lungs. All infants with Down syndrome should be evaluated by a pediatric cardiologist

20 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © How Down Syndrome Can Affect the Health of Kids Approximately half of all kids with DS have problems with hearing and vision. Hearing loss can be related to fluid buildup in the inner ear or to structural problems of the ear itself. Vision problems commonly include amblyopia (lazy eye), near- or farsightedness, and an increased risk of cataracts. »Regular evaluations by an audiologist and an ophthalmologist are necessary to detect and correct any problems before they affect language and learning skills.

21 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © How Down Syndrome Can Affect the Health of Kids Other medical conditions that may occur more frequently in kids with DS include thyroid problems, intestinal abnormalities, seizure disorders, respiratory problems, obesity, an increased susceptibility to infection, and a higher risk of childhood leukemia. Fortunately, many of these conditions are treatable.

22 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © How Down Syndrome Can Affect Kids’ Learning DS affects kids' ability to learn in different ways Most have mild to moderate cognitive impairment. Kids with DS can and do learn They are capable of developing skills throughout their lives. They simply reach goals at a different pace

23 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © How Down Syndrome Can Affect Kids’ Learning Kids with DS have a wide range of abilities, and there's no way to tell at birth what they will be capable of as they grow up.

24 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © What do parents and teachers want for a child with DS?

25 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © “I want him to say my name” “I wish she could tell me her thoughts and wishes” “I want him to play like other kids and have friends” “I want her to read” “I want him to be successful at whatever he wants to do in life” “I want him pay attention and learn in school”

26 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Early Intervention Monitor health Speech and Language Therapy Occupational Therapy Physical Therapy School Parent Education

27 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Social – Communication Skills and Civil Behavior are the foundation to future social, emotional, cognitive, and academic success

28 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Adult’s communication style is the single most influential tool for helping children become more social and communicative MacDonald, J. D. (2004). Communicating Partners: 30 Years of Building Responsive Relationships with Late-Talking Children including Autism, Asperger's Syndrome (ASD), Down Syndrome, and Typical Development. Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

29 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Is your communication style ‘possible’ for your child with DS? MacDonald, J. D. (2004). Communicating Partners: 30 Years of Building Responsive Relationships with Late- Talking Children including Autism, Asperger's Syndrome (ASD), Down Syndrome, and Typical Development. Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

30 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © ?!? Possible ?!? What do You Mean… “Possible” ?!? Too much, too fast, too soon is IMPOSSIBLE for children with DS

31 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Adult Communication Style with Developmentally Delayed Children In regards to communication style, parents of developmentally delayed children are less responsive and more directive than parents of typically developing children Adults speak with questions and commands that do not allow child conversational freedom Children are asked to talk “too soon” without having the social and communicative skills needed before language MacDonald, J. D. (2004). Communicating Partners: 30 Years of Building Responsive Relationships with Late-Talking Children including Autism, Asperger's Syndrome (ASD), Down Syndrome, and Typical Development. Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

32 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Video: Kenny and Mom Short Cuts Dr. James D. MacDonald

33 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Too much … too soon Shuts children with DS down Prohibits social and cognitive development Keeps children with DS from practicing sounds that are necessary to make intelligible words Results in noncompliance and antisocial behavior

34 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Communicating Partners Dr. James MacDonald Professor Emeritus, Ohio State University 30 years of research Multiple publications

35 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Communicating Partners Research Responsive, playful adult style is more effective at helping children interact than a directive approach This research was concurrently confirmed by Gerald Mahoney and Powell (1988), Bruner (1990), Girolometto, Verbay and Tannock (1994), Kaiser and Hester (1994), Mahoney, Finger and Powell (1985), Stern (1997), Trevarthen et al. (1998), Wells (1986)

36 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Communicating Partners Research Children have a considerable communicative life long before they become habitual talkers Children with developmental disabilities do not interact enough to develop social language When they do interact, life partners often behaved in ways far above what the child could try to do (mismatched) Life partners did not behave in ways that were closely related to a child’s interests (unresponsive) MacDonald, J. D. (2004). Communicating Partners: 30 Years of Building Responsive Relationships with Late-Talking Children including Autism, Asperger's Syndrome (ASD), Down Syndrome, and Typical Development. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. MacDonald, J. & Stoika, P. (2007). Play to Talk: A Practical Guide to Help Your Late Talking Child Join Conversation. Madison: WI: Kiddo Publishing.

37 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Your Child’s Developmental Goals

38 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Supporting Child Development A Child is Ready to Talk When: Plays more active than passive role with people Prefers being with people than being alone Plays with people Responds to speech Plays meaningfully with things Interacts frequently with people Communicates with sounds Communicates with movements Practices making many sounds by himself Takes turns in play Imitates other sounds Imitates others actions MacDonald, J. D. (2004). Communicating Partners: 30 Years of Building Responsive Relationships with Late-Talking Children including Autism, Asperger's Syndrome (ASD), Down Syndrome, and Typical Development. Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

39 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Video: Imitation The first step to communication (Conner, Mom, and Jodie)

40 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Communication Problems and Down syndrome Far Too Little Interaction Too Little Playing in the Child’s World Too Much Stimulation Dead End Contacts Getting Stuck Communicating Without Words Not Knowing What to Say Too Much School Language The Habit of Supporting Old and Inappropriate Behaviors

41 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Communicating Partners Research Adult Strategies that predict whether a child will stay and participate: Responding to the child’s nonverbal behaviors and point of interest Matching the child’s behavior in terms of acting and communicating in ways the child could try Playing with emotional affect and making interaction more play than work MacDonald, J. D. (2004). Communicating Partners: 30 Years of Building Responsive Relationships with Late-Talking Children including Autism, Asperger's Syndrome (ASD), Down Syndrome, and Typical Development. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. MacDonald, J. & Stoika, P. (2007). Play to Talk: A Practical Guide to Help Your Late Talking Child Join Conversation. Madison: WI: Kiddo Publishing.

42 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Communicating Partners Research –Adult Strategies that predict whether a child will stay and participate (con’t): Balancing the interactions and allowing the child silent time to take his turns Sharing control by following the child’s lead some of the time and taking the lead some of the time MacDonald, J. D. (2004). Communicating Partners: 30 Years of Building Responsive Relationships with Late-Talking Children including Autism, Asperger's Syndrome (ASD), Down Syndrome, and Typical Development. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. MacDonald, J. & Stoika, P. (2007). Play to Talk: A Practical Guide to Help Your Late Talking Child Join Conversation. Madison: WI: Kiddo Publishing.

43 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Video: Waiting Giving your child space for him to Develop a Communication (Conner and Mom)

44 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Communicating Partners Research THE MORE A CHILD INTERACTS WITH PERSONS WHO ACT LIKE HIM THE MORE THE CHILD WILL LEARN MacDonald, J. D. (2004). Communicating Partners: 30 Years of Building Responsive Relationships with Late-Talking Children including Autism, Asperger's Syndrome (ASD), Down Syndrome, and Typical Development. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. MacDonald, J. & Stoika, P. (2007). Play to Talk: A Practical Guide to Help Your Late Talking Child Join Conversation. Madison: WI: Kiddo Publishing.

45 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Communicating Partners Five Stages of Communicative Development Interaction Non-Verbal Communication Social Language Conversation Civil Behavior MacDonald, J. D. (2004). Communicating Partners: 30 Years of Building Responsive Relationships with Late-Talking Children including Autism, Asperger's Syndrome (ASD), Down Syndrome, and Typical Development. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. MacDonald, J. & Stoika, P. (2007). Play to Talk: A Practical Guide to Help Your Late Talking Child Join Conversation. Madison: WI: Kiddo Publishing.

46 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Communicating Partners Parents can help children with Down syndrome give and get a great deal in life if they are willing to do a few simple but often difficult things: Play in the child’s world habitually Make children enjoyable play partners before they are obedient students Don’t worry about school language before children have a good vocabulary for daily natural communication

47 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Communicating Partners Be very careful not to expect too little (by doing too much for children) or to expect too much (by setting up impossible jobs Pay more attention to positive little steps than to things you may think are mistakes Act and communicate in ways children can do (matching) Interact back and forth throughout the day Be sure children are giving to you as much as you are giving to them

48 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Teaching Strategy: Sensitive Responding Responding involves “replying immediately to you child‘s movements, sounds or words even the most subtle behaviors, with your own movements, facial expressions, sounds or words. MacDonald, J. D. (2004). Communicating Partners: 30 Years of Building Responsive Relationships with Late-Talking Children including Autism, Asperger's Syndrome (ASD), Down Syndrome, and Typical Development. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. MacDonald, J. & Stoika, P. (2007). Play to Talk: A Practical Guide to Help Your Late Talking Child Join Conversation. Madison: WI: Kiddo Publishing.

49 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Teaching Strategy: Sensitive Responding When the child does something, immediately do something in response. He will tend to do more of the things you respond to and less of the things you do not respond to. MacDonald, J. D. (2004). Communicating Partners: 30 Years of Building Responsive Relationships with Late-Talking Children including Autism, Asperger's Syndrome (ASD), Down Syndrome, and Typical Development. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. MacDonald, J. & Stoika, P. (2007). Play to Talk: A Practical Guide to Help Your Late Talking Child Join Conversation. Madison: WI: Kiddo Publishing.

50 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Teaching Strategy: Balancing Balancing means taking about as many turns as your child, and turns that are about as long as your child’s turns. Balancing requires active and silent waiting for your child to take a turn, and also shortening then length of your turns. MacDonald, J. D. (2004). Communicating Partners: 30 Years of Building Responsive Relationships with Late-Talking Children including Autism, Asperger's Syndrome (ASD), Down Syndrome, and Typical Development. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. MacDonald, J. & Stoika, P. (2007). Play to Talk: A Practical Guide to Help Your Late Talking Child Join Conversation. Madison: WI: Kiddo Publishing.

51 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Teaching Strategy: Balancing As you begin to do a little less, your child will do a little more by gradually increasing his number of turns in an interaction. The less you do … the more your child will do MacDonald, J. D. (2004). Communicating Partners: 30 Years of Building Responsive Relationships with Late-Talking Children including Autism, Asperger's Syndrome (ASD), Down Syndrome, and Typical Development. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. MacDonald, J. & Stoika, P. (2007). Play to Talk: A Practical Guide to Help Your Late Talking Child Join Conversation. Madison: WI: Kiddo Publishing.

52 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Teaching Strategy: Matching Matching is about being “developmentally possible” for your child. Matching involves doing actions your child can do and using sounds and words your child can say. MacDonald, J. D. (2004). Communicating Partners: 30 Years of Building Responsive Relationships with Late-Talking Children including Autism, Asperger's Syndrome (ASD), Down Syndrome, and Typical Development. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. MacDonald, J. & Stoika, P. (2007). Play to Talk: A Practical Guide to Help Your Late Talking Child Join Conversation. Madison: WI: Kiddo Publishing.

53 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Teaching Strategy: Matching To help your child learn new actions, sounds and words, try “progressive matching”: do what he is doing or make sounds like the ones he is making then after a few times turn taking show a next possible step (+1). Add another step or a new idea to an action sequence. Expand language in small steps by translating sounds into words or by expanding a one-word statement into two words. Add to whatever your child is currently doing in order to help him take a next step. MacDonald, J. D. (2004). Communicating Partners: 30 Years of Building Responsive Relationships with Late-Talking Children including Autism, Asperger's Syndrome (ASD), Down Syndrome, and Typical Development. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. MacDonald, J. & Stoika, P. (2007). Play to Talk: A Practical Guide to Help Your Late Talking Child Join Conversation. Madison: WI: Kiddo Publishing.

54 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Video: Matching - Turn taking (Conner and Mom)

55 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Teaching Strategy: Sharing Control Sharing control means that both you and your child make choices and lead the interaction about half the time. Neither partner dominates all the activities, decisions or conversation. If your child tends to be passive or does little when you are together, you need to give him more control by waiting silently and letting him to initiate or choose what to do next. MacDonald, J. D. (2004). Communicating Partners: 30 Years of Building Responsive Relationships with Late-Talking Children including Autism, Asperger's Syndrome (ASD), Down Syndrome, and Typical Development. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. MacDonald, J. & Stoika, P. (2007). Play to Talk: A Practical Guide to Help Your Late Talking Child Join Conversation. Madison: WI: Kiddo Publishing.

56 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Teaching Strategy: Sharing Control If your child tends to dominate the activity or conversation, you need to take more control for yourself. How?...gentle insistence, by being so much fun, he can’t resist you. Use slapstick humor, schmooze, tease, cajole. MacDonald, J. D. (2004). Communicating Partners: 30 Years of Building Responsive Relationships with Late-Talking Children including Autism, Asperger's Syndrome (ASD), Down Syndrome, and Typical Development. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. MacDonald, J. & Stoika, P. (2007). Play to Talk: A Practical Guide to Help Your Late Talking Child Join Conversation. Madison: WI: Kiddo Publishing.

57 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Teaching Strategy: Being Emotionally Playful Being affirming involves letting the child see that you enjoy and value your time with him. It often means being playful, light-hearted and even silly. Playful and affirming partners feel relaxed together, have fun together, and know that their actions are “good enough” and won’t be judged or criticized. MacDonald, J. D. (2004). Communicating Partners: 30 Years of Building Responsive Relationships with Late-Talking Children including Autism, Asperger's Syndrome (ASD), Down Syndrome, and Typical Development. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. MacDonald, J. & Stoika, P. (2007). Play to Talk: A Practical Guide to Help Your Late Talking Child Join Conversation. Madison: WI: Kiddo Publishing.

58 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Teaching Strategy: Being Emotionally Playful However, being affirming does not mean allowing the child to do anything he wants. The goal is to be affirming while maintaining clear limits about unsafe or unacceptable behavior. MacDonald, J. D. (2004). Communicating Partners: 30 Years of Building Responsive Relationships with Late-Talking Children including Autism, Asperger's Syndrome (ASD), Down Syndrome, and Typical Development. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. MacDonald, J. & Stoika, P. (2007). Play to Talk: A Practical Guide to Help Your Late Talking Child Join Conversation. Madison: WI: Kiddo Publishing.

59 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Video: Playful Responding: Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery (Conner, Jodie, and Mom)

60 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Early Literacy Skills, School Supports and Strategies Inclusion practices Using visual supports Behavioral Strategies: Beyond a System of Reward Source: National Down Syndrome Society: Inclusion

61 Literacy An interaction between listening, speaking, reading, and writing Each is an important function of the other A child from a ‘literate home’ is exposed to over 1,000 hours of informal reading and writing encounters before entering school Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com ©

62 Literacy Methods Develops vocabulary Improves expressive language Teaches visual and auditory attention Teaches higher language skills, rhyming, prediction` Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com ©

63 General Guidelines for Teaching Reading 1.Introduce reading before speech –Environmental print helps with development of symbol awareness Cut pictures and words from food products, toys, games create books Pictures of people and places Becomes a system of communication Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com ©

64 General Guidelines for Teaching Reading 2. Read books with predictable themes 3. Reading stories to gain meaning, scaffold responses to model prediction and understanding 4. Kids are more likely to read a story they have heard before Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com ©

65 General Guidelines for Teaching Reading 5. Begin to introduce words from a whole- word, sight reading approach 6. Introduce 2-word combinations after he has acquired 50 words or more 7. First words should be highly functional, such as, child’s name, mom, dad, favorite food item, toys, etc Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com ©

66 General Guidelines for Teaching Literacy 8. Use errorless teaching methods to reduce frustration and establish self- confidence 9. Use combination of direct learning and rehearsal for establishment of academic skills and generalization Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com ©

67 Literacy resources Buckley, S. (1995). Teaching children with Down Syndrome to read and write. In L. Nadel & D. Rosenthal (Eds.), Down syndrome: Living and learning in the community. (pp ). NY: John Wiley & Sons. Oelwein, P. (1995). Teaching reading to children with Down Syndrome: A guide for parent and teachers. Bethesda, MD: Woodbine House. Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com ©

68 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Inclusion is… An educational process by which all students, including those with disabilities, are educated together for the majority of the day With sufficient support, students participate in age-appropriate, general education programs in their neighborhood school Source: National Down Syndrome Society: Inclusion

69 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Inclusion implies… Every person has an inherent right to fully participate in society Acceptance of differences When effectively implemented, has academic and social benefits for all students Source: National Down Syndrome Society: Inclusion

70 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Benefits of Inclusion Friendships develop Non-disabled students are more appreciative of differences Students with disabilities are more motivated Acceptance of diversity extends to home, workplace, and community Source: National Down Syndrome Society: Inclusion

71 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Inclusion is not Simply assigning an adult-helper to a student with a disability and having them physically present in a classroom of same-aged peers

72 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Successful Inclusion Practices Require A full commitment and understanding of Inclusion by school administration High-quality intensive professional development and support Refocused use of assessment Collaborative teaching models Planning time for academic/therapeutic teams Source: National Down Syndrome Society: Inclusion

73 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Successful Inclusion Practices Require Differentiated instruction Creativity, patience, willingness to fail Access to assistive technology A reliable form of communication for: –The student –Within the school team –Between school and home Source: National Down Syndrome Society: Inclusion

74 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Successful Inclusion Practices Require Whenever possible, delivery of special education and related services within the general education classroom A strengthened role of parents to participate in their child’s education Engagement, understanding, and involvement of typically developing peers and their families Natural support systems are cultivated and used to benefit the learning community Source: National Down Syndrome Society: Inclusion

75 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Successful Inclusion Practices Require IEP goals that: –Address communication, academic, behavioral, independence, and social goals –Are integrated into the activities of the classroom –A Planning Matrix can assist the IEP team in demonstrating this –Therapeutic interventions are authentic, meaningful and attend to the developmental needs of the child Source: National Down Syndrome Society: Inclusion

76 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Successful Curriculum Improving Cognitive Development –Feuerstein’s Instrumental Enrichment Multi-sensory approaches –Touch Math –Phonemic awareness/Comprehension Orton-Gillingham Association Method Fast ForWord (www.scientificlearning.com)

77 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Successful Inclusion Practices Require Resource: “IEP and Inclusion Tips for Parents and Teachers” By: Anne I. Eason, Attorney-at-Law & Kathleen Whitbread, Ph.D.

78 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Putting it all together: Addressing Behavior When does IT happen? Consider the reason: –Too much, too soon? –Boring, repetitious? –Child’s communication skills? –Emotion Sad, mad, scared –How have you reinforced the behavior?

79 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Putting it all together: Addressing Behavior Engineer the class with visual supports Helps with transitions and behavior Use support strategies: –www.Usevisualschedules.comwww.Usevisualschedules.com

80 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Putting it all together: Addressing Behavior Use support strategies: –Social Stories: –Prepares the child and teaches alternative responses

81 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Putting it all together: Addressing Behavior Use support strategies: –Teach the language of emotion: Cognitive Affective Training (CAT) : Dr. Tony Attwood visual, interactive, and customizable communication elements designed to help students become aware of how their thoughts, feelings and actions all interact the process of using the various visual components, they share their insights with others. It is an easy and effective way to work with neurotypical children and young adults as well as with people with developmental disabilities.

82 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Putting it all together: Addressing Behavior Use support strategies: –Cultivate peer friendships Phone buddies Lunch buddies Circle of Friends In class helpers

83 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Putting it all together: Addressing Behavior Use support strategies: –Assistive and augmentative technology –Research shows that if a child is not a proficient writer by third grade, she would benefit from a written output solution –www.handwriting-solutions.comwww.handwriting-solutions.com

84 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Putting it all together: Addressing Behavior Use support strategies: –Promote Independence –Once a child understands what is expected of him, rely on the developmental task of “industry” to motivate accomplishments

85 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © Putting it all together: Rely on Partnerships and Relationships Honor the developmental needs of the child Sift through school tasks and only ask for the “golden nuggets” Make a good plan and stick to it until it works! (SWAW)

86 Laurie A. Lundblad -www.BridgesTherapy.com © For More Information about Supporting Students with Disabilities in Schools or other services at Building Bridges Therapy Center: (Plymouth - Ann Arbor - Waterford) Please contact Dr. Laurie Lundblad Building Bridges Therapy Center


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