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Standards-Based IEPs Arkansas Department of Education Special Education June 2012.

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1 Standards-Based IEPs Arkansas Department of Education Special Education June 2012

2  Overview of Modules  Train the Trainer  Purpose  Module 1 Overview and importance of Standards  Module 2 Present Level and Student Profile  Module 3 Measurable Goals and Objectives  Options  Timeline  April 1, Implement Standards-Based IEPS

3  Respectful ◦ Electronics used only for session ◦ Listen to each other  Active Participant ◦ Share work ◦ Ask questions ◦ Contribute to ideas  Responsible ◦ Stay focused ◦ Complete activities

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5  Facilitator  Time Keeper  Recorder  Reporter

6  Springdale  Magnolia  Bryant  Sheridan

7 What are the Common Core State Standards? Aligned with college and work expectations Focused and coherent Include rigorous content and application of knowledge through high-order skills Build upon strengths and lessons of current state standards Internationally benchmarked so that all students are prepared to succeed in our global economy and society Based on evidence and research State led – coordinated by NGA Center and CCSSO

8 Why is this important?  Currently, every state has its own set of academic standards, meaning public education students in each state are learning to different levels  All students must be prepared to compete with not only their American peers in the next state, but with students from around the world

9 STANDARDS FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS & LITERACY IN HISTORY/SOCIAL STUDIES, SCIENCE, AND TECHNICAL SUBJECTS

10 Major design goals  Align with best evidence on college and career readiness expectations  Built on the best standards-work of the participating states  Maintain focus on what matters most for readiness

11 Design and Organization Three main sections  K−5 (cross-disciplinary)  6−12 English Language Arts  6−12 Literacy in History/Social Studies (Science and Technical Subjects have a shared responsibility for students’ literacy development) Three appendices A: Research and evidence; glossary of key terms B: Reading text exemplars; sample performance tasks C: Annotated student writing samples

12 Four strands  Reading (including Reading Foundational Skills)  Writing  Speaking and Listening  Language An integrated model of literacy Media requirements blended throughout Design and Organization

13 College and Career Readiness (CCR) anchor standards  Broad expectations consistent across grades and content areas  Based on evidence about college and workforce training expectations  Range and content

14 Design and Organization K−12 standards  Grade-specific end-of- year expectations  Developmentally appropriate, cumulative progression of skills and understandings  One-to-one correspondence with CCR standards

15 STANDARDS FOR MATHEMATICS

16 Design and Organization Standards for Mathematical Practice  Carry across all grade levels  Describe habits of mind of a mathematically expert student Standards for Mathematical Content  K-8 standards presented by grade level  Organized into domains that progress over several grades  Grade introductions give 2–4 focal points at each grade level  High school standards presented by conceptual theme (Number & Quantity, Algebra, Functions, Modeling, Geometry, Statistics & Probability)

17 Design and Organization Content standards define what students should understand and be able to do Clusters are groups of related standards Domains are larger groups that progress across grades

18 Design and Organization Focal points at each grade level

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20 Carol B. Massanari

21 Carol B. Massanari

22 Carol B. Massanari

23 Module 1: IEP Overview – A Plan for Guiding Instruction and Service Provision

24  Product:  An individualized plan reasonably calculated to result in educational benefit (FAPE)  Process:  Planning to determine what is needed for student to benefit from education

25 Desired Outcomes/ Instructional Results Write Measurable Goals Select Instructional Services & Program Supports Implement & Monitor Progress General Curriculum Expectations Current Skills and Knowledge Area of Instructional Need PLAAFP Statements on IEP Form Developing PLAAFP Statements

26  You:  Know where you want to go  Enter data about where you are  Create a map  Adjust to opportunities/barriers  Arrive and choose a new long-term goal

27  Knowing where you want to go  Using data as the basis

28  Good IEPs are:  Reasonably calculated to result in educational benefit  Connected to state standards as a fundamental component to educational benefit

29  Good IEPs are:  Dependent upon knowledge of curriculum/effective practice  Not an isolated event  Consistent with regulation/best practice

30  Requires:  Consideration of individualized data/needs  Different goals for different students based on needs

31  Why:  Are standards important?  Should we consider them?  Standards-Based IEPs?

32  Added accountability by requiring:  Demonstrated progress on state standards  Assessment on grade level standards  Students with disabilities as a reported subgroup  Regulations for the 2% (modified performance standards)

33 “…meet the child's needs... to enable the child to be involved in and make progress in the general education curriculum... ” 34 CFR (a)(2)(i)(A)

34  Successful educational outcomes for all students  Statewide Assessment Accountability for all students  Consequences for not assessing all students  Access to the general curriculum is essential to closing the achievement gap and reaching Annual Measurable Objectives (AMO)

35 “ It means that all our kids, even the ones our system calls ‘hard to teach’ can learn.” - Rod Paige, former Secretary of Education “Ready’ means ‘never’ if we continuously focus on the lowest-level skills.” - Maggie McLaughlin, Autumn 2009

36  Finish this sentence:  Standards-Based IEPs are important because…

37  What is meant by the general education curriculum?  The full range of courses, activities, lessons, and materials routinely used by the general population  What is meant by access?  Participation in the knowledge and skills that make up the general education curriculum -Alabama Department of Education

38  Provide instructional accountability  Drive general education content instruction  Support instruction in the least restrictive environment  Define the expectations of all students with or without disabilities  Create a structure for linking the IEP to the general curriculum

39  High stakes accountability, performance goals and indicators  IDEA – access to the general curriculum  Essential for closing the achievement gap  Promotes a single system of education – inclusion and a common language  Encourages greater consistency across schools and districts  It’s best for kids – assumes more, not less

40  How are you using the standards in your school to shape your curriculum?  How are you using the standards to develop IEP goals?

41  Does not mean –  Writing goals that restate the standards  Using the academic standards alone to determine goals  Assuming that every student will work only on grade level content

42  Does mean –  Referring to standards to determine expectations at grade level  Using the standards as a guide to determine what is important for the student to learn or be able to do  Conducting an analysis to determine gap between grade expectations and current skills/knowledge

43 1. Consider the grade-level content standards  Examine benchmarks  Discuss expected knowledge and skills  Consider prerequisite knowledge and skills 2. Examine student data to determine where student is in relation to grade-level standards  Compare expectations with student’s current instructional level  Gap Analysis

44  Content is determined through planning process  Development is like using a GPS

45  Depend on good data from multiple sources  Start with discussion about the desired outcome  Include vision with parent and student as a source of data  Determine instructional need(s) by a gap analysis  Include data from comprehensive evaluation as one source of data

46 High achievement always takes place in the framework of high expectation. Jack Kinder.

47 Module 2: Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance

48 Desired Outcomes Or Instructional Results Write Measurable Goals Select Instructional Services & Program Supports Implement & Monitor Progress General Curriculum Expectations Current Skills and Knowledge Area of Instructional Need PLAAFP Statements on IEP Form Developing PLAAFP Statements

49  Provide instructional accountability and access to general curriculum  Support instruction in least restrictive environment  Link the IEP to the general curriculum

50  Essential for closing the achievement gap  Promote a single system of education and consistency across schools and the district  Are best for kids – assume more, not less

51  Refer to standards to determine expectations at grade level  Use the standards as a guide to determine what is important for the student to learn or be able to do  Conduct an analysis to determine the gap between grade expectations and the student’s current skills/knowledge

52  What is meant by the general education curriculum?  The full range of courses, activities, lessons, and materials routinely used by the general population  What is meant by access?  Participation in the knowledge and skills that make up the general education curriculum -Alabama Department of Education

53 (1)...a statement of the child’s Present Levels of Academic and F unctional Performance, including— (i) how the child’s disability affects the child’s involvement and progress in the general education curriculum (i.e., the same curriculum as for nondisabled children); (ii) for preschool children, as appropriate, how the disability affects the child’s participation in appropriate activities; 34 CFR § (a)(1)

54 General Curriculum Expectations Current Skills and Knowledge Areas of Instructional Need PLAAFP Statements on IEP Form

55  What do I want to know?  Expectations of state/district standards; classroom/grade level; social/emotional  Instructional strategies/approaches used in the general classroom  Extracurricular activities of school life for students at this grade level

56  State and district standards  Course outlines/teacher descriptions  Curriculum guides  Assessments  State  Classroom (curriculum-based)  Textbooks  Extracurricular offerings and expectations for participation

57  Academic  Social emotional  Communication  Recreation/Leisure  Health, Physical, Medical  Technology  For secondary consider:  Jobs/job training  Post-secondary education  Community participation  Home/independent living

58  Academic  Tests  Work samples  Curriculum based assessments  Statewide assessments  Evaluation results  Social/emotional behavior  Classroom reports  Observation  Office referral data  Family input  Attendance

59  Communication  Reports  Observation  Language evaluation  Health/Physical  Family reports  Comprehensive evaluation  In-school nurse reports  Physical education  Self-report

60  Recreation/Leisure  Family reports  Physical education  Self-report  Extracurricular participation  Jobs & Job training  Vocational training records  Vocational/Transition assessment results  Student interview

61  Post-secondary Education  Counselor and student interviews  Transition assessments  Community Participation  Family report  Student self-report  Transition assessments

62  Home/Independent Living  Family report  Student self-report  In-school observations  Transition assessments  Other reports (use of assistive technology, accommodations, modifications)  Family  Teacher  Student

63  What:  Can the student do in school; at home?  Accommodations have helped in the past?  Is the student’s performance level on state assessments and in the classroom?

64  Curriculum based measurement or formative assessment  Tools designed to connect to the curriculum  Data to clearly describe what the student can do  Compares student growth over time

65  Discuss intent of standards:  What are the knowledge and skills necessary for the student to achieve to a level that is expected in the standards?  What are the prerequisite skills?

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67 Skills Understanding (Learning Goal) Success Criteria Say the topic that all the paragraphs address. All the paragraphs in a text are about the same topic. 1. I can determine the main idea of the text. Explain the specific focus of all the individual paragraphs. Within paragraphs there is information that goes together that is related to the main topic. 2. I can recount the key details from the text and explain how they support the main idea. Explain how the individual paragraphs relate to the main topic. Within paragraphs the author has a particular focus that is related to the main topic.

68  Determine which standards are most important for each student (based on progress in the general education curriculum)  Compare standard(s) with student’s areas of need and the impact of the disability  Use data to determine the areas the student will find difficult without additional supports

69  Leverage-standards in one subject that support student’s success in other subjects  Endurance-standards that help students across the years rather than respond to the testing of a single grade level  Readiness-essential for the next grade/standards that help students prepare for the next level of learning

70 Which standards:  Can be met with accommodations in the general classroom?  Require specialized instruction?

71 Which standards are most essential to:  Accelerate the ability to progress in the general curriculum?  Result in educational benefit?

72  Describe performance in academic and non-academic areas  Include relationship between evaluation/assessment data and Present Level Statements  Use objective, measurable terms  Ensure data is self-explanatory (or provide an explanation of score)

73 Specific Verb Phrases  Greets peer appropriately  Counts to 25  Speaks in one to two word sentences  Solves problems involving double-digit addition  Names five careers and jobs associated with each Vague Verb Phrases  Is friendly  Received a math score of 90  Can’t talk well  Knows his letters  Knows different careers  Talks excessively  Is a loner

74  Jim is fluent (reads 120 words per minute) when reading material that is written at a 3 rd grade reading level.  Susie can answer comprehension questions with 90 to 100% accuracy when listening to material that is used in her classroom.  When interacting with peers, Paul is quick to get into arguments using inappropriate language (profanity) and a loud voice.

75  Becky is able to put together a 50 piece jigsaw puzzle without assistance.  Wendell can use a computer to locate information and to communicate with friends via .

76  Receives reading in the resource room  STAR reading of 340  The disability impacts progress in the general education classroom

77 General Curriculum Expectations Current Skills and Knowledge Areas of Instructional Need PLAAFP Statements on IEP Form

78  Part I  Description of what the student can do; strengths, based on general curriculum expectations  Part II  Conversation to identify the gaps in skills/knowledge associated with the disability

79  What:  Skills/knowledge are expected for the student in the general classroom?  Skills/knowledge does the student currently have?  Is the gap, or what skills/knowledge is critical for the student to be able to access the general curriculum at grade level?  Do you know about the student’s learning rate?  Accommodations have been used successfully to support the student’s learning?

80  Consider the target grade level standards RI.6.2: Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.

81 1. Consider the target grade level standards  Identify critical knowledge and skills within the standards  Use a data analysis process to conduct a drill down

82 2. Of these skills, where does the student demonstrate proficiency? (These could become descriptors in the Present Level Statements)  Formal assessment  Informal assessment

83 3. Can the standard(s) be achieved with an accommodation?  For example, can the student:  Demonstrate the central idea of a text if given orally rather than being asked to read the items independently?  Summarize the text when it is read orally?

84 4. Given these responses:  What skills need to be taught explicitly to demonstrate proficiency on the targeted standard/s?  Which skills/knowledge can be acquired in the general classroom with an accommodation/assistive technology?

85 Consider other functional skill areas that may not be directly connected to the academic standards, and determine which areas need specialized instruction through the IEP.

86  Just as a review, we have already talked about:  Identifying critical standards  Collecting/analyzing data relative to the student’s current academic performance  Collecting/analyzing data relative to the student’s functional performance  Identifying instructional need  Present Level Statements

87 Assignment: 1.Review the selected standard for English/Language Arts 2.Make notes of critical expectations 3.Document the student’s current skills and knowledge specific to the standard 4.Conduct an analysis of data using the process we have just been talking about and document results  Hang on to your notes. We’ll be using them later Expectations and Current Knowledge and Skills IEP Handout A: Karen

88 On the IEP:  The Present Level Statements must include:  Academic and functional performance: strengths, needs and data sources  Adverse affect of the disability in the general education curriculum - The Impact Statement for preschool children, the affect on participation in age appropriate activities

89  Strengths: Student’s response to:  Learning strategies  Accommodations  Interventions  Standards instruction Ask… What have we learned about this student’s academic skills and knowledge?

90  Needs: Focus on needs that affect progress in the general education curriculum  progress in learning grade level standards Ask… What prerequisite skills/knowledge does the student need to close the gap between his/her Present Level and the grade-level content standards?

91  Use up-to-date descriptive data: Cory reads 24 wpm, while the benchmark for 2 nd graders in the regular curriculum is wpm. Cory can say 5 out of 10 short and long vowel sounds. He cannot read multi- syllabic words.

92  Student’s:  social/emotional (behavioral) performance  communication skills  performance in areas of recreation/leisure, self-management, independent living, etc. Ask … “ What have we learned about this student’s ability to function independently and appropriately with peers and adults?”

93  Use up-to-date descriptive data: In a classroom observation, Cory sat quietly in his seat for 10 minutes. At the 10-minute mark, he began to look around the room, followed by twirling his pencil and playing with his paper. When placed with a partner to complete his work, he was able to remain on task and complete the assignment…

94  How does the disability affect performance?  Consider how it affects progress in learning the grade-level content standards – the Impact Statement.

95  Do not use the student’s exceptionality to explain how the disability affects involvement/progress in the general curriculum when developing the Impact Statement.  What not to write: Marley’s learning disability affects his progress in the general curriculum.  What to write: Marley’s weakness in applying strategies, such as making inferences and complex predictions, affect his progress in comprehending sixth- grade literary materials.

96  Some states require:  A single comprehensive statement  One for each goal /area  Remember:  Gather information; then record it  Process first; form second

97 The profile should include general statements regarding:  Strengths  Needs  Assessment/Evaluation  Status of prior IEP goals  Teacher/Parent/Student input  Transition needs (at least by age 16)

98  Student’s response to:  Learning strategies  Accommodations  Interventions  Standards or classroom instruction Ask… “What have we learned about this student’s skills and knowledge?”  Use data to write student profiles

99 Similarities:  Data-based  Provide a description of the student  Provide a sense of where the student is functioning in regard to areas of need

100 Differences:  Profile is an overview of where student is functioning in relation to their school experiences  Profile is a general picture of the student’s functioning in all areas relevant to the IEP  Present level addresses priorities for goal writing  Present level provides a summary of baseline information that indicates the student’s achievement on specific standards or functional skills

101 Carol B. Massanari

102 Carol B. Massanari

103  Practice identifying Student Profile components. IEP Handout A: Karen Karen Student Profile

104 The Present Level should include specific statements regarding:  Strengths  Needs  Assessment/Evaluation  Impact of the disability  As they relate to the specific standard or area of functional performance chosen for the goal.

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107  Briefly review the Present Level examples at your table.

108 Carol B. Massanari

109  Writing Present Level Statements Writing Present Level Statements

110 Rosie has trouble controlling her behavior. She gets easily upset when interacting with peers and does not take direction from authority. Once off task it is really hard to reengage her Writing Present Level Statements

111 Rosie enjoys socializing with peers, and will play cooperatively with them some of the time. Her teacher reports that more often, Rosie is off task and interacts inappropriately with her peers. Observations of Rosie indicated that when interacting with peers, Rosie became upset (cried, threw material, left the group) 55% of the time within the first five minutes of a group activity. Once off task, it took up to 20 minutes for her to reengage in the activity.

112  Rosie has improved in mathematics since last year. She can add and subtract and do some multiplication. She has difficulties solving word problems. Rosie currently has a grade of 71% in math Writing Present Level Statements

113 Curriculum Based Assessments indicate Rosie can add and subtract within 100 to solve one-step words problems, involving “adding to”, “taking from”, etc. She has memorized the multiplication facts for 0 – 5 and 10. She is able to use a multiplication table for facts she does not have memorized. Classroom assessments demonstrate that Rosie can apply the correct operation when presented with the terms or symbols for “multiply”, and “divide”. Rosie cannot describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as a multiplication problem, such 35 = 5 groups of 7 objects. She is not able to interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison when given word problem, such as: “A pack of pencils costs 9 times as much as a single pencil, which costs 5 cents. How much is a pack?” Rosie’s disability impacts her ability to use multiplication equations to solve real world problems.

114 1.Are they related to the vision (desired outcome) for this student? 2. Do they reflect what the student knows in relation to the general curriculum or standards expectations? 3. Are they stated in measurable terms? 4.Do they include strengths, needs, and disability’s affect on access to the general curriculum? 5. Are they self-explanatory?

115  Using the IEP Handout A (student description) IEP Handout B, and the information you gathered in activity 2.1.1, through conversation (as a team) discuss and write a Present Level based on:  General curriculum considerations  Critical expectations specific to standard  Present Level Statements (academic and functional) that describe skills and knowledge  Strengths/needs  Impact Statement (how disability affects involvement/progress in the general education curriculum). IEP Handout A: Karen Blank IEP Goal Page Karen Student Profile

116 Remember… The Present Level of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance sets the stage for developing IEP goals!

117  Quick Check Quick Check

118 We cannot always build the future for our children Franklin D. Roosevelt. …but …but we can build our children for the future.

119 Module 3: Writing Quality Goals and Objectives

120 Desired Outcomes/ Instructional Results Write Measurable Goals Select Instructional Services & Program Supports Implement & Monitor Progress General Curriculum Expectations Current Skills and Knowledge Area of Instructional Need PLAAFP Statements on IEP Form Developing PLAAFP Statements

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122  Annual goals are related to needs resulting from the student’s disability that directly affect involvement and progress in the general education curriculum  For preschool children, as appropriate, to participate in age-appropriate activities

123 Annual Goals answer the question— “What should the student be doing?”

124  Are they:  Relevant?  Reasonable or attainable?  Challenging?  Attainable in time given?

125 Need to Know  Evaluate how an author uses words to create mental imagery, suggest mood and set tone Nice to Know  Recognize stylistic elements such as voice, tone and style Target a particular hole and fix it – that’s leverage!

126  If multiple areas of need are identified in the Present Level, the IEP Team must consider how each need impacts the students’ progress in the general education curriculum.  Select the need that has the greatest impact on progress, and develop a goal to address that need.

127  Annual goals are related to needs resulting from the student’s disability that directly affect involvement and progress in the general education curriculum.  (Preschool: As needed to participate in age- appropriate activities)

128  Developing SMART Goals S pecific based on PLAAFP M easurable progress determined at data points A chievable realistic, related to critical needs R esults-oriented developed with outcome in mind T ime-bound defined beginning/ending Developing SMART Goals Tina Student Profile and Goal Page

129  The Student...(Who)  Will do what…(Behavior)  To what level/degree…(Criterion)  Under what conditions…(Context)  In what length of time…(Timeframe)

130  Focus on what the student will do: “Janice will read and analyze a short story for the literary elements of main idea, point of view, plot, setting, and characterization.”  Not the process: “Janice will use a graphic organizer to analyze a short story.”

131  Use behavioral terminology: “Janice will read and analyze a short story for literary elements.”  Not the process: “Janice will review short stories.”

132  Add the criterion: “Janice will read and analyze a short story for literary elements of main idea, point of view, setting and characterization with 90% accuracy using a literature passage from the sixth grade classroom.”

133  Include the context/timefra me: “By the end of the school year, Janice will read and analyze a short story for literary elements of main idea, point of view, setting, and characterization with 90% accuracy using a literature passage from the sixth grade classroom.”

134  The student (Janice)  Will do what (read and analyze a short story)  To what level or degree (90% accuracy)  Under what conditions (sixth grade literature passage)  In what time frame (end of school year)

135 Refer to Present Level data: Ask what:  Are the performance expectations in the general classroom?  Has been the rate of growth?  Will it take to be successful in the general classroom?  Is the gap in current and desired skill?

136  What:  Are the criteria/expectations of the general curriculum for demonstrating mastery ?  Is necessary to ensure the skill is at a mastery level?  Are the expected gains over a year’s period of time?

137 A Present Level Example: “Karen is in the sixth grade; she has challenges with reading fluency which impact her ability to comprehend longer passages and summarize central themes in a text.” Reviewing What We Know Karen Student Profile IEP Handout A: Karen

138  Reviewing What We Know:  Area of need  Past instruction and progress  Experience with similar students/situations  Expectations for the next year Reviewing What We Know Karen Student Profile IEP Handout A

139  Make it better: When tested, Sara will read at the fifth grade level.

140  Make it better: When tested, Sara will read at the fifth grade level.  New and improved: Given a passage in the fifth grade literature book, Sara will read wpm with fewer than 5 errors in one minute in three consecutive trials over a three week period of time.

141  Make it better: June will turn in homework on time, complete in-class assignments, and complete tests given in class.

142  Make it better: June will turn in homework on time, complete in-class assignments, and complete tests given in class.  New and improved: June will meet all required classroom activities (including submitting homework on time, completion of in-class assignments, and completing tests) in accordance with classroom standards for maintaining a “C” or better letter grade for the class consistently for a time period of six months.

143  Make it better: Randy will have basic needs met by making appropriate requests to a variety of adults.

144  Make it better: Randy will have basic needs met by making appropriate requests to a variety of adults.  New and improved: Across all settings, Randy will use his communication system to indicate all needs (e.g., bathroom, drink or eat, go outside) throughout the school day for five consecutive days.

145  Use your data on Karen to write a SMART Goal tied to the reading standard:  RI.6.2: Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.  Carol B. Massanari IEP Handout A Karen Profile Page Karen Present Level IEP Handout A Karen Profile Page Karen Present Level

146 1. Read the IEP goal statements. 2. Are they SMART goals? S pecific M easurable A chievable R esults-oriented T ime-bound 3. Are they connected to the Present Level and include a reference to the standards? 4. Will the goal support the student’s ability to meet grade level standards and make progress in the general curriculum? SMART Goals Karen Goal Page

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148  Measurable  A logical breakdown of the major components of an annual goal

149  Short-term objectives and benchmarks are steps that measure the child's progress toward the annual goals in the IEP. When written correctly, short-term objectives provide teachers with a roadmap and a clear mechanism to evaluate the child's progress.  Could be incremental steps, or  A set of skills that together will lead to meeting the annual goal Adatped from Wright, P. and Wright, P. (2006). Wrightslaw: From Emotions to Advocacy, 2nd Edition. Hartfield, VA: Harbor House Law Press, Inc.

150  Given vowels, consonants, digraphs, and 5 common diphthongs, Jay will say the correct sounds at 30 sounds per minute with no more than 2 errors.  Given the 200 most common sight vocabulary words, Jay will read them aloud at 110 wpm with only random error.  Given first grade material, Jay will read a passage orally at wpm with no more than 5 errors.

151  By the end of the first reporting period, JJ will answer “who” questions.  By the end of the second reporting period, JJ will answer “what” questions.  By the end of the third reporting period, JJ will answer “where” questions.  By the end of the fourth reporting period, JJ will answer “why” questions.

152  Consider:  How expected progress will be determined?  What is the rate of growth expected from initiation of IEP to goal achievement?  What will be done if progress is not occurring?

153  Involves frequent, ongoing, systematic monitoring of performance  Occurs in core, supplemental, and intensive instruction with varied frequency  Answers whether or not:  Student is making progress compared to self, peers and/or the standard?  Instructional adjustments are needed?

154 Periodic Review of IEP Goals: Are we on track?  Is student making progress at the expected rate? Yes. Continue No. Adjust Even if you are on the right track, you’re still going to get run over if you don’t keep moving. Will Rogers

155 Periodic Review of IEP Goals: Are we on track?  Is student progressing at a higher rate than expected? Yes. Adjust intervention, continue for a while longer, or discontinue  Is student progressing slower than expected? Yes. Adjust frequency/intensity of, or select different intervention

156  Assessment: Strategies for Tracking and Reporting Progress Assessment Strategies for Tracking and Reporting Progress

157 Desired Outcomes/ Instructional Results Write Measurable Goals Select Instructional Services & Program Supports Implement & Monitor Progress General Curriculum Expectations Current Skills and Knowledge Area of Instructional Need PLAAFP Statements on IEP Form Developing PLAAFP Statements

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159 The modules used as a basis for developing this training can be found at The Standards-Based IEP module project was funded wholly or in part by the U.S. Department of Education under cooperative agreement S283B The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the position of the U.S. Department of Education and no official endorsement should be inferred.

160  Alabama Department of Education  uments.asp?section=65&sort=16&footer= sections

161 COUNCIL OF CHIEF STATE SCHOOL OFFICERS (CCSSO) & NATIONAL GOVERNORS ASSOCIATION CENTER FOR BEST PRACTICES (NGA CENTER) JUNE 2010

162 D emocracy does not guarantee equality, only equality of opportunity. -- Irving Kristol.


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