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Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network (PaTTAN) April 28, 2009 Credential of Competency Standard # 10: Collaboration.

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Presentation on theme: "Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network (PaTTAN) April 28, 2009 Credential of Competency Standard # 10: Collaboration."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network (PaTTAN) April 28, 2009 Credential of Competency Standard # 10: Collaboration

3 Pennsylvania’s Commitment to Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) Recognizing that the placement decision is an Individualized Education Program (IEP) team decision, our goal for each child is to ensure IEP teams begin with the general education setting with the use of Supplementary Aids and Services before considering a more restrictive environment.

4 NEWS FLASH!! Effective April 1, 2009, PA Department of Education, Bureau of Special Education will only accept Competency Assessment Checklists with original signatures from the supervisor or designee. This means blue ink Previous signatures can be initialed in blue ink by supervisor or designee

5 District, IU, Preschool, Agency Policy Your local district’s policies regarding paraeducator job descriptions, duties, and responsibilities provide the final word!

6 Standard #10: Collaboration K1. Common concerns of families of individuals with exceptional learning needs. K2. Roles of stakeholders in planning an individualized program. S1. Assist in collecting and providing objective, accurate information to professionals. S2. Collaborate with stakeholders as directed. S3. Foster respectful and beneficial relationships. S4. Participate as directed in conferences as members of the educational team. S5. Function in a manner that demonstrates a positive regard for the distinctions between roles and responsibilities of paraeducators and those of professionals.

7 Agenda Roles and Responsibilities of Stakeholders in Planning an Individualized Education Program (IEP) Fostering Respectful and Beneficial Relationships Including Understanding Common Concerns of Families Collaboration: Working as a Team! Being a Positive and Contributing Member of the School Community

8 Learner Outcomes Participants will: Know roles of all participants, including paraprofessionals, in planning an individualized program for a student with a disability. Recognize common concerns of families of individuals with exceptional learning needs. Assist in collecting and providing objective, accurate information to professionals. Collaborate with stakeholders as directed. Foster respectful and beneficial relationships. Function in a manner that demonstrates a positive regard for the distinctions between roles and responsibilities of paraeducators and those of professionals.

9 The Individualized Education Program Your Role in the IEP Process…

10 The IEP Process How do students qualify for Special Education? Evaluation Referral Evaluation Team Gather Information Write Evaluation Report

11 The IEP Process Determining eligibility The Evaluation Team answers two questions: 1.Does the child have a disability? 2.Does the child need specially designed instruction?

12 Disability Categories Autism Deaf-blindness Deafness Emotional Disturbance Hearing Impairment Mental Retardation Multiple Disabilities Orthopedic Impairment Other Health Impairment Specific Learning Disability Speech/Language Impairment Traumatic Brain Injury Visual Impairment

13 The IEP Process IEP Development: The Evaluation Report (ER) Includes information about: Where the student is now What the student’s strengths are now What the students needs are now

14 The IEP Process IEP Development: The Special Education Program The IEP: Outlines goals and supports needed for the student to live, work, and play in the community Is directly related to the general education curriculum

15 The IEP Process How is the IEP Developed? Based on the Evaluation Report Written by the IEP Team Paraeducator’s role IEP Form

16 The IEP Process IEP Development: The IEP Team Special Education Teacher Regular Education Teacher Parents LEA Representative Student if appropriate Vo-tech rep., if appropriate

17 The IEP Process Writing the IEP Look at Evaluation Report Where the child is presently functioning Determine annual goals and short term objectives

18 The IEP Process Writing the IEP Decide what supports are needed Discuss where services will be provided

19 The IEP Process The Paraeducator’s Role May attend meetings May provide information for team

20 The IEP Process IEP Implementation What is taught Where it is taught How it is taught Who teaches it Paraeducator’s role

21 The IEP Process Progress Monitoring Data is gathered to: See if students are on track to meet their goals Adjust instruction if not on track Make decisions at IEP meetings Report progress to parents

22 The IEP Process Reevaluation Use data collected during Progress monitoring IEP team decides if additional information is needed Report is written and used to write a new IEP

23 The IEP Process Let’s take a brief look at some of the important parts of the IEP form…

24 Fostering Respectful and Beneficial Relationships With Families

25 Interacting with Families Importance of Families They know the child best. They are involved with the child’s educational program throughout their entire school career. They have responsibility for the child’s care and well-being.

26 Interacting with Families Role of the Family Informed decision makers in all aspects of special education program planning Equal and important team members regarding decisions about their child’s education

27 Interacting with Families Families and Educators Working Together Parents can be an educator’s greatest ally. The special education process is complex. It is critical to share a focus on instructional goals to promote the student’s independence.

28 Interacting with Families In the Classroom Be sure parents know who you are and who the teacher is. Be friendly and professional. Defer questions about child’s education to the teacher. Before sending home-school communication books home, have teachers review items written by you.

29 Interacting with Families Before, during, and after school Be prepared for questions or discussions outside of the school day!

30 Interacting with Families Tools for Challenging Situations Anticipate situations Collect ideas for what to do or say

31 Interacting with Families Families want information or help. Families share information with you. Families ask you to do something in the classroom that is not consistent with the student’s written plan You perceive that families are angry or upset.

32 Interacting with Families Challenging Situation #1: The family asks you for information about educational progress.

33 Interacting with Families Challenging Situation #2: The family wants your help.

34 Interacting with Families Challenging Situation #3: The family shares personal information with you.

35 Interacting with Families Challenging Situation #4: The family directs you how to do something related to the child’s educational plan.

36 Interacting with Families Challenging Situation #5: Families confront you with statements expressing dissatisfaction or anger.

37 Interacting with Families Positive Comments

38 Positive Things to Say: I enjoy working with your child. Sam always tries his best. We are all proud of his accomplishments. Sally is helpful to her classmates. Joe is always willing to try something new.

39 Interacting with Families Avoid judgment or opinions and decisions of families Anticipate situations and consider possible responses Remove yourself from conflict situations or seek help from your partner teacher You are an important person in the lives of many children.

40 Collaboration: Working as a Team!

41 Activity Boggle Game

42 What did Boggle Teach Us ?

43 Collaboration: Stages of Teaming TEAM A number of people associated together in work or activity to function collaboratively

44 Stages of Teaming Forming Storming Norming Performing

45 Collaboration: Stages of Teaming Stage 1: Forming _______, anticipation, and ______, but members are somewhat _________about the team and _______ about the task ahead.

46 Collaboration: Stages of Teaming Stage 1: Forming Excitement, anticipation, and optimism, but members are somewhat tentative about the team and anxious about the task ahead.

47 Collaboration: Stages of Teaming Stage 2: Storming _________to the task and fluctuations in attitude about the team.

48  Stage 2: Storming Resistance to the task and fluctuations in attitude about the team. Collaboration: Stages of Teaming

49 Stage 3: Norming _________of “team” and progress on accomplishing the project.

50 Collaboration: Stages of Teaming Stage 3: Norming Acceptance of “team” and progress on accomplishing the project.

51 Collaboration: Stages of Teaming Stage 4: Performing “One singular sensation” Acceptance, Progress, ___________

52 Collaboration: Stages of Teaming Stage 4: Performing “One singular sensation” Acceptance, Progress, Satisfaction

53 Consider…

54 Being a Good Team Member

55 The Four Knows Know yourself Know your fellow team members Know your students Know your stuff

56 Interacting Positively With Other Adults In the Class Use effective communication strategies Active listener Objective reporting Be aware of “filters”

57 Interacting Positively With Other Adults In the Class Be responsible, honest, loyal and show integrity

58 Interacting Positively With Other Adults In the Class Learn to give and receive compliments

59 Interacting Positively with Others In the Entire School What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas! Treat others with respect Recognize the levels of authority and sphere of influence Obey school rules

60 Resolving Conflicts When They Occur

61 Resolving Conflicts (cont.) Use “I” messages the feeling the situation the reason “I feel__________when________ because____________.”

62 Resolving Conflicts (cont.) Find a good time to talk Listen carefully, speak carefully Take the time to get at the real problem Focus on what you can do to solve the conflict Take action and evaluate the situation over time

63 Collaboration: Problem-Solving Five-Step Problem-Solving Process 1.Identify and describe the problem 2.Determine the cause of the problem 3.Decide on a goal and identify alternative solutions 4.Select a course of action 5.Implement and evaluate the solution

64 Resolving Conflicts (cont.) Once an issue has been resolved LET IT GO! And help things get back to normal

65 What We Can Learn From Geese? —excerpted from What Do You Think? by Darrell Sifford

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71 Learner Outcomes Participants will: Recognize common concerns of families of individuals with exceptional learning needs. Know roles of all participants, including paraprofessionals, in planning an individualized program for a student with a disability. Assist in collecting and providing objective, accurate information to professionals. Collaborate with stakeholders as directed. Foster respectful and beneficial relationships. Function in a manner that demonstrates a positive regard for the distinctions between roles and responsibilities of paraeducators and those of professionals.

72 Summer Paraeducator Institute August 18-19, 2009 PaTTAN King of Prussia PaTTAN Harrisburg PaTTAN Pittsburgh Selected Downlink sites 2 ½ hours of training each morning and afternoon for a total of 10 hours

73 Afterschool Videoconferences October 13, 2009 November 17, 2009 February 10, 2010 March 10, 2010 April 28, :15-6:15 pm

74 Edward G. Rendell Gerald L. Zahorchak, D.Ed. Governor Secretary Diane Castelbuono, Deputy Secretary Office of Elementary and Secondary Education John J. Tommasini, Director Bureau of Special Education Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network Contact Information: Name of Consultant, address


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