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Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training What is an IEP? How can it help me? Be All That You Can BE With your IEP! Developed by: Rachel Faish.

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Presentation on theme: "Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training What is an IEP? How can it help me? Be All That You Can BE With your IEP! Developed by: Rachel Faish."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training What is an IEP? How can it help me? Be All That You Can BE With your IEP! Developed by: Rachel Faish & Jenna McGlaughlin with help from: Erika Kauffman, John Krueger, & Leah Maxson

3 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training About this unit: This is a “student friendly” presentation To help middle-school deaf and hard-of-hearing students prepare to participate in IEP and transition planning meetings To give teachers ideas for teaching these skills So..., here we go!

4 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training So What is an IEP? An IEP is a plan to ensure that you are receiving a good education that fits YOUR needs It helps your teachers and parents make sure that you are on the right track It is a plan that YOU are allowed to attend, because it is all about YOU and YOUR needs! So, start thinking…what are your strengths, your weaknesses…, your likes, your dislikes—who are you?

5 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training Do you think about…? What class(es) do you like? What class(es) do you dislike? What would you change if you could about your school life?

6 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training How can you help plan your life? Your IEP is really for you even if you haven’t attended IEP meetings. Start by listing classes and things about school that you like and dislike— and write them down in a notebook. Think of goals that you would like to work on for the school year, that will help you in the future. Talk to your parents, your teachers, and your friends about what they think—what are your strengths, and what are you good at Look at your old IEPs and think about how YOU can help plan…, for your life!

7 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training So what is an IEP meeting? Why do you need to start thinking about it? An IEP meeting includes people who are concerned about your education. The IEP team discusses what has been successful for you in school, and what has not. Then the team decides on a plan to help you, so that you can be more successful. This unit will help you learn about this plan to help your team make plans that really fit you! I LIKE THE IEP! IT WORKS FOR ME IT HELPS ME TO BE ALL I CAN BE

8 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training What to “watch out” for with IEP meetings: Disagreements: You might disagree with another person on the team. It’s best to be “mature” and find ways to solve the problem—don’t just be mad ! Explaining your opinion and listening to others: It is your plan so your opinion is important. But other people have good ideas, too. For example, screaming at your parents about something is not appropriate. Listen, and explain nicely why you disagree. Be Part of the IEP And it’s as Easy as 1-2-3

9 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training The Meeting Meter Excited Happy Confused Disappointed Angry Thrilled Very Interested Delighted, Glad Very Pleased Unclear, Uncertain, Puzzled What I hoped for didn’t happen Upset, Unhappy Furious, Annoyed

10 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training Learn how to make your IEP meeting more successful! Have a practice IEP meeting and videotape it. –Evaluate your skills: How did you feel during the meeting? Use the Meeting Meter to help you describe how you felt, and why. What did you do well? What made you feel happy and excited? What did you do well? Where should you improve? Practice: –Explaining more about your likes and dislikes –Listening more to others on the team

11 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training Use these 11 steps for a “Self-Determined IEP”, that YOU help create 1. Begin the meeting by stating its purpose. 2. Introduce everyone. 3. Review past goals and performance. 4. Ask for others ’ feedback. 5. State your school and transition goals. 6. Ask questions if you do not understand. 7. Deal with differences in opinion. 8. State what supports you will need. 9. Summarize your goals. 10. Close meeting by thanking everyone. 11. Work on IEP goals all year. [From Choicemaker Series, Sopris Pub.]

12 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training Meeting Meter Use this “Meeting Meter” to help you think about your IEP meeting. Practice first with a “mock” IEP meeting. –How do you react if someone disagrees? Think about and describe the following: –How did you feel about the persons invited to the meeting— did they help? –Did everyone listen to your opinions? Did you listen to their ideas? –Did they have good ideas, even if they disagreed with you?

13 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training Meter Questions (cont.) How did you feel when the IEP team discussed how you have done in school—your strengths and your weaknesses? –Were you embarrassed or shy? –Were you angry or upset? How do you feel about the new goals the team discussed? –Are you satisfied? –Do you think they should be changed? How do you feel about your behavior during the meeting? –Were there any problems? –Were you mature and respectful? How do you feel about the ideas and opinions that you shared with the others in the meeting? –Did they listen to you? –Are there goals where you helped?

14 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training Teacher’s Section: Developing and Using the Unit Student Section: –To help motivate and engage students through the overarching unit questions –To provide visual and instructional prompts and support for instruction Teacher Section: –To provide unit design information including possible state standards and outcomes-based assessments Work is based upon Understanding by Design’s research-based practices and processes –To provide further description of possible lessons and activities The next 6 slides show the three stages of unit design applied to this unit.

15 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training Teacher’s Section: Using the Three Stages of Understanding by Design Stage ONE: –Identify external standards and overall unit goals that are relevant to the students’ strengths and needs –Incorporate these standards and goals to create relevant, authentic questions that “hook” students and address any key misunderstandings Stage TWO: –Develop assessments that demonstrate thorough unit learning by using the Six Facets of Understanding Stage THREE: –Develop learning activities that develop the knowledge and skills needed to successfully complete the assessments and to demonstrate thorough unit understanding

16 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training Stage ONE: Applying Relevant Content Standards Ohio Department of Education Middle School Standards Science: Standards-Based Strategies: oStudents develop scientific habits by asking valid questions, and gathering and analyzing information oStudents are able to demonstrate the ability to communicate their findings to others. Activities & Standards: o Students compare data from self- rating and teacher rating scales to evaluate differences oStudents use comparison and contract strategies to explain the differences between the rating scale results oStudents explain the differences between observation and inference. (6 th Grade) Language Arts: Standards-Based Strategies: oStudents gain information from reading for the purposes of learning about a subject, doing a job, making decisions and accomplishing a task oStudents use their knowledge of text structure to organize content information, analyze it and draw inferences from it. Activities & Standards: o Students read the 11 steps and use them to make decisions for accomplishing the IEP task o Students review the videotapes and analyze by giving examples of cause and effect and fact and opinion. (6 th Grade)

17 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training Content Standards (cont.) Writing: Standards-Based Strategies: oStudents regularly engage in the major phases of the writing process which includes: prewriting, drafting, revising, editing and publishing o Students plan their writing for different purposes and audiences. Activities & Standards: oEstablish a thesis statement for informational writing or a plan for narrative writing. (6 th Grade) o Determine a purpose and audience (6 th Grade) o Use precise language, action verbs, sensory details, colorful modifiers and style as appropriate to audience and purpose. (7 th Grade) o Vary simple, compound and complex sentence structures. (7 th Grade) o Use resources and reference materials (e.g., dictionaries and thesauruses) to select more effective vocabulary. (8 th Grade) Communications: Standards-Based Strategies: oStudents are exposed to good models and have frequent opportunities for practice oStudents deliver presentations that effectively convey information and persuade their audiences o Students gain proficiency in controlling language, deliberately choose vocabulary to clarify, and adjust presentations according to audience and purpose. Activities & Standards: oDemonstrate active listening strategies (e.g., asking focused questions, responding to cues, making visual contact). (6 th Grade) o Summarize the main idea and draw conclusions from presentations. (6 th Grade) o Use clear diction and tone, and adjust volume, phrasing and tempo to stress important ideas. (6 th Grade) o Adjust speaking content and style according to the needs of the situation, setting and audience. (6 th Grade) o Deliver persuasive presentations that: a. establish a clear position; b. include relevant evidence to support a position and to address counter-arguments; and c. consistently use common organizational structures as appropriate (e.g., cause-effect, compare-contrast). (7 th Grade)

18 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training Stage TWO: Understanding By Design’s Six Facets of Understanding (Wiggins & McTighe, 1998) FacetActivityDesired Outcomes Facet 1: Explanation Student watches videotape and describes the purpose of an IEP meeting. Student is given a list of the 11 steps of an IEP. Thoroughly explains the purpose of an IEP meeting and how it pertains to him/her Student will thoroughly describe each of the 11 steps and how they facilitate student involvement in developing the plan Facet 2: Interpretation Students will give examples of how doing, or not doing appropriately, each of the 11 steps may affect the IEP process and outcome The student will give realistic and insightful, age-appropriate examples of how each of the 11 steps can affect the process (interrelationships among the team) and outcomes (goals that reflect perceived maturity and readiness) of the IEP. Facet 3: Application Participate in a mock IEP meeting and then a real IEP meeting Student will demonstrate increasing abilities to effectively use the 11 steps to participate in IEP meetings Facet 4: Perspective Given real or mock scenarios, students will describe the perspectives of different team members, including those who disagree. Students will demonstrate insight into reasons and beliefs that support different team members’ opinions Facet 5: Empathy Students will describe, and demonstrate through role play, feelings of different team members who disagree. Student will suggest appropriate ways to resolve disagreements based on perspective and empathy. Students will demonstrate increasingly perceptive and insightful understandings and portrayals of team members; students will suggest increasingly empathetic and appropriate ways to resolve disagreements. Facet 6: Self- Knowledge Students will use the meeting meter to evaluate their own feelings, and identify strengths and weaknesses. Students will rate themselves on the 11 steps The student will be able to understand his/her feelings and actions towards others and hopefully be able to control and modify them in the future

19 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training Using the Six Facets to collect evidence of the students’ knowledge and skills about IEP meetings Student watches a video on the IEP process (e.g., Choicemaker Series on “Self-Determined IEP) and describes the purpose of an IEP meeting, and how it can help him/her work with the IEP team. Student can describe and/or demonstrate proper behavior for an IEP meeting, and how to express opinions. Student can describe and/or demonstrate proper ways to express oneself during disagreements: –Can suggest practical steps for conflict- resolution for real or mock scenarios Student demonstrates increasing skills in formulating and clarifying an idea, and presenting that idea to a group Student can identify some possible, realistic long and short-term goals and present these at an upcoming IEP meeting Student can explain who will attend their IEP meeting and why they attend –Student identifies those who must, and those who are optional to attend –Student sends a personal invitations to each and records their responses and informs the team coordinator Student participates in a mock, and then a real IEP/transition meeting, and demonstrates increasing abilities across the 11 steps (using rating scales)

20 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training IEP Unit Development Review Stage One: –Uses authentic and life-long student needs (e.g., to participate meaningfully in IEP and adult agency meetings), with –State standards, –To develop inquiry-based overarching unit questions (and unit goals) that drive and focus the unit’s: Assessment of outcomes and Lessons and instructional activities to support the outcomes assessments Stage Two: –Uses the overarching unit questions and goals to ensure assessment and documentation of outcomes –Use the Six Facets of Understanding to demonstrate thorough, depth of learning

21 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training Unit Development Process Summary Use Stage One’s: –overarching and enduring understandings –which incorporate and unpack external standards, To plan Stage Two’s: –assessments to collect evidence of these understandings, –across the Six Facets, Which are supported by Stage Three’s: –learning experiences and instructional activities that ensure that students have the necessary skills and knowledge to fully and effectively demonstrate these understandings across each of the Six Facets.

22 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training Stage THREE: Suggested Teaching Activities Use Choicemaker video to introduce students to IEP participation & the 11 step process Students identify their strengths and needs, and use these to develop long and short term goals Students practice presenting goals and ideas to the class and to others, in a clear and “professional” manner Students participate in a mock IEP meeting and use some or all of the 11 steps Students identify and select individuals to attend IEP meeting, send invitations and track responses Students demonstrate increasingly mature and appropriate behavior at mock and real IEPs, including listening and conflict resolution skills Students self evaluate using the Meeting Meter and the 11-step rating forms, and compare their own with teacher ratings

23 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training Stage THREE: Suggested Lesson Ideas COMPLETED LESSON PLANS: Communication Skill: Identifying IEP Members Writing: Sending IEP Invitations Social Studies: IEP Conflict Resolution ADDITIONAL LESSON IDEA: Students rate their IEP participation, and –Compare these ratings with those of their teacher –Develop perspective skills and objectivity –Develop and practice strategies to improve for future meetings.

24 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training Lesson Plan: Identifying IEP Team Members Activity: Identifying members in preparation for Steps 1-2 of Self-Determined IEP (11 steps). Behavioral Objectives: Each student will be able to identify both required and optional members of their IEP team at a mock and/or real IEP meeting with 80% accuracy for their names, titles, and roles. Related objective: Each student will correctly introduce ALL IEP members at mock and real IEP meetings, including each person’s name and title with 80% accuracy. Prerequisite Knowledge: IEP meeting and its purpose, roles of typical school personnel Lesson Procedure: (1) Introduction (motivation, engagement, review of prior learnings): Engage the students and review by asking questions such as, What is an IEP and how can it help you be more successful? If you could choose people to help you plan your future, who would you include? (2) Steps for learning (development and key questions): Probe and scaffold student’s learning to identify (a) who is required to attend an IEP meeting and why (their role), (b) who may also be invited to attend and why (their role). Ask students to identify both required and optional persons important to attend their own IEP meeting, their names, title, and role (students can work in pairs or groups then check each other’s work). (3) Culmination (review of today's learnings and links to future lessons): Review names, titles, and roles of persons. Have students practice using a matching game to help them remember (if needed). Adaptations: Allow students to work individually or in groups, to research IEP attendance requirements, interview administrators and others about their IEP roles and responsibilities. Provide more assistance or ask students to identify only one person to attend meetings, compile these into full listing, use pictures and cues about school personnel and roles as needed. Strategies/evidence for evaluation: Worksheet/Board accuracy (75% correct); Correct name cards Follow-up: Explain/discuss how other professionals may need to attend some students’ IEPs depending upon needs (audiologists, speech therapists, OT/PTs, etc). Practice and model correct ways to introduce the team members and use this to build skills for completing Steps 1-2 of the 11-step process. Explain/discuss how students can use this skill at other meetings as well

25 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training Lesson Plan: Sending IEP Invitations Activity: Sending invitations (and cover letter) for the IEP/Transition Meeting Behavioral Objectives: Students will use the sample invitation format to type invitations to the IEP members with 90% accuracy for spelling and format. Students will track the responses from invitations regarding who is/is not able to attend the meeting at the identified time with 90% accuracy and report this to the IEP team coordinator each week. Prerequisite Knowledge: Background on reason for IEP meetings; correct spelling and spellcheck using word processing; correct paragraph form, prior lesson on persons to attend IEP meetings, use of checklist for data collection. Lesson Procedure: (a) Introduction: Review persons to attend IEP meeting and their role. Probe about how to inform/ask persons to attend (written invitation). Inform students they will be sending invitations and tracking the responses, and informing the IEP team coordinator. (b) Steps for Learning: Ask students to identify key information to be included on an invitation (students may work in pairs to develop a sample, then whole class evaluates and revises). Develop sample form (see form that follows) or allow students to independently develop forms to use. Have students use list of individuals from “Identifying Team Members” lesson to fill in forms. [Optional addition: have students develop a cover letter to team to explain their role in participating in the IEP meeting, and the 11 steps they will follow, as increasing their own self-determination and responsibility for their own future.] Demonstrate how to develop checklist of individuals, how to collect data, and to whom the data should be reported. (c) Culmination: Have students use spellcheck, have students review each other’s work for format and spelling of person’s names. Have students send invitations, track the responses, and report to team coordinator. Adaptations: Students can be give more, or less, structure in completing their work and in tracking and reporting the responses. Students or teacher can create cover letter using business letter format and paragraphing (salutation, introduction, body, closing, etc.). Strategies/Evidence for Evaluation: Proper format, spelling of names, all individuals included and tracked. Follow-Up: Make follow-up contacts for individuals who have not responded by deadline, send reminders and track.

26 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training Sample Invitation Format Dear _(Person’s Name you want to come), Your presence is requested at (name and address of your school). For an Individualized Education planning meeting for (Your name)____________ Date: ( month/day/year of the meeting) Time: ( hour: minute) a.m. / p.m. Room: ( room number ) R.S.V.P. to ( this is French and means to please let you know if they can or cannot come to the meeting Before ( month/day/year—deadline to tell you) Thank you for your support in my education. Sincerely, (your signature goes here) Dear ____________________, Your presence is requested at ___________________________ For an Individualized Education planning meeting for __________________________ Date: _______________ Time: ___________a.m. / p.m. Room: ____________ R.S.V.P. to _________________________ Before ______________________ Thank you for your support in my education. Sincerely,

27 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training Invitation Response Checklist Who 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Date Invitation Mailed Date Response Received Attendance (Yes/No) Role [Student logs each invitation made: when mailed, when response received, and nature of response. Student reports results to teacher and administrator (principal) prior to the meeting.]

28 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training Lesson Plan: IEP Conflict Resolution Activity: Learning appropriate listening, problem and conflict resolution skills Behavioral Objective: The students will develop at least one positive solution by using the five steps for solving conflicts, with 4/5 steps correct. Prerequisite knowledge: Memory of prior conflicts with peers and adults, ability to analyze feelings and behaviors. Lesson Procedure: (a) Introduction: Ask students about prior conflicts they have had with peers, siblings, or adults, or provide a scenario about a conflict similar to ones they have had. Discuss the outcomes of these conflicts, both positive and negative. Ask if they can think of ways to help resolve conflicts and disagreements more positively. Ask about how they believe disagreements are resolved at IEP meetings (formal settings). (b) Steps for learning: Present conflict-resolution steps: Step one, Identify the problem: What caused the conflict? What was said or done that led to the conflict? Step two, Propose solutions (brainstorm): Identify several solutions that could solve the conflict or problem. Step three, evaluate your ideas: Decide which solutions are better than others. Rank them if needed. Step four, Try out your solution: Use role play and practice better responses. Prepare to use in “real” situations with others. Ask for others’ feedback. Step five, evaluate your solution: Did the solution work? Could the result be improved? Ask for others’ feedback also. Revise and repeat steps four and five. Present practice scenarios involving conflict and differences of opinions with peers and adults. Have students role play these for the rest of the class. Ask students to use the five steps to analyze the problem and develop solutions.

29 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training IEP Conflict Resolution (cont.) (b) Steps for learning (cont) Break students into small groups and give each group a scenario (or have students develop their own scenarios). Have each group use the five steps to identify possible positive solutions Have each group present their solutions and have the class give feedback. Continue giving students practice scenarios as needed to develop skills. Include scenarios that are increasingly similar to situations they will face in IEP meetings, for example: adults in the meeting recommend that student take classes that they do not prefer, or recommend activities that the student dislikes. Practice good listening skills (to correctly identify the conflict) and creating positive solutions. (c) Culmination: Have students review the five-step process and how it leads to positive solutions. Discuss how it helps students participate effectively in IEP meetings. Adaptations: Have students develop their own scenarios, have them implement the 5 steps in their daily life—with family and friends and log or journal about each incident. Strategies/evidence for evaluation: Students are able to generate at least one positive solution for each conflict, students show increasing skills in applying this process to their daily lives. Follow-up: Discuss/describe how this process can be applied as conflict situations arise in school, discuss how process can be used in various work and adult situations, have students use process in mock and real IEPs and evaluate their solutions.

30 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training IEP Student Participation Evaluation Forms Transition Services Preparation for Teachers of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students Student Participation in IEP/Transition Meetings Student Questionnaire My Name: __________________________ My IEP Date:________________________ 1. I explained the reason or purpose (why) of the meeting.___ NO ___YES 2. I knew ________ people at my IEP meeting. I introduced ________ people to each other at my IEP meeting. (number or “all”) (number or “all”) 3. I talked about my past goals and how well I was doing: ___ NO ___YES: 1 2 3 4 5+ things (circle number of things said) 4. I asked for feedback about my goals and how well I was doing: ___ NO ___YES 5. I talked about my current school and transition goals: ___ NO ___YES: 1 2 3 4 5+ things (circle number of things said) 6. I didn’t understand some things: ___ (or) I understood everything: ___ I asked questions about things I didn’t understand: ___ NO ___YES: 1 2 3 4 5+ things (circle number of things asked)

31 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training Student Participation Evaluation (cont.) Transition Services Preparation for Teachers of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students Student Participation in IEP/Transition Meetings Student Questionnaire 7. I disagreed with someone at the meeting: ___ NO ___YES I explained my reasons why I disagreed: ___ NO ___YES: 1 2 3 4 5+ things (circle number of things explained) 8. I talked about help I needed with some of my transition goals: ___ NO ___YES: 1 2 3 4 5+ things (circle number of things said) 9. I helped or I summarized my IEP goals: ___ NO ___YES: 1 2 3 4 5+ things (circle number of things said) 10. I helped or I ended the IEP meeting by thanking ________ people. (number or “all”) 11. I will work on my IEP goals all year. The first thing I will do is:_________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________.

32 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training Teacher Evaluation Form Transition Services Preparation for Teachers of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students Student Participation in IEP/Transition Meetings Teacher Questionnaire Student:_________________________IEP Meeting:________________________ 1. Student stated the reason or purpose of the meeting. 2. Student knew _______ people at the IEP meeting.Student introduced _______ people at the IEP meeting. (number or “all”) (number or “all”) 3. Student talked about past goals and how well s/he was doing: ___ (# of things said). 4. Student asked for feedback about goals and how well s/he was doing:___ (# of things said). 5. Student talked about current school and transition goals: ___ (# of things said). 6. Student asked ___ (# ) questions about things s/he didn’t understand or ___ (check) understood everything.

33 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training Teacher Evaluation Form (cont.) Transition Services Preparation for Teachers of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students Student Participation in IEP/Transition Meetings Teacher Questionnaire 7. Student disagreed with someone (___ NO ___YES) and explained his/her reasons: ___ (# of things said). 8. Student talked about help needed with some goals:___ (# of things said). 9. Student helped to, or summarized his/her IEP goals: ___ (# of things said). 10. Student helped or ended the IEP meeting by thanking ________ people. (number or “all”) 11. Student can identify steps to work on 1 st (___Yes/___No) and subsequent (___Yes/___No) IEP goals. Based upon the student’s communication, cognitive, and other abilities, s/he did: (circle one) very well / well / satisfactorily / not well / poorly because:_____________________________________________________________________________________.

34 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training Other Resources NICHCY: A Student’s Guide to the IEP by Marcy McGahee- Kovac, 2002 (www.nichcy.org)www.nichcy.org –Identifying strengths, needs, and accommodations (p. 8) NICHCY: Technical Assistance Guide, Helping Students Develop Their IEPs, January 2002. –Forms, strategies, and suggestions Reiman, J. Bullis, & Davis, C. (no date). Transition competency battery for deaf and hard of hearing adolescents and young adults. Santa Barbara, CA: James Stanfield Co. –Six transition (video) subtests normed on D/HH students: Job seekingWork adjustment Job related/interpersonal skillsMoney management Health/homeCommunity awareness

35 Spring 2005Transition Services Preparation & Training References Choicemaker Series: Self-Determined IEP by Martin and Marshall, Sopris West, Pub. Martin, J. E., & Marshall, L. H. (1998). ChoiceMaker: Choosing, planning and taking action. In M. L. Wehmeyer & D. J. Sands (Eds.), Making it happen: student involvement in education planning, decision making, and instruction (pp. 211-240). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes. Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.


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