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Dyslexia An Introduction Provided by: WCSSSD Kayla Berger: School Psychologist Stephen Parigi: LDT-C Cassandra Weinschenk: Social Worker.

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Presentation on theme: "Dyslexia An Introduction Provided by: WCSSSD Kayla Berger: School Psychologist Stephen Parigi: LDT-C Cassandra Weinschenk: Social Worker."— Presentation transcript:

1 Dyslexia An Introduction Provided by: WCSSSD Kayla Berger: School Psychologist Stephen Parigi: LDT-C Cassandra Weinschenk: Social Worker

2 Today’s Workshop will cover : Screening, Intervention, Accommodations, and Assistive Technology What is this law? Where did it come from? Who does this effect? What do the experts say? How can we help? Rethinking “Dyslexia”… dispelling the myths and stigma

3  Law #1 Incorporates the definition of dyslexia into the Administrator’s code:  Dyslexia is a specific learning disability that is neurological in origin. It is characterized by difficulties with accurate and/or fluent word recognition and by poor spelling and decoding abilities. These difficulties typically result from a deficit in the phonological component of language that is often unexpected in relation to other cognitive abilities and the provision of effective classroom instruction. Secondary consequences may include problems in reading comprehension and reduced reading experience that can impede growth of vocabulary and background knowledge. New legislation that affects screening, evaluation, and remediation

4  Dyslexia is a specific learning disability that is neurological in origin.  It is characterized by difficulties with accurate and/or fluent word recognition and by poor spelling and decoding abilities.  What is Dyslexia? Video What is Dyslexia? What does that mean?

5  These difficulties typically result from a deficit in the phonological component of language that is often unexpected in relation to other cognitive abilities and the provision of effective classroom instruction.

6  Secondary consequences may include problems in  reading comprehension  reduced reading experience  Impeding growth of vocabulary and background knowledge. Reading is such a struggle that there is little room left for enjoyment, comprehension, or knowledge acquisition. Finally…

7  Requires a minimum of 2 HOURS of professional development each year on the screening, intervention, accommodation, and use of technology for students with reading disabilities, including dyslexia.  general education teachers K-3  special education, basic skills  ESL teachers and reading specialists  LDT/Cs, and speech-language specialists Law #2

8  NJDOE will provide districts with information on screening tools, as well as guide boards on the proper interventions for those diagnosed. As of yet there is no information related to suggested screenings on the DOE website  Screenings will be mandatory by  Screening should be completed by end of 1 st semester of second grade Law #3

9 Most early childhood teachers already use reading screening or assessment tools in their classrooms. Examples are: DRA DIBELS Fountas and Pinnell Screening and Assessment

10  There is a localized impairment in the left hemisphere temporal lobe in the phonological module of the brain, which is the area of the brain responsible for processing sound elements.  This is directly responsible for delays in phonemic awareness The Dyslexic Brain

11 Phonemic awareness: ability to hear, identify, and manipulate phonemes which is central to learning to read and spell. It is an auditory training process that does not involve print. Phonics connect print (letters) to sound The Dyslexic BrainThe Dyslexic Brain video A little review:

12  Dyslexia is common and effects up to 20% of the population  Dyslexia occurs on a continuum or spectrum  It is a lifelong disorder – strategies are designed to help compensate for, not cure dyslexia Facts and Figures….

13  Dyslexia is a neurological problem, not a visual or perceptual problem.  An accurate diagnosis can be made by a medical professional by the time a child turns 6 years old.  It effects people in every language.  A student’s ability to perform mathematical calculations may also be impaired (dyscalculia). Dyslexia: a hidden disability Other Facts

14  80-85% of SLD students have a form of dyslexia (remember, it’s a continuum and some cases are more severe than others)  Dyslexia may be co-morbid with executive functioning disorders such as ADHD  There is a proportionally high number of artists, creative thinkers, and scientists who are dyslexic! Did you know….

15  Students may display delays in processing speed, fluency, spelling, writing, or speaking. THESE STUDENTS MAY NEVER REVERSE LETTERS!  Students may also demonstrate difficulty with the rapid naming of letters and sight words, reading comprehension, and synonyms/ antonyms. Signs and Symptoms

16  Some dyslexics have difficulty keeping up with conversations due to their difficulty processing verbal information.  Dyslexics have difficulty understanding jokes, proverbs, or sarcasm. …continued

17 All of these effects can have a big impact on a person's self-image.big impact on a person's self-image Without help, children often get frustrated with learning. The stress of dealing with schoolwork often makes children with dyslexia lose the motivation to continue schooling. Interview with Henry WinklerInterview with Henry Winkler video The result…

18 Warning signs So what do we do now? Reflect on students you teach… have taught… or will teach….... What can I do differently?

19  Recognizing letters, matching letters to sounds and blending sounds into speech  Pronouncing words, for example saying “mawn lower” instead of “lawn mower”  Learning and correctly using new vocabulary words  Learning the alphabet, numbers, and days of the week or similar common word sequences  Rhyming Young children may demonstrate trouble with:

20  Mastering the rules of spelling  Remembering facts and numbers  Handwriting or difficulty gripping the pencil correctly  Learning and understanding new skills; instead, relying heavily on memorization  Reading and spelling, such as reversing letters (d, b) or moving letters around (left, felt)  Following a sequence of directions  Trouble with word problems in math School-Age children may demonstrate trouble with:

21 Teenagers and adults may demonstrate trouble with:  Reading at the expected level  Understanding non-literal language, such as idioms, jokes, or proverbs  Reading aloud  Organizing and managing time  Trouble summarizing a story  Learning a foreign language  Memorizing

22  Remember, dyslexia occurs on a continuum. Some students may have a very mild case of dyslexia and may have found compensation strategies all on their own.  Recall 20% of the population may be affected by dyslexia.  In a class of 20 that is 4 students! Sound familiar?

23 Strategies and interventions What do we do?

24 The clock is ticking  Developmental window for reading instruction is closed by the end of 3 rd grade

25 Remediation techniques Can we do this? How can we address this in our classrooms? Research-based reading programs such as  Orton-Gillingham  Project Read  Wilson (Fundations) Have been proven to be successful in remediating learning delays. Remediation

26  Highlighters  Copying on different colored paper  Post-it notes  Buddy systems  Partner reading, study buddies  Word bank  Word walls  Posters/bulletin boards  Color overlays/masking  Reading windows or straight edges Low-tech interventions and accommodations

27 Consider alternatives to the way you present information..  High tech (Smartboard)  Low tech (Visual/auditory aids) And how you assess learning ?  Formal verses informal  Do you consider all learning styles? Alternate Considerations

28 Remember Gardner’s multiple intelligences?

29          Resources for Teachers

30  Online non-fiction news articles written at a variety of levels  offers over 90,000 digital books, textbooks. Formerly RFB&D  (fee) associated free app is called raz-kids. Resources to use with students

31  Decoding dyslexia video  Resources for Parents

32  Shop the Google play store or Apple store for products from:  Learning Ally (formerly Reading for the Blind and Dyslexic)  Assistiveware (representing new products for AAC) Apps

33 Dragon DictationDragon Dictation: Speech-to-text for a variety of mobile applications (think: messaging, ing, blog writing) ModMathModMath: Designed for individuals with dyslexia and dysgraphia for whom the mechanics of writing math problems causes a barrier. ModMath takes care of the construction of, for example, the long division problem. After that, solving that problem is up to you. VoiceDreamVoiceDream: Text-to-speech to aid in reading. This app also allows for screen, font and text size customization and highlighting. It has a built-in dictionary and works with text from lots of sources (PDF, ebooks, ). NotabilityNotability: Takes “handwritten” notes on documents to allow for adding sketches to PDF or graphics or editing student work (!!). Notability also has an audio recording feature for auditory learners, photo capability and it coordinates with sharing platforms like Google Drive and Dropbox. StoryVisualizerStoryVisualizer: Creates storybooks for students using their words and images. From Lego Education. UsTymeUsTyme: Allows two people to remotely read a story together by coupling FaceTime-like software with reading. DyslexiaQuestDyslexiaQuest: A series of games designed to “assess working memory, phonological awareness, processing speed, visual memory, auditory memory and sequencing skills.” Gamers are encouraged to keep practicing to master skills. Read2GoRead2Go (iOS) or Go Read (Android): Makes books accessible to people with print disabilities.Go Read Co:WriterCo:Writer: Word prediction software aids writing in real-time or later when editing. Text-to-speech feature reads letters, words, sentences, and documents. Produced by Don Johnston. Opt for the SOLO Suite and get Co:Writer; Read:Outloud; Write:Outloud and Draft:Builder. ….and some more

34  technology-education/apps-students-ld-dysgraphia- writing-difficulties technology-education/apps-students-ld-dysgraphia- writing-difficulties  technology-education/apps-students-ld-dyslexia- reading-difficulties technology-education/apps-students-ld-dyslexia- reading-difficulties Check out ncld.org for a complete listing of APPS for use with students

35 Despite Dyslexia: a review of famous people that have dyslexia Overcoming

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37 Contact Information   


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