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Walled Lake Consolidated Schools Superintendent Kenneth Gutman Welcome to Professional Development Day, March 6, 2012 Common Core State Standards Click.

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Presentation on theme: "Walled Lake Consolidated Schools Superintendent Kenneth Gutman Welcome to Professional Development Day, March 6, 2012 Common Core State Standards Click."— Presentation transcript:

1 Walled Lake Consolidated Schools Superintendent Kenneth Gutman Welcome to Professional Development Day, March 6, 2012 Common Core State Standards Click to Play

2 Walled Lake Consolidated Schools A Walk Through the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

3 http://youtu.be/9IGD9oLofks Why New Standards? 3

4 COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS & ELA - NOTABLE SHIFTS http://youtu.be/JDzTOyxRGLI 4

5 Rate your Common Core Knowledge 5 Scale: 0 -- This has something to do with fruit, right? 1 --Isn’t that those new English standards? I’ve heard something…didn’t Michigan adopt them? 2 --I’ve heard a bit about them and I’ve at least scanned through the standards document. 3 --I’ve read through the document and I can use the terms “strand” and “anchor standard” in the proper context. 4 --I know the document backwards and forwards; transitioning to these new standards will be a breeze! 01234

6 Rumor Control & “Burning Questions” 6  I heard 2 nd graders will have to read Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath. True? (No!)  Aren’t these “national standards” the first step toward a “national curriculum?” (No.)  Were teachers involved in creating these standards? (Yes—including members of NEA, AFT, NCTE and IRA)  Will new tests be created to assess students on the standards? (Yes – first assessment planned for Spring, 2014-15)

7 Where Can I Find the Entire Set of K-12 Standards? www.corestandards.org In the upper right hand corner of the page, click the “The Standards” tab. http://curriculum.wlcsd.org/http://curriculum.wlcsd.org/ – Language Arts - Content Expectations 7

8 A Treasure Hunt! (Handout) 8 At your table, use the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy to complete the Treasure Hunt handout.

9 READING Change in the balance of literature and informational texts A focus on appropriate levels of text complexity Clear and specific K-5 Foundational Skills WRITING Emphasis on argument/opinion and informative/ explanatory writing (NOTE: K-5 Opinion Writing leads to and supports 6-12 Argument Writing.) Writing about sources and supplying evidence for claims and ideas 9 So… What’s New???

10 Organization of the CCSS (Handout) 10

11 Changing DRA proficiency levels (Done!) Comparing old standards and units of study with CCSS Examining common assessments Reflect on/Improve K-12 instruction Examine district resources to determine how they might support CCSS instruction What is Happening/Will Happen in WLCS Related to the CCSS? 11

12 12 CCSS Packet The following slides provide an overview of the Common Core State Standards. Pay particular attention to bold and underlined portions of each standard. As you proceed through the PowerPoint, use sticky notes to mark each section of your CCSS packet for continued study and future reference.

13 Key Ideas and Details 1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. 2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. 3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text. CCR Standards for Reading appear on page 10 of the Standards document. Anchor Standards for Reading 13

14 Craft and Structure 4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. 5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole. 6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. CCR Standards for Reading appear on page 10 of the Standards document. Anchor Standards for Reading 14

15 Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words. 8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. 9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take. CCR Standards for Reading appear on page 10 of the Standards document. Anchor Standards for Reading 15

16 Anchor Standards for Reading Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity 10. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. CCR Standards for Reading appear on page 10 of the Standards document. 16

17 How does our current instruction support the 10 anchor standards for reading? At first glance, what “holes” or gaps exist in our instruction that need to be filled? 17

18 Standards are directed toward fostering students’ understanding and working knowledge of the English writing system. Categories include concepts of print, phonological awareness, phonics/word recognition, and fluency. Foundational skills are not an end in and of themselves, rather, they are important and necessary components of an effective, comprehensive reading program. The CCSS remind us to – “Teach students what they need to learn and not what they already know.” Foundational Skills for READING (K-5 only) CCR Standards for Foundational Skills begin on page 15 of the Standards document. 18

19 What do you notice about the Foundational Skills? 19

20 20 Overview of Anchor Standards for Writing Expect students to compose arguments (6-12) and opinions (K-5), informative/explanatory pieces, and narrative texts. Focus on the use of reason and evidence to substantiate an argument/opinion or claim. Emphasize ability to conduct research – short projects and sustained inquiry. Require students to incorporate technology as they create, refine, and collaborate on writing.

21 Writing and Research Draw evidence from texts Extensive practice with short, focused research projects (“typically taking a week and occurring—at a minimum— quarterly”) Increase focus on opinion and informative writing - less narrative writing. 21 CCR Standards for Writing appear on pages 18 of the Standards document.

22 Text Types and Purposes 1. Write arguments/opinions to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. 2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. 3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. CCR Standards for Writing appear on page 18 of the Standards document. Anchor Standards for Writing 22

23 Production and Distribution of Writing 4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. 5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. 6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others. CCR Standards for Writing appear on pages 18 of the Standards document. Anchor Standards for Writing 23

24 Research to Build and Present Knowledge 7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. 8. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism. 9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. CCR Standards for Writing appear on page 18 of the Standards document. Anchor Standards for Writing 24

25 Range of Writing 10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences. CCR Standards for Writing appear on page 18 of the Standards document. Anchor Standards for Writing 25

26 How does our current instruction support the 10 anchor standards for writing? At first glance, what “holes” or gaps exist in our instruction that need to be filled? 26

27 27 Overview of Speaking & Listening  Focus on speaking and listening in a range of settings  formal and informal  small-group and whole-class discussions  Emphasize effective communication practices  Require interpretation and analysis of message as presented through oral, visual, or multimodal formats Media and Technology are integrated throughout the standards.

28 Comprehension and Collaboration 1. Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. 2. Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. 3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric. CCR Standards for Speaking and Listening appear on page 22 of the Standards document. Anchor Standards for Speaking & Listening 28

29 Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas 4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. 5. Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations. 6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. CCR Standards for Speaking and Listening appear on page 22 of the Standards document. Anchor Standards for Speaking & Listening 29

30 How does our current instruction support the 6 anchor standards for speaking and listening? At first glance, what “holes” or gaps exist in our instruction that need to be filled? 30

31 31 Overview - Anchor Standards for Language Include conventions for standard English grammar and usage to be applied in both writing and speaking Highlight the importance of vocabulary acquisition through a mix of conversation, direct instruction, and reading to be addressed in the context of reading, writing, speaking and listening

32 Academic Vocabulary Appendix A: A 3 – Tiered Model Tier 1 Words everyday speech NOT the focus of instruction Tier 2 Words Far more likely to appear in written texts than in speech Often represent subtle or precise ways to communicate relatively simple ideas Found across many text types Not specific to any one discipline 1 Beck, McKeown, and Kucan; 2002, 2008. 32

33 A Focus on Academic Vocabulary Tier 3 Words Specific to a domain or a field of study Key to understanding a new concept within a text Often explicitly defined by an author Often heavily scaffolded in text (e.g., bold-faced, defined in glossary, etc.) Remember that Tier 2 and Tier 3 words deserve equal attention in instruction! 1 Beck, McKeown, and Kucan; 2002, 2008. 33

34 Conventions of Standard English 1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. 2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. CCR Standards for Language appear on page 25 of the Standards document. Anchor Standards for Language 34

35 Knowledge of Language 3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening. CCR Standards for Language appear on page 25 of the Standards document. Anchor Standards for Language 35

36 Vocabulary Acquisition and Usage 4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases by using context clues, analyzing meaningful word parts, and consulting general and specialized reference materials, as appropriate. 5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. CCR Standards for Language appear on page 25 of the Standards document. Anchor Standards for Language 36

37 Vocabulary Acquisition and Use 6. Acquire and use accurately a range of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when encountering an unknown term important to comprehension or expression. CCR Standards for Language appear on page 25 of the Standards document. Anchor Standards for Language 37

38 How does our current instruction support the 6 anchor standards for language? At first glance, what “holes” or gaps exist in our instruction that need to be filled? 38

39 Are These for ALL Students? (Handouts) 39 ELL Document: Application of Common Core State Standards for English Language Learners Special Services Document: Application to Students with Disabilities Follow these steps…

40 Are These for ALL Students? - STEP 1 40 Divide into two groups – 1s and 2s. 1s read ELL document 2s read Special Services document As you read, highlight any “Ahas” and things that leave you with questions. THEN…

41 Are These for ALL Students? - STEP 2 41 Create groups of 4 (two 1s and two 2s). 1s summarize what you read. Then… 2s summarize what you read. Write “Ahas” and questions on sticky notes and place on chart paper for later discussion.

42 42 Research supporting key elements of the CCSS Explanation of text complexity model Definitions of the three text types A three-tiered model of vocabulary development Glossary of key terms Appendix A

43 43 By grade/grade span, text to exemplify the level of text complexity, quality, and range required by the Standards. (The list offers examples but is not exhaustive.) Sample performance tasks that illustrate the application of the Standards to texts of sufficient complexity, quality, and range. Your copy contains exemplars for grades K-5. Grades 6-12 exemplars available on curriculum website. Appendix B

44 44 By grade, annotated student writing samples illustrating the criteria required to meet the Standards for particular types of writing—argument, informative/explanatory, and narrative. Your copy contains exemplars for grades K-5. Grades 6-12 exemplars available on curriculum website. Appendix C

45 45 About which section of the standards does your grade level have the most questions? In the time allotted, begin to work with your grade level colleagues to examine those grade level standards in depth. If time allows, continue to the next section. A Beginning Look at Your Grade Level Standards

46 46 http://youtu.be/BwND8J2SvGE Time for Lunch and… Karaoke !

47 Beginning to Understand Text Complexity 47

48 Text Complexity “The Common Core Standards hinge on students encountering appropriately complex texts at each grade level in order to develop the mature language skills and the conceptual knowledge they need for success in school and life.” (p. 3) 48

49 49 Overview Text complexity includes: Qualitative 2.Qualitative measures – best measured by an attentive human reader Quantitative 1.Quantitative measures – best measured by computer software (e.g., Flesch-Kincaid, Dale-Chall, Lexile) Reader and Task 3. Reader and Task considerations – best addressed by educators employing their professional judgment and knowledge of their students

50 Putting Yourself in the Role of the Reader 50 “The Garden of Forking Paths” by Jorge Luis Borges AS YOU READ 1.Using one color highlighter, highlight all of the parts you UNDERSTAND. 2.Using a second color highlighter, highlight parts you find challenging, confusing, or just plain difficult to understand. AFTER YOU READ 1.Next to parts you found challenging, confusing, or difficult to understand, note in the margins why the text was difficult. Lack of background knowledge? Unfamiliar vocabulary? Writing style? Something else?

51 Discuss at your tables… 51 1.What did you learn about yourselves as readers? 2.What made the text challenging? 3.What are the implications of what you learned for classroom instruction? Whole Group Debrief Any big “Ahas”?

52 A Four-Step Process: Determining Text Complexity 52 Reader and Task 4.Recommend placement in the appropriate text complexity band. 3.Reflect upon the reader and task considerations. 2.Analyze the qualitative measures of the text. 1.Determine the quantitative measures of the text.

53 Step 1: Quantitative Measures: the first of three “legs” of the text complexity triangle. 53 Word length Word frequency Word difficulty Sentence length Text length Text cohesion

54 Text Complexity Grade Bands Suggested Lexile Range End of Grade Span DRA Levels K-1100L – 500L*18-24 2-3450L – 790L38 4-5770L – 980L60 6-8955L – 1155L 9-101080L – 1305L 11-CCR1215L – 1355L Quantitative Measure Ranges for Text Complexity Grade Bands Common Core State Standards 54

55 55 Step 2: Qualitative Measures Levels of meaning Levels of purpose Structure Organization Language conventionality Language clarity Prior knowledge demands

56 Step 2: Qualitative Measures 56 Rubrics for Literary and Informational Text The rubrics help teachers evaluate the important qualitative measures. These measures are generally missed by computer tools that tend to focus on more easily measured quantitative features.

57 Step 2: Qualitative Measures 57 The two rubrics (literary and informational) contain different content. Neither uses numbers. Instead, points along each continuum are identified as low, middle low, middle high, and high.

58 58

59 59 Step 3: Reader and Task Motivation Knowledge and experience Purpose for reading Complexity of task assigned regarding text Complexity of questions asked regarding text

60 Step 3: Reader and Task Considerations (handout) 60 Questions for Professional Reflection on Reader and Task Considerations No single, correct answers. Designed to help you think through the implications of using a particular text in your classroom Can help you identify minilessons to support the use of a particular text.

61 Text Complexity and Your Read Alouds 61  In grade level groups, using the appropriate rubric, evaluate the qualitative measures of your table’s selected read aloud(s).  Complete the rubric.  Discuss what you notice.  Based on the reading exemplars for your grade level (Appendix B), is this book complex enough to use as a read aloud?  If YES, how could you adjust your questioning to add more complexity?  If NO, what type of text should you be using?

62 Word Study and the CCSS 62 1.Return to your standards document and examine your grade level standards again. 2.Highlight all references/connections to word study. 3.Review the WLCSD Word Study document. 4.Discuss: How does the information in the document support the CCSS? 5.Discuss: What changes to your word study instruction might you need to make? What change could you easily make immediately? What changes will require more time, reflection, and planning?

63 The Future… 63 1.Over the next couple of years, the K-5 Writing Units of Study and our benchmark assessment system will be revised to reflect the move to the CCSS. 2.Future materials adoptions for classroom/literacy libraries will respond to the demands of the CCSS. 3.ELA Study Committee representatives will help us align instruction and assessment to the CCSS.

64 What You Can Begin Doing Now (Handout) 64 We encourage you to use this document to help identify specific things you can begin doing tomorrow to align instructional practice with the CCSS for English Language Arts: In your classroom With grade level colleagues As a building

65 As always, your questions and comments are encouraged and valued!! Please send any/all via your ELA Study Committee representative(s) and/or contact: MaryKline@wlcsd.org 956-2079MaryKline@wlcsd.org MaryJaneSchau@wlcsd.org 956-2077MaryJaneSchau@wlcsd.org Working together, we can do anything! 65

66 66 We recommend that you use the remainder of this professional development day to reflect on your learning and make plans for studying and implementing the CCSS. Thank you for all you do for every child, every day!


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