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SCHOOL CURRICULUM PURDUE UNIVERSITY CALUMET DR. PAM FRAMPTON SUMMER 2014 VISION FOR AN EXCELLENT SCHOOL Kimberly Cummings.

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Presentation on theme: "SCHOOL CURRICULUM PURDUE UNIVERSITY CALUMET DR. PAM FRAMPTON SUMMER 2014 VISION FOR AN EXCELLENT SCHOOL Kimberly Cummings."— Presentation transcript:

1 SCHOOL CURRICULUM PURDUE UNIVERSITY CALUMET DR. PAM FRAMPTON SUMMER 2014 VISION FOR AN EXCELLENT SCHOOL Kimberly Cummings

2 “Education is the most powerful weapon we can use to change the world.” Nelson Mandela

3 TABLE OF CONTENTS Whiteland Elementary School Improvement Plan, p. 4-7 Ideal Elementary School Description of School and Community, p. 9 Vision and Mission Statements Core Value Statements, p. 10 Learning Environment, p st Century Proficiency Indicators for Success, p. 13 Demographics by Ethnicity, p. 14 Demographics by Free/Reduced Meals, p. 15 Demographics by English Language Learners, p. 16 Demographics by Special Education, p. 17 Safe and Nurturing Environment Summary, p. 18 Life Skills, p. 19 Anti-Bullying, p. 20 Counselor Bi-Monthly Lesson, p. 21 Crisis Response Team, p. 22 Organization Structure, p. 23 Highly Qualified Teachers, p. 24 Professional Development, p. 25 Opportunities for Teacher Input, p. 26 Academic Standards and Curriculum, p. 27 Technology, p. 28 Benchmark Assessments, p Instruction Strategies, p Community Involvement Opportunities, p. 35 Parent Teacher Student Organization (PTSO), p. 36 Student Clubs, p. 37 School Improvement Team, p. 38 Action Plan Goal #1, p DIBELS and Acuity Progress, p. 43 Action Plan Goal #2, p MClass and Acuity Progress, p. 47 Resources, p. 48 The End, p. 49

4 SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN WHITELAND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

5 I found it interesting to review Whiteland Elementary School’s “School Improvement Plan” because until this assignment occurred, I had never seen our school’s plan. I am not sure if this is common place with schools or not. I do know that the teachers and instructional assistants (IA’s) have discussed the items that are included in the plan, but I’m not sure that everyone is aware that all schools must have a documented improvement plan. WES’s plan is fairly thorough as you can see from the Table of Contents on the following slide. After researching other elementary school’s plans, I found some areas that I included in the “Ideal School’s Improvement Plan”. Some of these areas are: Team Members; Growth Goals, Parental Involvement, Cultural Competencies, and Technology as part of the Action Report; and 21 st Century Indicators for success. These are some of the items that I would change as a future principal. All school improvement plans that I found on-line were done using Word. My hope is that the state Department of Education allows for multiple ways of presenting documents. Power Point tends to be more interesting, to me, than mere words on paper. Although, I do realize the words are what communicates specifics to the reader. I used WES’s SIP and research to guide my “Vision of an Ideal School”. WES SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN OVERVIEW

6 Introduction Narrative Description of Community and School 3-5 Current Support Programming 6,7 Student Demographics 8-11 Mission Statement and Core Beliefs 12 Statutes to Be Waived 12 Description and Location of Curriculum 13 Titles and Descriptions of Assessment Instruments 13 Summary of Data 2013 ISTEP Acuity EOY mClass Conclusions about Current Programming Curriculum 23 Instructional Strategies 24 Analysis of Achievement 25 Parental Participation 26 Technology as a Learning Tool 26 Professional Development 27 Student Achievement Objectives Attendance Rate 28 Students Meeting Academic Standards 28 Specific Areas of School Improvement Goal #1 29,30 Goal #2 31 Appendix Clark-Pleasant Tiered System for Achievement 35 WHITELAND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TABLE OF CONTENTS

7 STRENGTHS Student data is displayed nicely in tables Assessments and descriptions are easy to read ISTEP+ reports, Acuity, and mClass reports are included Instructional strategy suggestions are included Safety section is thorough WEAKNESSES No Vision statement Yearly only instead of long-range Benchmarks missing from Action Plan Technology missing from Action Plan Parental involvement missing from Action Plan No Key members listed Core belief statements (only 3) do not mention diversity or culture WES SIP STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES

8 SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN 21 ST CENTURY IDEAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

9 The ideal school is a public elementary school consisting of grades k-5 with approximately 500 students. The teacher student ratio is 20:1 in grades 1-5 and 17:1 in kindergarten. The General Fund provides $7,500 per student each year. This includes $6,500 with an extra $1,000 to stay current with technology and to assist students with book funds and supplies. All teachers are highly qualified. The community is extremely supportive and involved in the daily operations and boast 97% attendance during our parent- teacher conferences. We host the latest technology to support 21 st century learning. IDEAL SCHOOL

10 Our school will provide a safe, caring, and supportive environment with high expectations for all children through varied developmentally appropriate instruction that allows for individual differences; and celebrates diversity in a positive atmosphere. MISSION All children will be confident, respectful, productive, contributing citizens who value diversity and are prepared for the 21 st century. VISION VISION AND MISSION STATEMENTS

11 We will provide a safe and creative learning environment. We believe all children can learn. We will provide a rigorous environment that prepares students for the future by incorporating 21st century learning skills. We will inspire students to be life-long learners who are productive citizens. We will offer individualized opportunities for success by implementing multiple instructional strategies. We will have assessments that are authentic and aligned to state standards. We will promote a positive and caring school culture that instills respect and values diversity. We will foster professional development and teacher collaboration to support high-quality instruction and student learning. We will cultivate relationships with the community by offering multiple opportunities for input. CORE VALUE STATEMENTS

12 a rigorous curriculum that meets the diverse needs of all students, and equips them to be responsible and productive members of society. a dedicated and caring staff with highly effective teachers. positive classrooms and staff. a safe and nurturing educational experience. modern technology for 21 st century learners. collaboration between all stakeholders to promote the success of every student. a culture of respect and appreciation for diversity among people. OUR LEARNING ENVIRONMENT PROVIDES:

13 Collaboration Communication Creativity and Innovation Cultural and Diversity Awareness Technology Critical Thinking Health and Wellness Responsibility Positive Relationships 21 ST CENTURY PROFICIENCY INDICATORS FOR SUCCESS

14 DEMOGRAPHICS BY ETHNICITY

15 DEMOGRAPHICS BY FREE/REDUCED PRICE MEALS

16 DEMOGRAPHICS BY ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS

17 DEMOGRAPHICS BY SPECIAL EDUCATION

18 In order to maintain a climate conducive to learning, we believe that students should feel safe and behave in a respectful, cooperative manner that causes no harm to any person or property. Our school guidelines for acceptable behavior are based on life skills and are specific. Appropriate disciplinary action is individualized based upon each circumstance. Alternatives include, but are not limited to the following: Parent phone call Written notification to parents to be signed and returned the next day Principal intervention Teacher/Parent/Student/Principal conference Counseling by our counselor Loss of privileges Out-of-school suspension In-school suspension Proper authorities notified Out-of-school Expulsion The above mentioned are in compliance with State Law I.C SAFE AND NURTURING ENVIRONMENT

19

20 ANTI-BULLYING: Bullying is defined for Indiana schools in HEA 1423 IC – “Bullying” means: Overt (intentional) unwanted, repeated acts or gestures including: Verbal or Written communication, or images transmitted in any manner (including digitally or electronically) Physical acts committed, aggression, or any other behaviors that are committed by a student or group of students against another student with the intent to Harass, ridicule, humiliate, intimidate, or harm the targeted student and create for the targeted student an objectively hostile school environment places the targeted student in reasonable fear or harm to the to the targeted student’s person or property ; o has a substantially detrimental effect on the targeted student’s physical or mental health ; o has the effect of substantially interfering with the targeted student’s academic performance ; OR has the effect of substantially interfering with the targeted student’s ability to participate in or benefit from the services, activities, and privileges provided by the school BULLYING WILL NOT BE TOLERATED. “ Our school identifies bullying as intentional, aggressive behavior that involves an imbalance of power or strength and is repeated over a period of time. If a student chooses to engage in any form of bullying, he or she will be subject to disciplinary action in relation to the seriousness of the offense. Bullying appears in many forms, including: physical, verbal, relational, emotional, and/or written/cyber. Examples include, but are not limited to: hitting, pushing, fighting, teasing, name-calling, intimidation, social exclusion, and writing or sending insulting or intimidating messages. If a student is bullied, or witnesses a bullying incident, he or she should report the incident(s) to a teacher, school counselor, or administrator so that the situation can be appropriately addressed” (CES SIP, 2014). SAFE AND NURTURING ENVIRONMENT

21 COUNSELOR BI-MONTHLY SAFETY LESSONS DRUG/ALCOHOL/TOBACCO PHYSICAL WELLNESS/ILLNESS PRECAUTIONS EQUIPMENT WEAPONSWEATHERFIRE BODYSWIMMINGSTRANGERS INTERNET CONFLICT/PERSONSONAL RELATIONSHIP BULLYING

22 CRISIS RESPONSE TEAM Our school maintains a Crisis Response Team manual which provides strategies to meet the needs of students, staff, and community during times of crisis. It is supplementary to the district’s Emergency Procedures manual. The primary purpose of “crisis response” is to help students and staff cope with painful emotions and feelings resulting from a community or school related crisis. The second purpose is to assist schools to return to normal routines as quickly and calmly as possible following a major disruption of the educational process. MAJOR GOALS To facilitate the safety of the students and staff Avoid confusion Help the school community survive a traumatic situation Help the system get back to normal as soon as possible Reduce psychological suffering Maintain follow-up Avoid potential liability Help maintain a supportive, positive learning environment SAFE AND NURTURING ENVIRONMENT

23 ORGANIZATION STRUCTURE STUDENTS 500 PRINCIPAL 1 ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL 1 SECRETARY/ TREASURER 2 CLASSROOM TEACHERS 30 RELATED ARTS TEACHERS 3 INSTRUCTIONAL COACH 1 INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTANTS 14 CUSTODIANS 3 COUNSELOR 1 BUS DRIVERS 13 CAFETERIA STAFF 6 COMMUNITY 40,000 NURSE 1 MEDIA SPECIALISTS 2 SPEECH & LANGUAGE 1 SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHERS 2

24 All teachers are Highly Qualified as shown below: HIGHLY QUALIFIED TEACHERS TEACHER’S NAME TEACHER’S ASSIGNMENT HOUSSEPRAXIS TEACHER’S NAME TEACHER’S ASSIGNMENT HOUSSEPRAXIS TEACHER’S NAME TEACHER’S ASSIGNMENT HOUSSEPRAXIS TeacherKindergartenXTeacherGrade 2XTeacherGrade 4X TeacherKindergartenXTeacherGrade 2XTeacherGrade 5X TeacherKindergartenXTeacherGrade 2XTeacherGrade 5X TeacherKindergartenXTeacherGrade 2XTeacherGrade 5X TeacherKindergartenXTeacherGrade 3XTeacherGrade 5X TeacherGrade 1XTeacherGrade 3XTeacher Special Education X TeacherGrade 1XTeacherGrade 3XTeacher Special Education X TeacherGrade 1XTeacherGrade 3XTeacherArtX TeacherGrade 1XTeacherGrade 4XTeacherMusicX TeacherGrade 1XTeacherGrade 4XTeacherGymX

25 Our district has offered instructional trainings in the following areas: Daily 5 Café with Kristina Smekens 6+1 Writing trainings Dr. Rasinski. Benchmark Literacy Training, Reading Classroom Management training Differentiated Instruction training Webinars PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

26 Staff Meetings PTSO Grade Level Chairs School Improvement Team E/LA Committee Math Committee Science/Social Studies Committee Textbook Adoption Discussion Team Professional Learning Communities Technology Committee OPPORTUNITIES FOR TEACHER INPUT

27 The corporation and school’s curriculum is based upon Indiana’s Academic Standards; which are provided by the Indiana Department of Education. Each teacher is provided with the academic standards and the district’s curriculum maps and scope and sequence charts. All assessments are authentic and aligned with Indiana’s State Standards. “Academic standards focus on what students will need to learn in order to be college and career ready and to be competitive in the job market” (IDOE, 2014). ACADEMIC STANDARDS AND CURRICULUM

28 21 st CENTURY TECHNOLOGY First in Math Mobi’s Student Clickers SMART Boards Teacher Web Sites Three Computer Labs Four Student Laptops per Classroom TECHNOLOGY 21 st CENTURY TECHNOLOGY Read Naturally (RTI) Lexia (RTI) Headsprout (RTI) Kidspiration Hardcourt Phonics Express Teacher/Student/ Parent Online Gradebook Document Cameras

29 ACUITY: Grades 3 and 4 take the Acuity Predictive assessments three times a year. This assessment is an indicator of how students will perform on the state’s ISTEP+ test given in March and April. Teachers use the data from Acuity to modify instruction as needed. InView: An achievement test of cognitive skills given to 5 th grade students to help the middle school cluster students for High Ability classes. IREAD: A state mandated test given to students in grade 3 to assess proficient reading skills. ISTEP+: An annual criterion-referenced test mandated for students in grades 3 through 10. Students in grades 3 through 5 take English/Language Arts and math. Students in grades 4 also take science, and students in grades 5 take social studies. LAS Links: A language level placement assessment given to English Language Learners (ELL) students. mCLASS & DIBELS Next: from the Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills is administered to students in grades k-2. (Continued) BENCHMARK ASSESSMENTS

30 mClass & DIBELS Next provides benchmarks at the beginning of the year, middle of the year, and end of the year. Reading 3-D assesses NWF (nonsense word fluency), LNF (letter naming fluency), FSF (first sound fluency), DORF 15 (DIBELS Oral Reading Fluency), and PSF (phoneme segmentation fluency). TRC (text reading and comprehension) assesses the following student reading skills in the context of authentic text: reading connected text accurately, fluently and with comprehension. DIBELS and mCLASS math is assessed at the same grade levels. Counting, number identification, next number, missing number, quantity discrimination, number facts, computation, and concepts and the focused skills addressed by this assessment. SRI: Scholastic Reading Inventory computer Lexile Reading assessments for students in grades 3 and 4. Tests are given once every 30 or more days. BENCHMARK ASSESSMENTS (CONTINUED)

31 Below-Level Task Problem solving skills are reinforced with multiple strategies and/or help to meet grade level proficiencies. RTI may be needed. On-Level Task Problem solving tasks are on grade level. Assessments meet grade level proficiencies and are aligned with state standards. Above-Level Task Problem solving tasks are advanced, more in-depth, and extended to explore grade level proficiencies. INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES Differentiation based on complexity not quantity.

32 SCAFFOLDING: Breaking up the learning into chunks and then providing a tool, or structure, with each part. Providing learning experiences that serve as bridges that bring children from where they are to where they need to be FLEXIBLE GROUPING: using data to determine readiness and interest groupings for small-group instruction within the classroom INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTANTS: IAs support classroom instruction. SPIRALING CURRICULUM: Continual revisiting of past standards in a spiraling manner in order to ensure student mastery. INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES (CONT.)

33 Differentiation based on student learning styles. The eight multiple intelligences include: INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES (CONT.)

34 Source:

35 PTSODonuts with DadTutoring Santa Sneak Shop Popcorn Fridays Grandparent/ Special Person/ Kindergarten Tea Scholastic Book Fair Skating PartiesFall Harvest Party Santa Sneak Shop Winter Holiday Luncheon Valentine PartySpring Carnival Chili Supper Competition Staff Appreciation Week COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT OPPORTUNITIES

36 Parent and community involvement is an integral part of both educating the whole child and inviting members of the community to invest in the education of their future leaders. An active PTSO also facilitates family participation in school-wide events, such as fine arts programs, book fair nights, Back-to-School night, and the annual Science Fair. We are exploring opportunities that will foster increased parent and community involvement. Parents of Whiteland Elementary School students are our partners in educating students. They have online access to teacher and school newsletters, which are also sent to parents’ inboxes. They also have online access to their children’s grades. PARENT TEACHER STUDENT ORGANIZATION Source: WES SIP

37 CHESS SPORTS CLUB FUTURE PROBLEM SOLVERS BOOK CLUB HOBBY CLUB EARTH & RECYCLING CLUB STUDENT CLUBS

38 The School Improvement Team/Highly Reliable Schools Guiding Coalition leads the development of a school improvement plan that focuses on student achievement needs, monitors the implementation of the plan, and to revises it when necessary. The team will collaborate to evaluate and amend the school improvement plan as needed. SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT TEAM NAMEPOSITION TBDPrincipal TBDAssistant Principal TBD Kindergarten Teacher TBD1 st Grade Teacher TBD2 nd Grade Teacher TBD3 rd Grade Teacher TBD4 th Grade Teacher TBD5 th Grade Teacher TBDRelated Arts Teacher TBDCounselor

39 SCHOOL: Ideal Elementary SchoolFOCUS AREA: Reading Comprehension GOAL: By spring 20**, at least 100% of all 3 rd and 4 th grade students will meet Indiana Academic Standards in ELA as measured by ISTEP+. By spring 20**, the median student growth percentile will be at least 80% on ISTEP+ BENCHMARKS: Year 1: By spring 20**, 80% of grades K-2 students will be in green as measured by DIBELS. Year 2: By spring 20**, 90% of grades K-2 students will be in green as measured by DIBELS Year 3: By spring 20**, 100% of grades K-2 students will be in green as measured by DIBELS. Year 1: By spring 20**, 80% of grades 3-4 students will be in Tiers 3 or 4 as measured by Acuity. Year 2: By spring 20**, 90% of grades 3-4 students will be in Tiers 3 or 4 as measured by Acuity. Year 3: By spring 20**, 100% of grades 3-4 students will be in Tiers 3 or 4 as measured by Acuity. STRATEGIESSUPPORTING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND ASSESMENT BEGIN DATE ACTION STEPS PERSON RESPONSIBLE BEGIN DATE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PERSON RESPONSIBLE EVIDENCE OF IMPLEMENTATION EVIDENCE OF IMPACT 8/1/** General Achievers: Teachers provide differentiated instruction that is rigorous and aligned with state standards through: Flexible grouping Student conferencing Grade level comprehension assessments Teachers & I.A.’s 8/1/** Daily 5 CAFÉ professional development 6+1 Writing professional development PLC data team meetings Principals Instructional Coach Teachers I.A.’s Classroom Observations Progress Monitoring PLC Meetings Data Reports DIBELS or Acuity Common Assessments Lexile Reports ACTION PLAN GOAL #1

40 STRATEGIESSUPPORTING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND ASSESMENT BEGIN DATE ACTION STEPS PERSON RESPONSIBLE BEGIN DATE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PERSON RESPONSIBLE EVIDENCE OF IMPLEMENTATION EVIDENCE OF IMPACT 8/1/** Low Achievers: Teachers provide “General Achievers” steps in addition to the following: Comprehension strategies Small group instruction Tiered instruction Teachers & I.A.’s 8/1/** Specific CAFÉ (comprehension, accuracy, fluency, and expanded vocabulary) professional development DIBELS professional development PLC data team meetings Principals Instructional Coach Teachers I.A.’s RTI Team Classroom Observations Progress Monitoring PLC Meetings Data Reports DIBELS or Acuity Common Assessments Lexile Reports 8/1/** High Achievers: Teachers provide “General Achievers” steps in addition to the following: Accelerated Instruction In-depth Instruction Teachers8/1/** High Ability professional development PLC data team meetings Principals Instructional Coach Teachers H. A. Team Classroom Observations Progress Monitoring PLC Meetings Data Reports DIBELS or Acuity Common Assessments Lexile Reports ACTION PLAN (CONTINUED)

41 STRATEGIESSUPPORTING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND ASSESMENT BEGIN DATE ACTION STEPS PERSON RESPONSIBLE BEGIN DATE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PERSON RESPONSIBLE EVIDENCE OF IMPLEMENTATION EVIDENCE OF IMPACT 10/1/** Parental Involvement: Parents assist with reading comprehension and attend trainings offered by teachers and the Instructional Coach Teachers Instructional Coach & Parents 10/1/** Parent/Teacher conferences Trainings for parents and community Principals Instructional Coach Teachers & Parents Volunteer Log DIBELS or Acuity Common Assessments Lexile Reports 10/1/** Cultural Competency: Reading material includes various genres, cultures, and ethnicities in at least one content area. Teachers Parents & Students 10/1/** Communication and collaboration of selected literature Diversity professional development Principals Instructional Coach Teachers Classroom Observations Collaboration DIBELS or Acuity Common Assessments Lexile Reports 10/1/** Technology: Teachers will use Smart Boards, Mobi’s, Document Cameras, and On-line resources to enhance reading instruction Teachers10/1/** Technology workshops Principals Instructional Coach Teachers Classroom Observations DIBELS or Acuity Common Assessments Lexile Reports ACTION PLAN (CONTINUED)

42 Review and analyze ISTEP+ results Review and analyze DIBELS data Review and analyze Acuity data Review and analyze Lexile data Report Cards REVIEW ACTION STEPS: Flexible grouping Student conferencing Grade level comprehension assessments CAFÉ strategies RTI interventions QUARTERLY CHECKPOINT #1 October 31 Review and analyze DIBELS data Review and analyze Acuity data Review and analyze Lexile data Report Cards REVIEW ACTION STEPS: Flexible grouping Student conferencing Grade level comprehension assessments CAFÉ strategies RTI interventions QUARTERLY CHECKPOINT #2 December 31 Review and analyze DIBELS data Review and analyze Acuity data Review and analyze Lexile data Report Cards REVIEW ACTION STEPS: Flexible grouping Student conferencing Grade level comprehension assessments CAFÉ strategies RTI interventions QUARTERLY CHECKPOINT #3 March 31 Review and analyze DIBELS data Review and analyze Acuity data Review and analyze Lexile data Report Cards REVIEW ACTION STEPS: Flexible grouping Student conferencing Grade level comprehension assessments CAFÉ strategies RTI interventions QUARTERLY CHECKPOINT #4 May 31 ACTION PLAN (CONTINUED)

43 DIBELS AND ACUITY PROGRESS

44 SCHOOL: Ideal Elementary SchoolFOCUS AREA: Math Problem Solving GOAL: By spring 20**, at least 100% of all 3 rd and 4 th grade students will meet Indiana Academic Standards in Math as measured by ISTEP+. By spring 20**, the median student growth percentile will be at least 80% on ISTEP+ BENCHMARKS: Year 1: By spring 20**, 80% of grades K-2 students will be in green as measured by math mClass. Year 2: By spring 20**, 90% of grades K-2 students will be in green as measured by math mClass. Year 3: By spring 20**, 100% of grades K-2 students will be in green as measured by math mClass.. Year 1: By spring 20**, 80% of grades 3-4 students will be in Tiers 3 or 4 as measured by Acuity. Year 2: By spring 20**, 90% of grades 3-4 students will be in Tiers 3 or 4 as measured by Acuity. Year 3: By spring 20**, 100% of grades 3-4 students will be in Tiers 3 or 4 as measured by Acuity. STRATEGIESSUPPORTING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND ASSESMENT BEGIN DATE ACTION STEPS PERSON RESPONSIBLE BEGIN DATE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PERSON RESPONSIBLE EVIDENCE OF IMPLEMENTATION EVIDENCE OF IMPACT 8/1/** General Achievers: Teachers provide explicit instruction with multiple step problem solving and mathematical concepts Instruction will continually spiral throughout the year. Teachers & I.A.’s 8/1/** Mathematical Strategies including Manipulatives Horizontal and Vertical Collaboration between Grade Level Teams Principals Instructional Coach Teachers I.A.’s Classroom Observations Progress Monitoring PLC Meetings Data Reports Math mClass Acuity Common Assessments ACTION PLAN GOAL #2

45 STRATEGIESSUPPORTING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND ASSESMENT BEGIN DATE ACTION STEPS PERSON RESPONSIBLE BEGIN DATE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PERSON RESPONSIBLE EVIDENCE OF IMPLEMENTATION EVIDENCE OF IMPACT 8/1/** Low Achievers: Teachers provide interventions with multiple step problem solving and mathematical concepts. Teachers & I.A.’s 8/1/** Mathematical strategies including manipulatives Horizontal and vertical collaboration between grade level teams Principals Instructional Coach Teachers I.A.’s Classroom Observations Progress Monitoring PLC Meetings Data Reports Math mClass Acuity Common Assessments 8/1/** High Achievers: Teachers provide learning opportunities for higher-level applications. Instruction is accelerated and more in-depth. Teachers & I.A.’s 8/1/** High Ability professional development Principals Instructional Coach Teachers I.A.’s Classroom Observations Progress Monitoring PLC Meetings Data Reports Math mClass Acuity Common Assessments 8/1/** Parental Involvement: Parents will assist in the classroom with reinforcing mathematical lessons Teachers & Parents 8/1/** Teachers and parents will collaborate together Principals Teachers & Parents Volunteer Log Math mClass Acuity Common Assessments 8/1/** Technology: Teachers will use Smart Boards, Mobi’s, Document Cameras, and On-line resources to enhance reading instruction Teachers8/1/** Math and technology workshops Teachers Classroom Observations Math mClass Acuity Common Assessments ACTION PLAN GOAL #2

46 Review and analyze ISTEP+ results Review and analyze Math mClass data Review and analyze Acuity data Report Cards REVIEW ACTION STEPS: Flexible grouping Use of manipulatives Visual aids RTI interventions Enrichment as needed QUARTERLY CHECKPOINT #1 October 31 Review and analyze Math mClass data Review and analyze Acuity data Report Cards REVIEW ACTION STEPS: Flexible grouping Use of manipulatives Visual aids RTI interventions Enrichment as needed QUARTERLY CHECKPOINT #2 December 31 Review and analyze Math mClass data Review and analyze Acuity data Report Cards REVIEW ACTION STEPS: Flexible grouping Use of manipulatives Visual aids RTI interventions Enrichment as needed QUARTERLY CHECKPOINT #3 March 31 Review and analyze Math mClass data Review and analyze Acuity data Report Cards REVIEW ACTION STEPS: Flexible grouping Use of manipulatives Visual aids RTI interventions Enrichment as needed QUARTERLY CHECKPOINT #4 May 31 ACTION PLAN (CONTINUED)

47 MCLASS AND ACUITY PROGRESS

48 CLARK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL’S “SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN” WHITELAND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL’S “SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN” RESOURCES

49 THE END Magic School Bus


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