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Sustainable Development - Definitions ARBE121 – SUSTAINABILITY “… development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future.

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Presentation on theme: "Sustainable Development - Definitions ARBE121 – SUSTAINABILITY “… development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future."— Presentation transcript:

1 Sustainable Development - Definitions ARBE121 – SUSTAINABILITY “… development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” Bruntland Commission, United Nations, 1987 “…the creation and management of healthy buildings based upon resource efficient and ecological principles.” BSRIA “… creating buildings which are energy-efficient, healthy, comfortable, flexible in use and designed for long life.” Norman Foster & Partners

2 Sustainable Development – UK Government View ARBE121 – SUSTAINABILITY  Sustainable development encompasses Inclusive social progress Effective protection of the environment Prudent use of natural resources Maintenance of levels of employment & economic growth  Performance against objectives assessed 15 “headline” indicators – GDP, Percentage of “unfit” housing etc… 150+ “core” indicators – amount of construction waste going to landfill etc…

3 Sustainable Development – the implications ARBE121 – SUSTAINABILITY  A broad “duty of care” Not just to “client” but to community, world & the future!  Construction/development process has impacts on Global and national infrastructure Design of cities and communities Individual buildings Building components and materials  Full implementation of principles is difficult Cannot be achieved by construction action alone, may require “lifestyle” changes

4 Sustainable Development – the implications ARBE121 – SUSTAINABILITY  Enforcement/application in construction may come via Legislation and control Professional bodies’ codes of practice Education Public pressure  Rational assessment of building’s sustainability involves Social impacts Environmental/ecological impacts Economic effects Consideration of whole life cycle - building, systems, materials

5 Considerations in design & construction ARBE121 – SUSTAINABILITY  Energy issues Measuring impact - CO 2 emissions or running costs Lowering energy usage – passive heating, natural lighting, high insulation etc and monitoring performance Consider “embodied energy” – extraction, processing, manufacture, transport etc… of materials & components Use renewable energy where possible – sunlight for photovoltaic generation, micro wind turbines etc… Strategies need early consideration in design – especially passive elements relying on location, orientation, internal layout

6 Considerations in design & construction ARBE121 – SUSTAINABILITY  Water usage Reduce use of “clean” (processed) water – sensor driven flushing, self-closing taps, low use appliances etc and monitor use Increase “grey” water use – collect rainwater and re-cycle waste water and use for flushing etc Contribution to flood prevention – pervious “hard” landscaping, use of “soft” landscaping etc…  Land use Control encroachment into “green belt” & agricultural - treatment and re-use of contaminated and “brownfield” sites

7 Considerations in design & construction ARBE121 – SUSTAINABILITY  Material resources – the 4 R’s In decreasing order of preference Reduce – conserving scarce resources (e.g. use hardwoods only from renewable sources), eco-labelling schemes, waste prevention, local sourcing of materials Re-use – refurbish buildings, preserve facades, material salvage etc – without processing Recycle – process salvaged materials into new components e.g. copper and steel, some plastics Recover – reclaim what you can before before disposal e.g. recover embodied energy by incineration for power

8 Considerations in design & construction ARBE121 – SUSTAINABILITY  Increasing building life Design for long life – material robustness, ease of repair, maintenance, replacement, refurbishment etc… Design for change – “loose fit” flexibility of use for changing business operations, technologies etc… Accommodating climate change  Environmental/ecological factors Environmental impact assessment – pollution of air & water, noise from construction/operation, loss of habitat/amenity Remedial measures – landscaping, planting, recreation of habitats etc…

9 Considerations in design & construction ARBE121 – SUSTAINABILITY  Healthy buildings Occupant comfort – environmental performance (temperature, humidity, lighting) Freedom from pollutants – air quality (materials & services systems as sources), radon gas etc… Responsive and stimulating environments – good control systems, contact with external environment (light, landscaping), use of natural materials etc…

10 Challenges in attaining sustainability ARBE121 – SUSTAINABILITY  Complexity Entails many, interrelated factors, sometimes in conflict – e.g. manufacture of insulation materials causes pollution! Requires multi-disciplinary approach Requires lifestyle & attitudinal changes in general public  Difficulty in assessment Combining qualitative & quantitative variables & weighing social impacts against environmental etc… Combining quantities with different units Has to look many years into future – high uncertainty!

11 Assessing sustainability ARBE121 – SUSTAINABILITY  Early models Concentrated on energy issues – BREDEM for housing, BREEAM for offices  Expanded models BREEAM – now includes CO 2 emissions, healthy building features, ozone depletion, noise etc, etc… Points scores assigned on weighted performance on factors  The ideal aim – a whole life, “cost/benefit” model Three phases of life – production, use & disposal Balances social, economic and environmental factors Reduces all costs/benefits to present value

12 Further reading ARBE121 – SUSTAINABILITY A good, straightforward guide to topic is: Edwards & Hyett, Rough Guide to Sustainability, RIBA, The UK government Sustainable Development website has a lot of useful information – and more specifically, the 1998 report on construction at: The Movement for Innovation (m4i) – a development following the 1998 Egan Report - has a website at that covers many related issues including report on performance indicators in its “publications” section and many case studies of real project implementations in its “innovations” section.http://www.m4i.org.uk


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