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Modernism in Fitzgerald's Works An analysis and comparison of Modernist themes of several short stories Evan Widloski.

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Presentation on theme: "Modernism in Fitzgerald's Works An analysis and comparison of Modernist themes of several short stories Evan Widloski."— Presentation transcript:

1 Modernism in Fitzgerald's Works An analysis and comparison of Modernist themes of several short stories Evan Widloski

2 Modernism Cultural revolution from 1910-1945 Rejection of old ways Disillusionment with city life Rejection of extravagance and ornamentation Modernist architecture with clean, rectangular lines

3 Common themes Rejection of old ideas – realism, romanticism Desire for material things Protagonist whose dreams are shattered Over-indulging culture Blindness from wealth Past is inescapable

4 Winter Dreams Follows the life of an ambitious young man Changes life directions whimsically – Winter Dreams Dexter meets a strong-headed girl, Judy, but she is uninterested in him  She only cares for wealth They meet years later and Dexter brags of business success Judy flirts with other men, and ends up marrying elsewhere Dexter mourns over the years he lost chasing her

5 Winter Dreams v. The Great Gatsby Judy and Daisy play the same role in both stories  They represent the allure of extravagance and the emptiness from it Gatsby parallels Dexter Green  Both were ambitious young boys with targets set on success  Focused solely on gain. Material earnings are everything.  Gatsby and Dexter's dreams are destroyed by their overwhelming attraction to prosperity

6 Babylon Revisted Charlie is a likeable young man with a sinful past He seems repenting but his attitude is sly and extremely persuasive Charlie comes to Paris for the purpose of reclaiming his daughter, Honoria He is hopeful that he will get to spend time with her  There is a change of plans: Charlie will not get Honoria, and the story abruptly ends

7 Babylon Revisited v. The Great Gatsby Both Charlie and Gatsby led consuming lives  Changed their image and were presented as likeable characters  Despite being virtuous their history caught up with them and they pay dearly for it Their dreams vanish immediately  Gatsby is killed without a fight and uneventfully  Charlie ends the story quickly, unable to bear the pain of losing his daughter

8 The Lost Decade Orrison Brown is asked to take Trimble out to lunch Brown begins to notice oddities in Trimble's answers  He wants to see the backs of people's necks and he is fascinated by the weight of spoons Trimble finally reveals that he spent the last decade drinking heavily and that he is trying to reclaim it Trimble's odd behavior shows the absolute loss resulting from his alcohol problems and encourages the reader to appreciate the detail of everyday life

9 The Lost Decade v. The Great Gatsby Fitzgerald is able to convey so much in this short story Trimble and Gatsby experience a disconnect  They are both “dreamers”  Trimble lost a decade to drinking while Gatsby lost 5 years obsessing over Daisy Orrison Brown and Nick serve as observers  They both make mental remarks, but never directly ask what they are thinking Drunk by Egon Schiele

10 Fitzgerald

11 Works Cited Images: http://fitzgeraldmusings.blogspot.com/2011/04/he-knew-she- was-lying.html http://fitzgeraldmusings.blogspot.com/2011/04/he-knew-she- was-lying.html http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/59/2006-06- 05_1580x2900_chicago_modernism.jpg http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/59/2006-06- 05_1580x2900_chicago_modernism.jpg http://images.fineartamerica.com/images-medium/drunk- inspired-by-egon-schiele-udi-peled.jpg Sources http://gutenberg.net.au/fsf/WINTER-DREAMS.html http://gutenberg.net.au/fsf/BABYLON-REVISITED.html http://www.gutenberg.net.au/fsf/THE-LOST-DECADE.html


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