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Lake Management Group Presentation to the Shareholders.

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Presentation on theme: "Lake Management Group Presentation to the Shareholders."— Presentation transcript:

1 Lake Management Group Presentation to the Shareholders

2 Why the Formation of the Lake Management Group (LMG)?   The future of many of Massachusetts’ lakes is at stake. Aquatic nuisance species, pollution, shoreline and watershed development and storm water issues threaten the health of our lakes.   Hickory Hills remains one of the healthiest lakes in the Commonwealth, due in large part to our continued commitment to lake management.   It is critical that citizens become involved and take an active role in improving the health of their lakes and protecting this valuable resource.

3 The Need for Lake Management  Biological surveys of the lake have been conducted periodically since  Water quality testing is conducted weekly during the summer months.  A harvester is used for aquatic vegetation management on the main lake  Chemical treatments have been applied to Little Hickory  Dedicated volunteers manage/remove loosestrife and other nuisance vegetation The Board of Directors have taken a proactive approach to responsible lake management, and along with many dedicated volunteers have long been successfully managing the lake environment. The Board of Directors have taken a proactive approach to responsible lake management, and along with many dedicated volunteers have long been successfully managing the lake environment.

4 Every Lake has a Lifecycle  As a lake matures, leaves, weeds, and other organic matter decay and settle to the bottom, creating a fertile environment for more plants to take root and grow, die and decay…  Over time, the bed of the lake rises enough to support marsh species, creating wetlands  Wetlands fill in to become grasslands and meadows  Grasslands become forests

5 Some factors can speed up the “Aging” Process  Storm waters wash fertilizers, silt and debris into the lake  Upstream human and animal activity can erode the watershed and bring even more silt and debris into the lake  Equipment and boats that have been in other waters can carry invasive weeds, mussels and algae

6  In January of 2009, recognizing that a focused, comprehensive effort would serve the lake well, the Board approved formation of a Lake Management Group.  The group was chartered to evaluate all aspects of our lake environment and to identify issues that may now or in future affect the natural health of the lake. This group consists of dedicated lake residents from various areas of Hickory Hills.

7 HHL LMG’s Mandate  Evaluate the quality of the lake ecosystem and identify potential issues  Research options to address issues  Recommend best courses of action to the Board  Provide timely, in-depth information

8 Issues Identified to Date  Silting/ Sedimentation  Aquatic Vegetation  Storm Water  Erosion

9 Specific areas of note

10 Silting/sedimentation Island Road/Mulpus Inlet Cove

11 Inlet Flow Monitoring Recent buildup of sediment and debris

12 Aquatic Vegetation Management

13 Main Lake Survey B-Watershield Pa-Largeleaf pondweed Pe-Ribbon-leaf pondweed Pn-Floating-leaf pondweed Pr-Robbins pondweed P-Mermaid Weed Ny-White Waterlily U-Bladderwort V-tapegrass S-Submersed Arrowhead

14 B-Watershield Pa-Largeleaf pondweed (Gray area – 40-60% Cover) Pe-Ribbon-leaf pondweed T-Cattails P-Common Reed Little Hickory Survey

15 Bladderwort Recently an increase in the amount of Bladderwort has been noted.

16   Bladderwort is not new to the lake; has been noted in previous survey reports and identified as a dominant species   Over 200 species of bladderwort, 13 in Massachusetts – species currently in lake are native   varies in abundance from year to year based on numerous environmental factors such as water clarity, water temperature, water level and other climatic patterns and conditions

17   Density this year not necessarily indicative of density next year   Bladderwort propagates from year to year primarily by dropping Winter Buds. It can also spread by tubers or fragments and by seed, although these are not the primary means of reproduction.   LMG and Board of Directors will continue to monitor. Mitigation measures will be explored and implemented as necessary.

18 Storm Water  Subcommittee is investigating potential storm water issues  41 storm water structures in Hickory Hills, 23 identified as potential issues

19 Storm Water Structures HH Area

20 Erosion & Sedimentation

21 Existing Management Techniques to be Continued  Planned Management Water Quality Testing Water Quality Testing Vegetation Survey every 2 years Vegetation Survey every 2 years  Harvesting  Aquatic Management Main Lake & Little Hickory

22 Management Techniques for Further Exploration  Hydro raking  Erosion Control Measures  Benthic Barriers  Storm water Management

23 Hydro Raking  Mechanical raking (Hydro-Raking) is a widely used and effective technique for area selective removal of nuisance, rooted vegetation.  In some situations the Hydro-Rake is also used to clear accumulations of unconsolidated bottom debris (i.e. decaying leaves, peat, muck).  The Hydro-Rake can best be described as a floating barge upon which is mounted a backhoe with several different size and functioning rake attachments.

24  If approved by the Board of Directors, the Hydro Rake would be utilized at various locations on the main lake and perhaps at Little Hickory. The possibility of allowing individual homeowners to contract with the vendor for individual beach clean up is being explored.

25 Hydro Raking Advantages  Operating range in water depths of <1 feet to 12 feet  Removes plants and roots systems  One Hydro-Raking typically provides seasonal to 1-3 years or longer of nuisance plant control  Clearing of selective areas including beaches, boating/fishing lanes, etc.  No chemical introduction or water use restrictions  Minimal disturbance to shoreline landscapes

26 Erosion Control Techniques  Rip Rap & Stones  Silt Sacks  Vegetative Cover

27 Silt Sack Section View

28 Benthic Barriers   Benthic barriers, also known as benthic mats or bottom screens, are mats that are installed on the bottom of a lake to inhibit the growth of invasive aquatic plants.  The benthic screen limits light to the bottom of the lake, thus helping to preclude the growth of aquatic vegetation.  Barriers consist of dark, light blocking fabric that is held at the bottom of the lake by weights. The benthic screen limits light to the bottom of the lake, thus helping to preclude the growth of aquatic vegetation.

29

30 Before Pictures Lake Holland Belchertown, MA Taken October 8, 2007

31 After Pictures

32 Storm Water “One of the greatest threats to the quality of water in our lakes and ponds and the health of the aquatic environment is storm water pollution.” “Storm water can carry a variety of contaminants that may degrade the receiving waterbody including: nutrients, sediments, bacteria, metals, toxic substances, trash, and warmer water with low dissolved oxygen.” Massachusetts Lake and Pond Guide

33 Over the next several months, the Storm Water Sub-Committee will: Investigate storm water issues and structures in the Hickory Hills area Investigate storm water issues and structures in the Hickory Hills area Identify possible problems Identify possible problems Research possible mitigation techniques Research possible mitigation techniques Make recommendations to the LMG & the Board of Directors Make recommendations to the LMG & the Board of Directors

34 Hickory Hills is one of the few remaining water bodies in Massachusetts that does not have invasive species. Through diligence, preventive management and education we can keep it that way!

35 LMG Budget Proposal  The LMG has suggested a budget of an average of $12,000/yr over the next five years.  These funds, contingent upon the approval of the Board of Directors, will be utilized for numerous lake management activities.

36 Valuable Information/Lessons from other Lakes in the Commonwealth

37 Morses Pond, Wellesley A shallow man made lake that covers approximately 105 acres, mostly in the Town of Wellesley with a small portion in the Town of Natick. Since at least the early 1970s the pond has exhibited symptoms of over fertilization including recurrent algal blooms, reduced transparency, and dense aquatic vegetation growths that have impaired recreational water uses and important aesthetic and wildlife habitat functions. The 2005 Comprehensive Management Plan for Morses Pond recommended a budget of $2.3 million to be expended over a five year period.

38 Fawn Lake, Bedford, MA Fawn Lake is a 12-acre, man-made recreational lake experiencing deteriorating water quality and decreased recreation use caused by nuisance aquatic vegetation. The management technique chosen was a combination of hydro raking and chemical treatment at a cost of $100,000 for 8 acres. It should be noted that both treatments will likely need to be repeated periodically.

39 Poontosuc Lake, Pittsfield, MA. Many treatment alternatives are being evaluated including (but not limited to) herbicide treatment, hand pulling, harvesting, benthic barriers & draw down. The cost of herbicide treatment alone is over $46,000. Poontosuc Lake is a 480 acre great pond. Principally, the lake’s problems are heavy infestations of exotic weeds, most notably Curly-leaved Pondweed and Eurasian Water Milfoil and high concentrations of pollutant loading from storm water runoff. Many treatment alternatives are being evaluated including (but not limited to) herbicide treatment, hand pulling, harvesting, benthic barriers & draw down. The cost of herbicide treatment alone is over $46,000.

40 Potential threats in Massachusetts

41 Zebra Mussels  The mussels can attach themselves to all types of living and nonliving surfaces  Once present in a water body, almost impossible to eradicate  Mussels choke out other animals and vegetation  Boats that have been in infested waters must be thoroughly disinfected by: Draining, flushing, cleaning & drying the boat Clean with bleach and high pressure water Boat must dry for at least one week in dry weather and up to 30 days in cool wet weather Recently found in Laurel Lake in Massachusetts

42 Invasive Aquatic Plants Water Chestnut Fanwort Eurasian Milfoil There are numerous invasive aquatic plants currently in Massachusetts, preventing them from entering the lake is critical!

43 Purple Loosestrife Although beautiful, this invasive plant can take over a wetland and choke out natural vegetation. Thanks to the “Loosestrife Vigilantes” many infestations of Loosestrife have been removed by hand pulling. You can help! Contact the LMG or the office for Information on removing loosestrife from your shoreline.

44 Public Education Public education and outreach is critical to the success of any Lake Management Plan. The LMG will continue to publish valuable information in the Waves, distribute literature and hold fun and educational events. Weed Classes provided by the Department of Conservation and Recreation will continue to be offered. Public education and outreach is critical to the success of any Lake Management Plan. The LMG will continue to publish valuable information in the Waves, distribute literature and hold fun and educational events. Weed Classes provided by the Department of Conservation and Recreation will continue to be offered. Visit the Hickory Hills website for more information on the LMG’s research. Visit the Hickory Hills website for more information on the LMG’s research. We encourage your active participation!

45 Lake Management Members Mario Andella Phyllis Andella Emily Arulpragasam Jega Arulpragasam Melvin (Tom) Bertram Paula Bertram Jack Biery Jeannette Biery Dana Dudley Suzanna Dudley Peggy Gorman Charlie Kimball Paul Lawn Jim LeBlanc Betty MacDonald Dave MacDonald Fred Malcomb Linda Malcomb Charles Martinec Joanne Martinec Mike Nault Bob Novacek Stephanie Novacek Diane Nowd Tommy Nowd Kathy Oliver Mario Pattacchiola Jean Pearson Ron Pearson Bernadette Progin Eileen Ramsden Kerry Sullivan Interested in Joining? Contact Betty MacDonald: * 978

46 QUESTIONS


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