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Welcome to Sport Flying. Ever Dreamed of Flying?

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Presentation on theme: "Welcome to Sport Flying. Ever Dreamed of Flying?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Welcome to Sport Flying

2 Ever Dreamed of Flying?

3 LSA Guidelines

4 . You should buy your new LSA from a company that will remain in business for many years to come. Made in the Czech Republic, over 350 flying as of 2010

5 . Established in 1948 Over 2500 LSA’s Flying

6 . Continental Powered Made in China Corrosion Proofed Great trainer Garmin Avionics CESSNA SKYCATCHER

7 . Roomy 46” wide & comfortable for 6’8” Pilot

8 . YOUR LSA SHOULD HAVE Easy to reach storage Room for two airline style carry on bags A minimum of 24 gallons Comfortable seats A cabin at least 43” wide

9 Take your grandchild camping Room for tents and sleeping bags in the wing lockers 17” x17” x 10” wing lockers

10 Remos… The folding wings are great for getting new students

11 . 43 Inch Wide Cabin Trumps the C172! 117 Knot Cruise 133 SF Wing 5 Hour Range/ 22 gals

12 30 gallon Fuel tanks means 6 hour endurance so you can fly into grass fields without fuel and have plenty of fuel for your return flight. Fly off grass-good Fly off pavement-good Taxi from grass to paved-bad

13 Modern Avionics such as Dual Dynons

14 EZ to use Garmin GPS TruTrak EFIS

15 Reliable push pull control rods Keep them lubricated

16 Large tie down ring accepts most ropes. Reliable all metal fuel vents and lines

17 Large NACA air vents provides plenty of fresh air for a cool cabin.

18 Stores Two Airline Style Carry on Bags. Cruises Comfortably At 135 mph on 5 Gallons of 91 Octane Auto Fuel or 100LL. Has an Allen screw on the underside of the horizontal stabilizer that must be tight. Your A&P must torque the gear leg bolts every 100 hours

19 Tecnam Negatives Carburetor air boxes are not installed on Tecnams or Vans RV-12 be careful!! Vent lines are made of plastic and can collapse. The Nose wheel is weak- do not brake in turns The electric trim box gets wet if exposed to rain. The tie down ring is small-carry 3/8” ropes.

20 The 100 HP Rotax Engine has a 2000 hour TBO A carburetor air box is recommended by Rotax and is standard on all Sport Cruisers and Remos aircraft. Tecnam does not install a carb air box Simple…no mixture

21 Rotax 912 ULS-100 HP Burns only 5 gph Electric Starting packs Internal Stator produces 18 amps continuous electricity Dual aneroid carbs Gear box High compression Weighs only 128 lbs

22 Rotax 912 ULS-100 HP Requires 120 degrees F prior to takeoff Keep CHT below 240 deg F on climb out It is okay to reduce power in the climb to keep temps under 240 degrees F It is okay to climb at 90 KIAS to keep CHT temperatures below 240 deg F

23 Many LSA stall below 30 knots The SPORT CRUISER STALLS AT 28 KIAS

24 LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT MUST BE FLOWN ON TO THE RUNWAY. DO NOT LAND USING A FULL STALL TECHNIQUE.

25 . The POH has the recommended approach speed. Our industry has historically used 1.3 times Vso as guide for a safe approach speed. For our light weight LSA a better formula is 1.5 times Vso. The Sport Cruiser’s Vso is 28 knots. 1.5 times Vso would have you approach at 42 KIAS. 55 KIAS on approach is better with a touch down speed of 40 knots.

26 DO NOT FLY WHEN THE CROSSWIND EXCEEDS 6 KNOTS UNTIL YOU HAVE 10 HOURS IN AN LSA

27 THERE IS NOT ENOUGH WIND PASSING OVER THE AILERONS TO CONTROL AN LSA IN A CROSSWIND IF YOU DO A FULL STALL LANDING

28 DO NOT DO FULL STALL LANDINGS IN AN LSA UNTIL YOU HAVE 10 HOURS IN LSAS AND THEN ONLY WHEN THE WIND IS CALM OR STRAIGHT DOWN THE RUNWAY.

29 EFIS Knobs To Adjust Baro and Heading. Round or Rectangular Display.

30 Garmin G340 Audio Panel

31 Questions?

32 Rotax 912 s/uls Weighs Only 128 Lbs. Allowing Greater Payloads. Keep CHT below 230C/110F on climb out by reducing power and climbing at 80 knots or more. If it is difficult to keep CHT below 230 F, check prop blade angles. For the Wood Comp degrees is maximum

33 Rotax 912 s/uls Climb at 80 knots and reduce power in climb to keep CHT below 230 C. Be sure to replenish coolant often during hot weather. Do not remove the coolant cap until system is cool to avoid introducing air into the system. High Compression Produces Power up to 15,600’!

34 Rotax 912 s/uls Weighs Only 128 Lbs. Allowing Greater Payloads. High Compression Produces Power up to 15,600’! Water Cooling Allows Climb at Vx on Hot Days.

35 Rotax 912 s/uls Weighs Only 128 Lbs. Allowing Greater Payloads. High Compression Produces Power up to 15,600’! Water Cooling Allows good climb, but use caution on Hot Days to 1 Gearbox Means Quiet 2100 rpm Cruise.

36 Rotax 912 s/uls Weighs Only 128 Lbs. Allowing Greater Payloads. High Compression Produces Power up to 15,600’! Water Cooling Allows Climb at Vx on Hot Days to 1 Gearbox Means Quiet 2100 rpm Cruise. Internal Stator Produces 18 Amps…No Alternator Required.

37 Rotax 912 s/uls Water Cooling Allows good climb, but use caution on Hot Days to 1 Gearbox Means Quiet 2100 rpm Cruise. Internal Stator Produces 18 Amps…No Alternator Required. Owner Maintenance Allowed After 2 Day Training.

38 Rotax 912 s/uls Water Cooling Allows Climb at Vx on Hot Days to 1 Gearbox Means Quiet 2100 rpm Cruise. Internal Stator Produces 18 Amps…No Alternator Required. Owner Maintenance Allowed After 2 Day Training. Stator Provides Fail Safe Electrical Output.

39 Rotax 912 s/uls Safe and Dependable Dual Aneroid Carburetors.

40 Rotax 912 s/uls Safe and Dependable Dual Aneroid Carburetors. Electric Starting Power Packs Out Perform Heavy Old Style Magnetos.

41 Rotax 912 s/uls Safe and Dependable Dual Aneroid Carburetors. Electric Starting Power Packs Out Perform Heavy Old Style Magnetos. Light Weight Starter Is not Exposed to Weather.

42 Rotax 912 s/uls Safe and Dependable Dual Aneroid Carburetors. Electric Starting Power Packs Out Perform Heavy Old Style Magnetos. Light Weight Starter Is not Exposed to Weather. Water and Air Cooling Prolong Engine Life.

43 Rotax 912 s/uls Light Weight Starter Is not Exposed to Weather. Water and Air Cooling Prolong Engine Life. Uses $4.00 Spark Plugs and 91 Octane Auto Fuel or 100LL.

44 Operational Tips

45 Flight Operations Tips Always move plane by pushing down on tail.

46 Flight Operations Tips Always move plane by pushing down on tail. Always land on the mains.

47 Flight Operations Tips Always move plane by pushing down on tail. Do not use brakes in a turn. Takeoff requires a lot of right rudder.

48 Flight Operations Tips Do not use brakes in a turn. Takeoff requires a lot of right rudder. Takeoff flaps are 15 degrees.

49 Flight Operations Tips Avoid liftoff below 40 knots.

50 Flight Operations Tips Avoid liftoff below 40 knots. Vy climb is about 70 knots for most LSA’s.

51 Flight Operations Tips Avoid liftoff below 40 knots. Vy climb of 70 knots gives good visibility. 100LL requires minimum of 5000 rpm in cruise to disperse lead.

52 Flight Operations Tips 4000 rpm is normal descent setting.

53 Flight Operations Tips 4000 rpm is normal descent setting. Full flaps for landings works great.

54 Flight Operations Tips Final approach at 60 knots 55 knots over the fence Touch down at 45 knots on the main gear

55 Flight Operations Tips Land without a crab Lower the nose only after you have slowed down

56 Flight Operations Tips Always land on the centerline Good landings are a result of good approaches.

57 Flight Operations Tips Aim for the numbers and make your approach at 60 knots

58 Flight Operations Tips On calm days aim short of the runway

59 Flight Operations Tips Always land in the first 500 feet.

60 Flight Operations Tips Slips are more effective if you mush first.

61 Flight Operations Tips Your approach should be stabilized at 200’ agl.

62 Flight Operations Tips Do not slip, mush, or add flaps below 200’ agl.

63 Flight Operations Tips If not stabilized at 100’ agl initiate a go-around.

64

65 Flight Operations Tips Excessive approach speed such as 70kts will cause the engine to idle excessively high.

66 Flight Operations Tips Approach speeds of 70 kts will be okay on a day with a 10 kt headwind, but on a calm day you may need 3000’ to land.

67 Flight Operations Tips Calm days will require full flap 55 knots and aiming 500 feet before the numbers.

68 Flight Operations Tips A power on approach at 50 knots will allow landings within 1500 feet.

69 Flight Operations Tips Always hold the nose wheel off the ground after landings Let the nose wheel down gently

70 Flight Operations Tips Speed should be below 15 kts before turning off the runway.

71 Flight Operations Tips The Tecnam nose wheel is fragile. To avoid damage, never apply brakes in a turn.

72 Flight Operations Tips Tecnam fuel tanks have plastic vent lines and have collapsed during cruise if one tank is selected. The Piper Sport has metal vent lines.

73 Flight Operations Tips Burn on one tank to correct fuel imbalance.

74 Flight Operations Tips 5200 rpm will produce knot cruise at 5.3 gph fuel burn.

75 Flight Operations Tips When using 100 LL you must cruise at 5000 RPM to avoid lead build up in the engine.

76 Flight Operations Tips Maneuvering speed (Va) is about 93 KIAS and should be used when flying in rough air.

77 Flight Operations Tips Smooth air cruise of knots is normal.

78 Flight Operations Tips Questions?

79 Top Gun Pilot Top gun pilots will land exactly on the centerline.

80 Top Gun Pilot Top gun pilots will land exactly on the centerline. Top gun pilots will use plenty of rudder and aileron to assure no side drift at touchdown.

81 Top Gun Pilot Top gun pilots will land exactly on the centerline. Top gun pilots will use plenty of rudder and aileron to assure no side drift at touchdown. Top gun pilots will always land on the main wheels.

82 Top Gun Pilot Top gun pilots will always land on the mains. Top gun pilots make smooth landings because they look way down the runway.

83 Top Gun Pilot Top gun pilots always land in the first 500’ of the runway.

84 Top Gun Pilot Top Gun Pilots always check the CHT on climb out Top gun pilots will fly with their CFI on a windy cross wind day once per year.

85 Top Gun Pilot Questions?

86 Rotax 912 Operational Tips Gearbox requires power descents and 1800 rpm idle

87 Rotax 912 Operational Tips Gearbox requires power descents and 1800 rpm idle After a few days oil will not appear on dipstick requiring the pilot to “burp” the engine.

88 Rotax 912 Operational Tips After a few days oil will not appear on dipstick requiring the pilot to “burp” the engine. Burping requires the prop to be turned counter clockwise about 20 times

89 Rotax 912 Operational Tips The throttle must be closed for the choke to operate.

90 Rotax 912 Operational Tips Choke only works with closed throttle. 50 degrees C coolant temp is required for takeoff. Keep CHT below 230C by reducing power on climb out.

91 Rotax 912 Operational Tips Choke only works with closed throttle. 50 degrees C coolant temp required for takeoff. Max continuous power is 5500 rpm

92 Rotax 912 Operational Tips 75 Percent Cruise is approx 5200rpm at 5.3 gph

93 Rotax 912 Operational Tips 75 Percent Cruise approx 5200rpm at 5.3 gph On shutdown assure throttle is at idle and turn off starting packs (magnetos) one at a time.

94 Rotax 912 Operational Tips On shutdown assure throttle is at idle, and turn off starting packs (magnetos) one at a time. Coolant drains back into the engine on shutdown. Bottle should be ¼ full when the engine is cold.

95 Rotax 912 Operational Tips Questions?


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