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E3 Alliance Food for Thought Presentation #3 May 19, 2010 Dr. Ed Fuller, PhD Education Consultant 1.

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Presentation on theme: "E3 Alliance Food for Thought Presentation #3 May 19, 2010 Dr. Ed Fuller, PhD Education Consultant 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 E3 Alliance Food for Thought Presentation #3 May 19, 2010 Dr. Ed Fuller, PhD Education Consultant 1

2 --Higher rates of teacher turnover are associated with poorer student outcomes (Fuller, Young, Baker, 2007a,b; Fields, & Jablonski, 2007) --Schools with high levels of principal retention tend to have higher levels of teacher retention (Fuller, Young, Baker, 2007a,b) -- In high-turnover schools, students may be more likely to have inexperienced teachers who we know are less effective on average (Rockoff, 2004; Rivkin et al., 2005; Kane et al., 2006) 2

3 -- “High turnover creates instability in schools, making it more difficult to have coherent instruction. This instability may be particularly problematic in schools trying to implement reforms, as new teachers coming in each year are likely to repeat mistakes, rather than improve upon reform implementation.” (Boyd, 2009) -- “High turnover can be costly in that time and effort is needed to continuously recruit teachers.” (Boyd, 2009) 3

4  Individual educator data (teachers, principals, asst principals, other school professionals) as collected through PEIMS  Turnover was calculated at the full-time equivalent (FTE) level, not the person level  Student mobility was obtained through AEIS reports on the TEA website  This study included only schools with teachers in the through school years and that had a regular accountability rating in the through school years. 4

5 5

6 6 Grouping% of Students BilingualAfr AmerMinorityEco Dis Lowest % Quartile Quartile Highest %

7 7

8 8 Grouping% of Students BilingualAfr AmerMinorityEco Dis Lowest % Quartile Quartile Highest %

9 9

10 10 Grouping% of Students Afr AmerMinorityEco Dis Lowest % Quartile Quartile Highest %

11 11

12 12 Performance Level ElemMSHS Lowest Performing Lower Performing Average Performing Higher Performing Highest Performing

13 13

14 14 Grouping% of Students BilingualAfr AmerMinorityEco Dis Lowest % Quartile Quartile Highest %

15 15 Grouping% of Students BilingualAfr AmerMinorityEco Dis Lowest % 44.6%48.0%46.7%46.6% Quartile %49.7%48.5%48.8% Quartile %52.8%51.4%51.6% Highest % 61.4%56.9%61.2%

16 16 Grouping% of Students BilingualAfr AmerMinorityEco Dis Lowest % Quartile Quartile Highest %

17 17 Grouping% of Students BilingualAfr AmerMinorityEco Dis Lowest %51.7%49.7%49.9%51.1% Quartile 256.2%55.1%60.3%53.4% Quartile 356.3%57.9%52.9%58.5% Highest %61.6%60.8%61.8%63.0%

18 18 Grouping% of Students Afr AmerMinorityEco Dis Lowest % Quartile Quartile Highest %

19 19 Grouping% of Students Afr AmerMinorityEco Dis Lowest %45.6%42.6%43.5% Quartile 244.5%46.4%44.7% Quartile 350.8%52.5%51.0% Highest %54.9%57.6%57.9%

20 20 Performance LevelElemMSHS Lowest Performing61.4%58.3%57.7% Lower Performing52.0%60.5%54.7% Average Performing50.3%62.5%48.0% Higher Performing48.9%53.6%48.9% Highest Performing45.0%51.5%41.8%

21 21 Student Mobility RateElemMSHS Lowest %44.3%48.8%42.5% Quartile 246.1%57.5%46.0% Quartile 355.6%58.1%53.0% Highest %60.5%61.6%56.1%

22 22 Student MobilitySchool Level RateELMS*HS* Lowest %51.0%86.4%68.8% Quartile 237.7%75.0%84.6% Quartile 334.4%63.6%38.5% Highest %30.2%76.2%46.2% * 1 or fewer for MS and HS, zero for elem school

23 23 # PrincipalSchool Level Transitions ELMSHS

24 24 Student Mobility Rate ElemMSHS Lowest %6.6%9.1%5.2% Quartile 26.1%9.1%7.0% Quartile 311.1%9.8%9.7% Highest %11.9%14.2%12.2%

25 25 Student Mobility RateElemMSHS Lowest %56.7%58.2%58.9% Quartile 262.1%61.3%63.0% Quartile 360.7%73.4%67.7% Highest %66.4%78.7%66.8%

26  “Ms. W is my math teacher, she teaches Algebra--the best teacher. She is the only teacher that taught me the entire school year. Since freshmen year I’ve never had a math teacher stay and teach me the whole year.” 26

27  “I’m pretty sure we had three different principals. And it’s changed a lot, but for the better because now we have Dr. X. He cares a lot more about student voices and student perspective and stuff, when all our other principals--I never saw them step out on the carpet.” 27

28 Why are we surprised at achievement gaps when we systematically deny students in certain schools the well-qualified, stable educators that they deserve? Students most in need of sustained, caring relationships with well-qualified educators are the least likely to be in schools with stable adult populations. 28

29 Students most in need of sustained, caring relationships with adults are the least likely to be in schools with stable adult populations. Schools with greater student mobility have greater teacher, principal, assistant principal, and school professional staff turnover. Student mobility and educator turnover are associated with student achievement, with greater mobility and turnover rates negatively associated with student achievement. 29

30  The failure of school districts to address the distribution of well-qualified educators and the high turnover rate of educators has led directly to the proliferation of charter schools serving the needs of poor students who are striving to achieve at the highest levels possible. 30

31 Greater pay for educators serving in schools with greater student mobility (the money exists, but is hidden) Measure and improve working conditions for teachers and principals Improve and refine HR strategies to place experienced and effective educators in schools most in need of high-quality staff 31

32 Ed Fuller, PhD Education Consultant 32


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