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Diversity Update 2010 September 2010

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Presentation on theme: "Diversity Update 2010 September 2010"— Presentation transcript:

1 Diversity Update 2010 September 2010

2 Equity Scorecard Framework AccessExcellence Institutional Receptivity Retention Equity in Educational Outcomes The Equity Scorecard was developed by Dr. Estela Mara Bensimon at the Center for Urban Education, University of Southern California (http://www.usc.edu/dept/education/CUE/). Each of the four perspectives has an objective. From this objective we can: -Measure baseline performance -Set an improvement target -Work towards equity in educational outcomes.

3 Identities for Analysis This presentation is limited to identities for which we have quantitative information, including:  Race/ethnicity  Income level  First-generation in college  Gender  Geographic diversity. Information is not systematically available for other groups that are important to inclusive excellence.

4 Components: Enrollment – Undergraduate – Graduate – Professional – School/College Pipeline Financial Aid/Need-Based Aid Majors/Degrees AccessExcellence Institutional Receptivity Retention Access Equity in Educational Outcomes

5 From 2000 to 2010  4.9 percentage point increase in Minority Enrollment  3.9 percentage point increase in Targeted Minority Enrollment Access: Enrollment Targeted Minorities include African American, Native American, Hispanic/Latino/a, Southeast Asian (Cambodians, Laotians, Vietnamese, and Hmong). Minorities include targeted minorities as well as Other Asians and Native Hawaiians. International students are not counted for targeted minority collections.

6 Race/Ethnic Categories: Students  Continued terminology from Plan 2008  Useful for national comparisons  Excludes all Asians, useful for national peer comparisons. Targeted Minorities include: » African American » Native American » Hispanic/Latino/a » Southeast Asian (Cambodians, Laotians, Vietnamese, and Hmong) Minorities include: » Targeted Minority categories » Other Asians » Native Hawaiians Underrepresented Minorities include: » African American » Native American » Hispanic/Latino/a » Native Hawaiian Students self-identify their race/ethnicity at the time of application. International students are not counted in any of these collections.

7 Access: Enrollment Reporting Methodologies for Race/Ethnicity Information The relatively new ability to indicate multiple race/ethnic values results in a much richer picture of student diversity but data reporting is more complicated. To deal with these complexities, methodology options for data reporting have emerged. The method that is most appropriate depends on for what purpose the data will be used. The table below describes the features of each method and shows how the methods are similar and different from each other. Reporting FeaturePrimaryFederalCount All Results in single count of students   Prioritizes Hispanic/Latina(a) over other values  Creates new categories that are not reported by students themselves  Displays race/ethnic values only for domestic (non international) students  Displays ALL students who indicate a particular race/ethnicity  Prioritizes some race/ethnicities over others  Used in external data reporting and rankings 

8 Access: Enrollment Fall 2010 UW-Madison Students by Race/Ethnicity and Methodology “Primary”FederalCount All Hispanic/Latino(a)1,5841,610 Black or African American1,2331,0891,313 American Indian or Alaska Native Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Asian2,4382,2162,205 White31,301 32,278 Two or more races Unknown1,317 International4,262 Total42,598 43,771 Subsequent slides use “Primary” race/ethnic methodology

9 From 2000 to 2010:  Increases in undergraduate enrollment in all race/ethnic categories  3.9 percentage point increase in undergraduate targeted minority enrollment Access: Enrollment Targeted Minorities include African American, Native American, Hispanic/Latino/a, Southeast Asian (Cambodians, Laotians, Vietnamese, and Hmong). International students are not counted within the targeted minority categories.

10 From 2000 to 2010:  3.2 percentage point increase in first-year undergraduate targeted minority enrollment Access: Enrollment Targeted Minorities include African American, Native American, Hispanic/Latino/a, Southeast Asian (Cambodians, Laotians, Vietnamese, and Hmong). International students are not counted within the targeted minority categories.

11 Access: Enrollment Targeted Minorities include African American, Native American, Hispanic/Latino/a, Southeast Asian (Cambodians, Laotians, Vietnamese, and Hmong). International students are not counted within the targeted minority categories. From 2000 to 2010:  Increases in graduate student enrollment in all race/ethnic categories  2.4 percentage point increase in graduate targeted minority enrollment

12 From 2000 to 2010:  Increases in professional student enrollment in all race/ethnic categories  0.8 percentage point increase in professional targeted minority enrollment Access: Enrollment Targeted Minorities include African American, Native American, Hispanic/Latino/a, Southeast Asian (Cambodians, Laotians, Vietnamese, and Hmong). International students are not counted within the targeted minority categories.

13 Access: Enrollment International Enrollment:  1,672 Undergraduate Students  2,252 Graduate Students  93 Professional Students  International students make up 10% of all enrollment.

14 From 2005 to 2010:  ↑ 5.3% increase in Pell Grant Recipients  Steady First Generation Enrollment  ↑ 1.4% increase in Targeted Minorities Access: Enrollment

15 In 2010, the College of Letters and Science has the largest number of undergraduate targeted minority students enrolled. The School of Human Ecology has the largest percentage of undergraduate targeted minority students enrolled, with 15 percent of SoHE students identifying as targeted minorities. Access: Enrollment Targeted Minorities include African American, Native American, Hispanic/Latino/a, Southeast Asian (Cambodians, Laotians, Vietnamese, and Hmong). International students are not counted within the targeted minority categories.

16 From Increases in targeted minority enrollment in all schools and colleges. The largest percentage increases in Pharmacy and the School of Human Ecology Access: Enrollment Targeted Minorities include African American, Native American, Hispanic/Latino/a, Southeast Asian (Cambodians, Laotians, Vietnamese, and Hmong). International students are not counted within the targeted minority categories.

17 Fall 2010 Education and Law have the highest percentages (16% and 15%, respectively) of targeted minority graduate/professional students. Access: Enrollment Targeted Minorities include African American, Native American, Hispanic/Latino/a, Southeast Asian (Cambodians, Laotians, Vietnamese, and Hmong). International students are not counted within the targeted minority categories.

18 Access: Enrollment Targeted Minorities include African American, Native American, Hispanic/Latino/a, Southeast Asian (Cambodians, Laotians, Vietnamese, and Hmong). International students are not counted within the targeted minority categories.

19 Access: Enrollment Targeted Minorities include African American, Native American, Hispanic/Latino/a, Southeast Asian (Cambodians, Laotians, Vietnamese, and Hmong). International students are not counted within the targeted minority categories. Individuals who indicate more than one race have a primary race selected giving precedence to the least prevalent race/ethnicity within Wisconsin’s population.

20 Access: Enrollment Targeted Minorities include African American, Native American, Hispanic/Latino/a, Southeast Asian (Cambodians, Laotians, Vietnamese, and Hmong). International students are not counted within the targeted minority categories.

21 Access: Enrollment Targeted Minorities include African American, Native American, Hispanic/Latino/a, Southeast Asian (Cambodians, Laotians, Vietnamese, and Hmong). International students are not counted within the targeted minority categories. Individuals who indicate more than one race have a primary race selected giving precedence to the least prevalent race/ethnicity within Wisconsin’s population.

22 Fall 2010  Women make up over 60% of undergraduate enrollment in Education, SoHE, and Nursing  Women make up less than 40% of undergraduate enrollment in Engineering. Access: Enrollment

23 Fall 2010  Women make up over 60% of graduate/professional student enrollment in Education, SoHE, Nelson Institute, Nursing, and Veterinary Medicine  Women make up less than 40% of graduate/professional student enrollment in Business and Engineering. Access: Enrollment

24 Access: Enrollment

25 Access: Enrollment Home County of UW-Madison Undergraduate Students (Wisconsin Residents) Among the 72 Wisconsin counties, each is represented by at least 6 undergraduate students in Fall There are 18,181 Wisconsin Resident undergraduates enrolled in Fall Black: More than 4% of resident undergraduates from county Dark Gray: Between 2% and 4% of resident undergraduates from county Light Gray: Less than 2% (but at least one student) of resident undergraduates from county

26 Access: Enrollment Students from Farms: Home County of UW-Madison Undergraduates from Wisconsin Farms* in *Students from farms are identified by the presence of farm income on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). There may be undergraduates from Wisconsin farms who did not apply for financial aid. Black: More than 4% of undergraduates from farms Dark Gray: Between 2% and 4% of undergraduates from farms Light Gray: Less than 2% (but at least one undergraduate) from farms White: No undergraduates from farms

27 Access: Enrollment Home County of UW-Madison Undergraduate FASTrack Participants in FASTrack is a financial aid program that assures a student’s financial need will be met each year for four years. Single, financially dependent students are considered for the program based on the family's current and past financial situation and need for assistance. Both work and borrowing are minimized to reduce the student's financial burden. All students who apply for aid are considered for FASTrack, there is no special application. Qualifying students are selected by the Office of Student Financial Aid. Black: More than 4% of undergraduates in the FASTrack program Dark Gray: Between 2% and 4% of undergraduates in the FASTrack program Light Gray: Less than 2% (but at least one student) of undergraduates in the FASTrack program White: No undergraduate participants in the FASTrack program

28 Access: Diversity Programs Programs that increase access and success for underrepresented populations on campus Programs with a Pre-College Component – PEOPLE – POSSE Student Support Programs – CeO (formerly TRIO) – Academic Advancement Program Scholarship Programs – Chancellor’s Scholars – Powers/Knapp – First Wave Academic Excellence Communities

29 Access: Enrollment *Targeted Minorities include African American, Native American, Hispanic/Latino/a, Southeast Asian (Cambodians, Laotians, Vietnamese, and Hmong). International students are not counted within the targeted minority categories. Academic Excellence Community Total Participants Targeted Minority* Male First Generation Academic Advancement Program (AAP) 43195%44%18% Center for Educational Opportunity (CEO) 54191%38%92% PEOPLE32390%40%53% Posse12081%45%68% First Wave43100%37%63% Chancellor’s Scholar Program %38%40% Powers/Knapp Program %44%55% All Undergraduates28,8809%48%22% Fall 2010 Undergraduate Participation in Academic Excellence Communities

30 Access: Pipeline: Minority Students “Well-prepared” high school graduates are in the top quartile of their graduating classes and score at least 22 (WI Average) on the ACT (or equivalent SAT score). “Minority” refers to students who identify as African American, Asian, Hispanic/ Latino/a, or Native American. South East Asians are unable to be separated from all other Asians in the Department of Public Instruction data.

31 Access: Pipeline UW-Madison’s Wisconsin Resident Recruiting Pool, by Race/Ethnicity

32 Access: Pipeline All groups except for Hispanic/Latino/a graduates are projected to see a decline in the number of high school graduates due to the current age structure of the population. Source: APL High School Graduate Projections, March 2008

33 Access: Pipeline: First Generation *“Potential” First Generation Students does not imply any level of academic achievement, school enrollment, or preparedness. This estimate reflects the population with no parent/guardian in the household with a Bachelor’s Degree. Sources: Overall WI Population (U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, Estimates), Potential First Generation Students (“Parental Education and College Participation Rates in Wisconsin”, Sara Lazenby, August 2009), Applicants, Admits, and Enrolls for School Year An estimated 75% of year old Wisconsin residents live in households where no parent/guardian holds a bachelor’s degree. Approximately 26% of UW- Madison Resident New Freshman are first- generation students. We do not have a reliable data source on high school graduation or college preparedness by parental education levels for Wisconsin residents.

34 Access: Pipeline: Low Income “Economically Disadvantaged” represents those students who are eligible for free/reduced lunch. Sources: Wisconsin DPI WINSS, Enrollment by Student Group, Completions by Student Group UW-Madison Data based on Fall % of Public K-12 students in Wisconsin are Economically Disadvantaged ( ) 23%of Public High School Graduates are Economically Disadvantaged ( ) We have no reliable information on income of applicant students, all data based on financial aid applications 16% of Resident New Freshmen are Pell Grant Recipients

35 Access: Pipeline: Minority 21% of Public High School students in Wisconsin are minority students( ) 18%of Public High School Graduates are minority students ( ) 15% of Resident New Freshmen are minority students “Well-prepared” high school graduates are in the top quartile of their graduating classes and score at least 22 (WI Average) on the ACT (or equivalent SAT score). This does not reflect any policies by UW-Madison admissions with regards to academic preparation requirements.

36 Access: Pipeline Rural high school students apply at lower rates than other students Once they apply, they admit and enroll at rates proportional to their application rate. Source: High School Characteristics and Early Academic Performance at UW-Madison, Clare Huhn, APA, 2005

37 Access: Pipeline Targeted Minority New Freshmen Fall 2009 / Fall New Freshmen (630)2001 New Freshmen (389) Non-Residents (250) WI Residents (380) Non-Residents (143) WI Residents (246) Illinois (80) POSSE (8) Milwaukee (97) PEOPLE (27) Illinois (42) Milwaukee (76) Other (72)Other (70) Minnesota (57) Dane (89) PEOPLE (31) Minnesota (36) Dane (54) Other (58) California (18) POSSE (9) Waukesha (25) California (9) Waukesha (16) Other (9) DC/Maryland (12) POSSE (7) Racine (14) PEOPLE (2) New York (7) Brown (12) Other (5)Other (12) Other States (83) Marathon (14) Other States (49) Outagamie (10) Kenosha (10) Kenosha (7) Other Counties (131) PEOPLE (6) Other Counties (71) Other (125) The first PEOPLE/POSSE students entered college in 2002

38 Access: Pipeline Targeted Minority New Transfers in Fall 2009 / Fall New Transfers(71)2001 New Transfers (68) Non-Residents (18) WI Residents (53) Non- Residents (21) WI Residents (47) Dane (26) Dane (22) Milwaukee (6) Milwaukee (6) Other Counties (21) Other Counties (19) Note: The PEOPLE program existed in 2001 but its students were still in high school.

39 Access: Pipeline New Targeted Minority Undergraduates in Fall 2001 and Fall 2009 Large increases (389 to 630 students) in new freshmen targeted minority enrollments Stable population of new transfer targeted minority enrollments Increases in new freshman from several Wisconsin counties. Increases in both in-state and out-of- state new targeted minority students More out-of-state students from DC/Maryland

40 Access: Applicants, Admits, and Enrolls Targeted minority and first-generation admitted applicants are more likely to enroll than the overall population of admits. Domestic non-residents are the least likely to enroll after being admitted.

41 Access: Applicants, Admits, and Enrolls Transfer students are more likely to apply without meeting the minimum requirements for admission Admit rates for transfer applicants are slightly lower than that for freshmen applicants for most groups. Transfer students are more likely to enroll at UW-Madison than their new freshmen counterparts. This is especially true of resident transfers.

42 Percent of Undergraduates who are Underrepresented Minorities at AAU Public Institutions, Fall 2008 Average Percent Underrepresented Minority for AAU Public Institutions: 13% 6 AAU Public Institutions have a lower percent of underrepresented minorities than UW-Madison. 9 AAU Public Institutions have a smaller number of underrepresented minorities than UW-Madison. Access: Peers Source: IPEDS Fall Enrollment, Fall 2008 Note: Underrepresented Minority does NOT include South East Asians when looking at peer data. 50%

43 Access: Comparisons UW-Madison had 2,750 targeted minority undergraduates (Fall 2009) There are 2,528 institutions in the United States that grant bachelor’s degrees. Of these, only 816 (32.3%) have more total undergraduates enrolled than UW-Madison has targeted minority undergraduates enrolled There are 48 institutions in Wisconsin that grant bachelor’s degrees. Of these, only 18 (38%) have more total undergraduates enrolled than UW-Madison has targeted minority students enrolled UW-Madison educates relatively large numbers of minority students

44 Percent of Undergraduates who Pell Recipients at AAU Public Institutions, Fall 2008 Average Percent Pell Recipients for AAU Public Institutions: 20% 1 AAU Public Institution has a lower percent of Pell recipients than UW-Madison. 9 AAU Public Institutions have a lower number of Pell recipients than UW-Madison. Access: Peers Source: IPEDS Fall Enrollment, Fall % Pell Grants are federally funded grants for students with high financial need. This indicator is a proxy for low income student enrollments.


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