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Panel Presenters Debra Vinci, DrPH, RD Associate Chair, Dept HLES Mica Harrell, MA, CHES Assistant Director of Health Promotion Services Robert Philen,

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Presentation on theme: "Panel Presenters Debra Vinci, DrPH, RD Associate Chair, Dept HLES Mica Harrell, MA, CHES Assistant Director of Health Promotion Services Robert Philen,"— Presentation transcript:

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2 Panel Presenters Debra Vinci, DrPH, RD Associate Chair, Dept HLES Mica Harrell, MA, CHES Assistant Director of Health Promotion Services Robert Philen, PhD Assistant Professor, Anthropology Susan Walch, PhD Associate Professor, Psychology Steven Walker, BS Grant Coordinator & MS Psychology Graduate Student Patsy Malley, MS Grant Coordinator & Doctoral Graduate Student

3 Workshop Objectives 1.Provide an overview of the US DOE Model Program Grant. 2.Describe the theoretical framework used to develop evidenced- based alcohol prevention programming. 3.Discuss role of needs assessment data. 4.Discuss how to transition to an evidence based program. 5.Explain role of program evaluation team in alcohol programming efforts. 6.Describe process in applying for a DOE Model Program funding.

4 What is a DOE Model Program? Purpose of Program (Federal Register 4/1/08) ▫Identify and disseminate information about exemplary and effective alcohol or other drug abuse prevention programs implemented on college campuses. ▫U.S. DOE also will recognize colleges and universities whose programs, while not yet exemplary or effective, show evidence that they are promising.

5 Definitions Exemplary: Program with strong theoretical base ▫Demonstrated effectiveness in reducing alcohol/drug abuse or reducing problems resulting from alcohol or drug use among college students using an experimental design in which students are randomly assigned to participate in a project being evaluated (treatment group) or not participate in the project (control group). Effective: Program with strong theoretical base ▫Program evaluated using either an experimental or quasi- experimental design, with the evaluation results suggesting effectiveness in reducing alcohol or drug abuse among college students, reducing problems resulting from alcohol or drug use among college students, reducing risk factors, enhancing protective factors, or resulting in some combination of those impacts. Promising: Program with strong theoretical base ▫Evidence obtained using limited research methods that include pre- and post- treatment measurement of the effects of a treatment on a single subject or group of single subjects. ▫Program may reduce alcohol or drug abuse among college students, reduce problems resulting from alcohol or other drug use among college students, reduce risk factors, enhance protective factors, or result in some combination of those impacts.

6 Application Guidelines To meet the priority, an applicant must: 1.Describe the program that has been implemented for at least two full years; include the structure and content of the program, the student population that is targeted by the program, and any unique features of the program. 2. Provide a detailed theoretical basis for the program's effectiveness. 3. Provide data to demonstrate the program's impact on the target student population, including evidence of cognitive or behavioral changes, or both, among the target population;. 4. Consent to a site visit to clarify information in the application and verify evaluation data

7 Theoretical Frameworks Guiding force in developing evidenced-based alcohol prevention programming.  NIAA Report, A Call to Action & 3 in 1 Framework ▫Tiers of Effectiveness ▫Level of Impact  Social Ecological Framework ▫Individuals ▫Group ▫Institution ▫Community ▫Public Policy

8 Program Transition Continue elements of the current program as usual Assess where your current program components fall amongst the 3 Ts ▫Tiers ▫Type of Prevention ▫Target of Impact Add new evidence-based programs Recruit others to help with program evaluation

9 UWF You Have Choices! Goals of program are to reduce alcohol misuse and the incidence of negative consequences related to alcohol consumption. Program utilizes environmental strategies ▫UWF Campus Alcohol Coalition, Pensacola Underage Drinking Task Force, Representation on Executive Board of the FL Higher Education Alliance for Substance Abuse Prevention ▫Review/revise alcohol marketing and sales policies ▫Input into guidelines for disciplinary action for alcohol violations Social Norms Campaign Informational, knowledge-and motivation-based interventions ▫e-CHUG ▫CHOICES with new Greek recruits ▫BASICS for judicial sanctions Peer Education

10 Enhanced UWF You Have Choices! The proposed model grant funding would allow for further assessment to measure the effectiveness of the various interventions targeted toward the individual student: ▫UWF Freshmen Academic Foundation Seminar course ▫Personalized Normative Feedback Seminar with Incoming High- Risk Freshmen Strengthening the program’s impact on the student body as a whole: ▫Social Norms/Health Communication Campaign Continue environmental management strategies

11 Role of Needs Assessment Data Increased networking across campus ▫Student Affairs Administration ▫Health Promotion Services ▫Academic Affairs Needs assessment drives future research which then drives alcohol prevention programming. ▫Important process in becoming a Model Program Provides opportunity for health promotions staff and graduate students to be involved in creating evidenced- based programs.

12 Program Evaluation: UWF Behavioral Health Research Collaborative 1.Essential for comprehensive data collection and analysis. 2.Getting started 1.Identify departments on campus who have faculty studying health behavior such as anthropology, health education, nursing, psychology, and social work. 2.Determine if there are committees on campus that address health behavior such as an HIV committee, Healthy Relationships Task Force, and/or Campus Alcohol Coalition. 3.Send an to faculty and committee members telling them about your role on campus and your interest in research and ask persons interested in working collaboratively on research to contact you. 4.Send a follow-up invitation inviting everyone to an introductory meeting on an interdisciplinary research team.

13 Faculty Participation Benefits of participation 1. Connections 2. Research partnerships 3. Motivation Recommendations for engaging faculty

14 Student’s Perspective Research Opportunities ▫Academic Foundation Seminars  Instrument Development  Data Entry Issues  Logistical Coordination ▫Social Norms Campaign  Poster Development  Messaging (focus groups)  Photo Shoot  Intercept Interviews ▫Personalized Normative Feedback  Survey Monkey

15 Becoming a DOE Model Program Check DOE’s Higher Education Center web site for grant and national meeting announcements (http://www.higheredcenter.org/).http://www.higheredcenter.org/ Identify selected departments and/or faculty members to participate in an interdisciplinary research team. Come up with a couple of projects for applied research. Look for funding – NCAA and/or local, state, and regional mini-grants. Let go of your ego. Collaborate with key campus and community stakeholders for coalition. Outline the mutual benefits this could offer. Determine what data you are already collecting and start analyzing the data. Start writing. Be persistent.

16 Questions?? Debra Vinci, DrPH, RD Mica Harrell, MA, CHES Robert Philen, PhD Susan Walch, PhD Steven Walker, BS Patsy Malley, MS


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