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Presentation on theme: "Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Student Health and Safety Guide: For International Travel Faculty of Arts McGill."— Presentation transcript:

1 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Student Health and Safety Guide: For International Travel Faculty of Arts McGill University Faculty of Arts McGill University

2 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Managing Your Safety Abroad Consular Services Passports Visas & Work Permits Insurance Local Laws & Customs Physical Safety What to do in case of an emergency For the Female Traveler Managing Your Health Managing Your Finances Managing Your Intercultural Effectiveness Contents

3 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show In this section Managing Your Safety Managing Your Safety 1. Consular Services 2. Passports, Visas, and Work Permits 3. Insurance 4. Local Laws and Customs 5. Avoiding Risks 6. What to Do In Case of Emergency 7. For the Female Traveler

4 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show The Consular Affairs Bureau is committed to helping Canadians prepare for foreign travel and to providing you with a variety of services once you are abroad. The Consular Affairs Bureau’s website provides an abundance of information about foreign destinations, about how to prepare for your departure from Canada, and about the variety of services offered to Canadians abroad. Prior to departure, check where the nearest Canadian Embassy or Consulate is located, and record the information in a safe location. Contact information for these offices is provided at Consular Services Managing Your Safety: Consular Services Managing Your Safety: Consular Services

5 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Consular Services provide the following services, but not always for free ($ indicates that you must pay for the services): In emergencies: Assist in arranging an evacuation in the event of war, civil unrest, or a natural disaster, as a last resort (your insurance should cover this) ($). Arrange help in a medical emergency by providing you with a list of local doctors and hospitals. Arrange for a medical evacuation if a necessary treatment is not available locally ($). Comfort and assist victims of robbery, sexual assault, or other violence. Consular Services in Emergencies Managing Your Safety: Consular Services Managing Your Safety: Consular Services

6 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show When legal issues arise, Consular Services provide the following: Provide you with a list of local lawyers. Provide you with sources of information about local laws and regulations. Seek to ensure that you are treated fairly under a country’s laws if you are arrested or detained Consular Services for Legal Issues Managing Your Safety: Consular Services Managing Your Safety: Consular Services

7 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show In addition to emergency and legal issues, Consular Services provide the following services when other issues arise: Replace a lost, stolen, damaged, or expired passport ($). Provide an emergency loan, subject to strict rules and only as a last resort ($). Transfer funds ($). Contact relatives or friends and ask them to send you money or airline tickets. Contact next of kin, with your authorization, if you have had an accident or are detained by police. Request that local authorities investigate suspicious circumstances in the event of an alleged or apparent crime or death. Other Consular Services Managing Your Safety: Consular Services Managing Your Safety: Consular Services

8 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Consular Officials DO NOT Provide the Following Services: Intervene in private legal matters. Provide legal advice. Obtain a criminal record check on your behalf. Post bail or pay fines or legal fees. Get you out of prison. Ask local authorities to give preferential treatment to Canadians. Not Offered by Consular Services Managing Your Safety: Consular Services Managing Your Safety: Consular Services

9 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Emergency Consular Services: Emergency consular assistance is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Outside of office hours, your telephone call will automatically be transferred to a consular officer in Ottawa or you will be asked to leave a message for a return call. From some countries, you can use a toll-free number to speak to a consular officer in Ottawa. In addition, you can make a collect call to Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada in Ottawa at (where available). In some locations where Canada does not have a local office, an Australian or British government office will provide you with emergency services. These and possibly other foreign government offices can also contact the nearest Canadian office on your behalf. Check the List of Canadian Government Offices Abroad for information on how to contact the Canadian office(s) in the country you plan to visit. Contacting Consular Services Managing Your Safety: Consular Services Managing Your Safety: Consular Services

10 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Foreign Affairs Canada provides extensive information on countries around the world. Read this information carefully to gain an understanding of your country and its unique characteristics before you leave for your internship. Knowledge of these characteristics, customs, and potential challenges will enable you to prepare for potential problems before they happen, thereby allowing you to be ready should they occur. Country Travel Reports: Consult the Country Travel Reports before your departure to find out about safety and security conditions, health questions and entry requirements for the country or countries to which you are going. Foreign Affairs Canada publishes reports for over 200 destinations around the world. See Travel Updates: While abroad, it is possible to receive daily travel updates from Foreign Affairs Canada notifying you of changes to the “Current Issues” section of their website (which provides information on situations that may affect the security of Canadians) and of changes to the “Country Travel Reports” section (providing information on safety and security issues, health concerns, and entry requirements). For these updates, you must submit your name and at en.asp.www.voyage.gc.ca/dest/ctry/sub- en.asp Travel Reports and Updates Managing Your Safety: Consular Services Managing Your Safety: Consular Services

11 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Publications Produced by the Department of Foreign Affairs Bon Voyage, But Traveller’s Checklist Working Aboard: Unravelling the Maze Her Own Way: A Woman’s Guide to Safe and Successful Travel Drugs and Travel: Why they don’t mix A Guide for Canadians Imprisoned Abroad Well on Your Way: A Canadian’s Guide to Healthy Travel Abroad For more detailed information, consult the Canadian Consular Services publications online Publications Managing Your Safety: Consular Services Managing Your Safety: Consular Services

12 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Registry for Canadians Abroad All students must register with their own country’s embassy or consulate. The local embassy or consulate can keep you up to date with important events at home such as elections, as well as provide you with information about sudden changes in political or environmental conditions in your host country. Registering with the Embassy or Consulate also facilitates emergency evacuation should this be necessary. Canadians: register online with ROCA (Registry for Canadians Abroad) Indicate “Visitor Work” in question 13 Upon arrival in your host country contact your country’s consulate/embassy to activate your registration. All other nationalities: register with your government’s embassy/consulate in your host country Managing Your Safety: Consular Services Managing Your Safety: Consular Services

13 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show November 6, 2007 :: Annual Internship Panel

14 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show You should have a valid passport for all trips outside Canada. A passport is the only reliable and universally accepted identification document, and it proves that you have a right to return to Canada Some countries require that your passport be valid for six months beyond your date of departure. Check the Country Travel Report for your destination to establish whether the six-month rule applies. Passport office in Montreal: West Tower, Suite 803, Complexe Guy-Favreau, 200 René-Lévesque Blvd. W. Passports Managing Your Safety: Passports Managing Your Safety: Passports

15 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show While away... Keep your passport safe Your passport is a valuable document. Protect it at all times. Do not leave it unattended in your baggage, automobile, hotel room or elsewhere. Make 2 copies of the identification page Leave one at home Take the other with you and carry it separately from your passport Reporting the loss or theft of a passport or travel document As soon as a passport or travel document is believed to be lost or stolen, the bearer is required to report the circumstances of the loss or theft to Consular Services at your nearest embassy or consulate. Keeping your Passport Safe Managing Your Safety: Passports Managing Your Safety: Passports

16 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show In almost all instances, visas must be obtained before entering another country. Some information on these requirements is included on the Canadian Consular Services website (http://www.voyage.gc.ca/dest/ctry/visa-en.asp). However, for definitive information you should contact the embassy or consulate of the country you plan to visit. Addresses are included in the Travel Report for each country.http://www.voyage.gc.ca/dest/ctry/visa-en.asp Consult to find out if you will require an entry visa or a work permit; it is possible you will require both.www.voyage.gc.ca International Students should contact the Office of International Student Services at Students doing an internship in France require a Convention de stage and should consult the Internship Offices Network at Interns in the USA can take part in the SWAP working holiday programme. Information on DFAIT’s website: Visas & Work Permits Managing Your Safety: Visas & Work Permits Managing Your Safety: Visas & Work Permits

17 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show November 6, 2007 :: Annual Internship Panel

18 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Please note that travel health coverage provided under McGill student health plans may not be sufficient. Travel Health Insurance should include, but is not limited to: Health insurance Supplemental health insurance Emergency health and evacuation coverage Travel insurance and Trip cancellation and interruption Students are fully responsible to ensure that they are sufficiently covered during their stay abroad. Prior to departure, students must speak to their current health insurance provider(s) to determine the supplemental coverage required. McGill students may wish to check with Travel Cuts; their plans are available to all students, offering comprehensive coverage including health, emergency assistance, and travel insurance. Insurance Managing Your Safety: Insurance Managing Your Safety: Insurance

19 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Be sure to inform yourself of: Limitations, and Restrictions Policy Exclusions Caveats If you are unsure what these and other terms and clauses mean, be sure to sure to speak with your insurance provider. Examples: “Sickness, injury or medical condition you suffer in a specific country or area for which the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade of the Canadian Government has issued a travel advisory or formal notice before your departure date” “Your participation in and/or voluntary exposure to any risk from: war or act of war, whether declared or undeclared; invasion or act of foreign enemy; declared or undeclared hostilities; civil war, riot, rebellion; revolution or insurrection; act of military power; or any service in the armed forces.” From Travel Cuts Worldwide Travel Insurance Managing Your Safety: Insurance Managing Your Safety: Insurance Insurance Plans

20 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Be sure to inform yourself of your plan’s claim procedure before leave. Always read the fine print. Be sure to carry the details of your insurance with you. Also, tell a friend or relative at home and in your host organization how to contact your insurer. When you arrive in the destination country, make a point of locating the nearest reputable clinic or hospital. The local Canadian government office will be able to provide information on clinics and hospitals. Remember to get a detailed invoice from the doctor or hospital before you leave the country. Original documents will be required to process your claim. In Case of Emergency Managing Your Safety: Insurance Managing Your Safety: Insurance

21 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Local laws and customs Managing Your Safety: Local Laws & Customs Managing Your Safety: Local Laws & Customs While you are in a foreign country, you are subject to its laws and regulations. Your Canadian citizenship offers no immunity. Be sure to familiarize yourself with local laws prior to arrival. A list of laws and customs is also available at your local Canadian government Consulate or Embassy after arrival. 1. Interaction with the Police 2. Imprisonment Abroad 3. Drugs and Travel

22 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show If stopped by the police, stay calm, do not try to rush the situation Carry photocopies of important documents with you at all times so that you may provide them to officials upon request Remember you are a guest in that country; be modest and humble Ask officer for their name and their identification number, you may need to refer to this information at a later date Ask your host organization if they can provide you with an ID card that you can carry with you to avoid problems Interactions with the Police Managing Your Safety: Local Laws & Customs Managing Your Safety: Local Laws & Customs

23 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show If you break the laws of another country, you are subject to the judicial system of that country. Being a foreigner or not knowing the local laws is not an excuse. Consular Services can neither protect you from the consequences of your actions nor override the decisions of local authorities For more information, please consult the Consular Services publication A Guide for Canadian Citizens Imprisoned Abroad: Imprisonment Managing Your Safety: Local Laws & Customs Managing Your Safety: Local Laws & Customs

24 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Be aware that some drugs that are legal in Canada are illegal in other countries. Similarly, drugs that are legal abroad might be illegal in Canada. Travellers are subject to the judicial system of the country they are in. It is their responsibility to know what the drug laws are in a foreign country before they go. Prescriptions: When you are abroad, even prescription medication can be treated as suspect, leading to delays and time-consuming investigations. Keep all medication in its original, labelled container and carry a note from your doctor explaining its use. Be sure to pack your luggage yourself. Never leave your bags unattended. Choose your traveling companions carefully. If they turn out to be carrying, using, or selling illegal drugs, you could be charged with association. Remember, do not carry parcels, gifts, or luggage for other people across the border or through customs under any circumstances. For more information, please consult the Canadian Consular Services publication Drugs and Travel – Do’s and Don’ts: Drugs and Travel Managing Your Safety: Local Laws & Customs Managing Your Safety: Local Laws & Customs

25 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show It is extremely important to be aware of your physical environment at all times. Working in another country will expose you to different environments than you are accustomed to. For example: Working in hot and humid climates may present an additional challenge as precautions against heat exhaustion and dehydration will be necessary The physical environment in many developing countries may be unfamiliar. Safety precautions we take for granted may not be enforced. Avoid being nonchalant about physical risks Car and road safety may not be as strictly enforced as in Canada. Traffic may be extremely fast, road signs may be unclear, and cars may not be equipped with safety features such as seat belts and airbags It is strongly advised that you do not drive in your host country When taking public or private transportation, make sure your decisions are based on you safety and not cost Physical Safety (1) Managing Your Safety: Avoiding Risks Managing Your Safety: Avoiding Risks

26 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Carbon Monoxide poisoning as a result of faulty propane heaters in hostels in colder climates (eg. Certain parts of Latin America, India, etc) has recently been in the news. Be sure to check the ventilation in your accommodation if you will require a heater As a safety precaution, we recommend that interns purchase a cell phone in their host country This is not an exhaustive list – At all times use your common sense and be cautious. Do not take risks you would not consider in your home country. Physical Safety (2) Managing Your Safety: Avoiding Risks Managing Your Safety: Avoiding Risks

27 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Alcohol Consuming alcohol can put you in a very vulnerable position. Someone who is inebriated may not remember how to get back to residence and they could become a prime target for criminals. If you are going out with colleagues, always STOP and ask yourself if what you are doing has potential to spin out of control Do you have a way of leaving a potentially dangerous situation or are you dependant on others? Drinking and driving may not be considered a problem in your host country You always have the right to refuse a lift with a person who has been drinking, but be prepared and don’t wait to be in that position Although cultural sensitivity is important, your safety is your number one priority Risk Taking Behaviour (1) Managing Your Safety: Avoiding Risks Managing Your Safety: Avoiding Risks

28 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Getting caught in the wrong circles As an intern in a new country you will inevitably meet new people. Unlike a brief tourism visit, an internship abroad is an opportunity to develop stronger relationships with nationals and to experience life as they do. Be wary of engaging in risk taking behaviour that some nationals may take for granted. Just because your new friends say it’s acceptable to engage in certain activities (consumption of alcohol, drugs, etc) does not mean authorities will view this behaviour favourably. If you are caught doing something illegal, you are responsible for your actions, not your friends. Risk Taking Behaviour (2) Managing Your Safety: Avoiding Risks Managing Your Safety: Avoiding Risks

29 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Always leave a copy of your Emergency Contact information with your host organization, the Arts Internship Office and family back home. Be sure to notify your host organization if you intend to travel inside the country Travelling on the cheap is not worth it. Your safety is of the utmost importance, before during and after your internship. When using taxis, settle the price before getting into the car. It is not advisable to wait until your destination to negotiate the final cost When possible order taxis from licensed companies, not off the street. Especially in the evening, you may find independent taxi drivers to be less reliable. Travelling Within Your Host Country Managing Your Safety: Avoiding Risks Managing Your Safety: Avoiding Risks

30 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show The Canadian government has a 24/7 telephone hotline that all Canadians traveling abroad can call in emergency situations. Call them collect from any country at To find out if there is a toll-free number to reach Consular emergency services from your country of destination, consult the country travel report. This information is available at: Remember to check the local code for international calls so that you have this information readily available should you need to make an emergency call. It is often the case that international toll-free numbers do not work in many developing countries. A phone card, coins, tokens, credit card, or an international long-distance fee may be required to complete the call. Emergency Situations Managing Your Safety: In Case of Emergency Managing Your Safety: In Case of Emergency

31 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Emergency Plan of Action Managing Your Safety: In Case of Emergency Managing Your Safety: In Case of Emergency Think about what you would do in case of emergency When possible order taxis from licensed companies, not off the street. Especially in the evening, you may find independent taxi drivers are not fit to drive as a result of exhaustion or alcohol. Who you would contact first, second, and third? Where is the nearest hospital and police station? Will you have access to a cell phone? Will you have cellular reception and adequate phone credit to make necessary calls? How much emergency money will you carry on you? If you had to leave the country during an emergency, what would be the first, second, third things that you would do to accomplish this?

32 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Safe Travel Tool Kit Managing Your Safety: In Case of Emergency Managing Your Safety: In Case of Emergency Keep the following on you at all times. It is also advisable to leave a copy of this information with a relative at home: A photocopy of your passport A photocopy of any visas you require A photocopy of your insurance contract, and the toll-free 24/7 emergency phone number of your insurance provider A copy of your “Emergency plan of action” as outlined in the previous slide Embassy/consulate contact information Health insurance card Emergency contact information Copy of flight details Remember to carry photocopies separately from original documents when you travel. This can help with the replacement process if these documents are lost or stolen.

33 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Remember to leave copies of this information with a relative at home, and to carry a second copy with you on your trip. Leave a copy of your emergency contact information with your host organization and the Arts Internship Office. November 6, 2007 :: Annual Internship Panel Emergency Contact Information Managing Your Safety: In Case of Emergency Managing Your Safety: In Case of Emergency

34 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Please read this form carefully before signing and submitting it to your Internship Office. November 6, 2007 :: Annual Internship Panel Student Acceptance Form Managing Your Safety: Knowing your responsibilities Managing Your Safety: Knowing your responsibilities

35 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show The needs and concerns of female travelers are unique. Female travelers may experience the religious and societal beliefs of the countries they visit differently from males. All travellers are asked to adapt to local conditions. The more that women prepare themselves for these differing attitudes, the safer their traveling experiences will be. One of your best sources of travel information is other women. Connect with them, ask for their advice. Note their recommendations on places to say and places to eat. Find out if they have friends or know of organizations you can contact at your destination. Check with the Canadian embassy or consulate for any listings of women’s expatriate clubs and organizations. Members of these groups can often be excellent sources of information. For more extensive information for female travelers, consult the Canadia Consular Services publication “Her Own Way: Advice for the woman traveler” For the Female Traveler (1) Managing Your Safety: For the Female Traveler Managing Your Safety: For the Female Traveler

36 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show For your own safety it is advisable to avoid: Wearing revealing clothing. Walking or jogging with headphones if you are alone. Wearing excessive, expensive or large jewelry. Going to bars or clubs alone. Walking alone after dark. Traveling without informing family or host organization of your plans. * Please note that this advice is also relevant for male travellers. For the Female Traveler (2) Managing Your Safety: For the Female Traveler Managing Your Safety: For the Female Traveler

37 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Managing Your Safety: For the Female Traveler Managing Your Safety: For the Female Traveler

38 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Male-female relationships vary from country to country. Be sure to inform yourself of what is appropriate behaviour in your host country. Disinhibition from travel and the opportunity to meet new people can lead to risk taking behaviour. Women particularly may be confronted with a culture of machismo and flirting It is extremely important to understand how responding to certain cues in your host country may label you Behaviour and communication that is considered harmless and appropriate in Canada may be misinterpreted It should be noted that acceptable protocols for informal male-female friend-based relationships may be different in other counties than in Canada Harassment at work: If a colleague at work is making you uncomfortable, speak to your supervisor or someone with whom you feel comfortable. In many instances, making it clear that you are not interested will be sufficient. Harassment Managing Your Safety: For the Female Traveler Managing Your Safety: For the Female Traveler

39 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show If you are assaulted: Contact the police as soon as possible and ensure that a police report is completed. If necessary, a Canadian official from the nearest Canadian government office abroad can assist you with this process. If you are unable to meet with the police immediately, record all details to jog your memory later on. If possible, have photographs taken of your injuries. Preserve evidence of the attack: don’t bathe or brush your teeth. Write down all the details you can recall about the attack and the attacker as soon as possible. Get medical attention. Even with no physical injuries, it is important to determine the risks of sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancy. If the assault was violent, do not just assume that you are physically all right; seek confirmation from a professional. Make arrangements to contact family and friends back home to reassure them as to your well- being, especially if you have missed a regular contact with them due to the assault. Assault Managing Your Safety: For the Female Traveler Managing Your Safety: For the Female Traveler

40 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show In this section Managing Your Health Managing Your Health 1. Medical Kit for Travelers 2. Immunizations and Vaccinations 3. Travel Clinics 4. Medications and Medical Records 5. Allergies and Medical Conditions 6. Helpful Information about Diet

41 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Sterile Dressing: 4X4 gauze pads / band-aids Adhesive tape / elastic bandage roll Disinfectant (such as 10% povidone-iodine or 70% alcohol) Steristrips (butterfly closures) Insect repellent Containing about 30% (up to 50%) DEET Insecticide spray for clothes, screens, camping gear and mosquito nets: Permethrin Sunscreen With wide spectrum UVA-UVB block, SPF 15 or greater, good adherence and resistance to water. Drugs – Malaria prophylaxis: for stays in malaria-endemic areas. – Skin rash, itching or insect bites: 0.5% hydrocortisone cream topical; oral antihistamine such as diphenhydramine (benadryl) – Diarrhea: -watery diarrhea without fever: loperamide (imodium), bismuth subsalicylate (pepto bismol) -severe diarrhea with mucus and /or blood in stool and /or fever: an antibiotic such as ciprofloxacin, azithromycin or rifaximin Medical Kit for Travelers –Fever/ or pain: aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen. –Nausea and motion sickness: transdermal scopolamine, dimenhydrinate (gravol), diphenhydramine or meclizine –Decongestant: pseudophedrine –Minor cuts and bruises: antibiotic ointment (1% bacitracin) (polysporin) –High-altitude sickness: acetazolamide –Water purification: iodine-containing water purification tablets or tincture of iodine –Miscellaneous: antibacterial hand sanitizer, antacids, sleep medication, cough drops, vitamins, eye drops, latex condoms and all medications normally taken on a regular basis at home. –Oral rehydratation salts: gastrolyte, etc.. –Women may also consider bringing a dose of “plan B Emergency Contraception” (commonly referred to as the “morning after pill”) Equipment thermometer, mosquito net, portable water filter, tweezers, syringes for travel to rural areas Additional Information CDC Health Information for International Travel 2008, Travelers’ Health Kit p It is advised that interns prepare a complete first aid kit to take with them during their internship. Managing Your Health Managing Your Health

42 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Immunizations & Vaccinations Managing Your Health Managing Your Health Before traveling, you must contact a travel health clinic to book an appointment for immunizations required for travel to your destination country. Based on an individual risk assessment, a health care professional can determine your need for immunizations and preventive medication and can advise you on what precautions to take to avoid disease while traveling. Make sure you have all the correct vaccinations for your host country Make an appointment at least six to eight weeks prior to departure Your vaccination record should be readily available when entering the country Be sure to ask your host organization exactly where you will be working, and whether you will be doing any field work outside of the city. This information will be important when you meet with the travel nurse.

43 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Travel Clinics McGill University Centre for Tropical Diseases Montreal General Hospital, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Room D7 153 Tel. (514) , (514) McGill Health Services Brown Building, 3600 McTavish, Suite 3300 Tel.: Managing Your Health Managing Your Health

44 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Medications and Medical Records Vaccinations Do you have a copy of your immunization booklet or an official record of your vaccines? Carrying a duplicate of your original prescription is recommended, especially when traveling to a country that is particularly sensitive about drugs. Carry an extra prescription that lists both the generic and trade names of the drug, in case your medication is lost or stolen. This is also a good idea if you wear glasses or contact lenses; having the prescription makes it easier to replace them. If you have any medical conditions or allergies, it is also a good idea to have a written translation of your condition to show as needed, i.e. when ordering food. If you don’t know anyone who speaks the language of the region where you are going, Prescription medications Do you need to bring any, such as malaria prevention medication, with you? Managing Your Health Managing Your Health

45 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Special consideration must go into your diet abroad. The following are a few suggestions regarding ensuring a proper and healthy diet. It is not an exhaustive list, but a good starting place for thinking about your diet abroad. Heat and sun exposure can lead to dehydration: Increase your daily salt intake for the first few weeks; as you acclimatize the quantity of salt in your sweat will decrease and you will need less in your diet Drink water: When buying bottled water ensure the seal on the bottled is intact Propensity for heat stroke varies with women’s menstrual cycle Women’s ability to tolerate heat is prone to change. Be conscious of this at all times Diet Managing Your Health Managing Your Health Dietary restrictions/allergies Some restrictions (such as vegetarianism) or allergies may be uncommon It is advisable to learn how to say explain your in your host country’s language Food from unreliable sources Be wary of street food, raw milk, ice cream products, undercooked meats. Avoid buffets Raw fruits and vegetables should be peeled before eating. A helpful rule is “Boil it, peel it, or don’t eat it”

46 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show In this section Managing Your Finances Managing Your Finances The key to successful management of finances abroad is successful planning. Foreign travel is often more expensive than people plan for. Plan and budget carefully. 1. Planning your Internship Budget 2. Sample Budget 3. Finance Options

47 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Don’t assume that the cost of living in a developing country is low. The cost of living, particularly in urban areas, can be as high if not more than that of Montreal. Safe and hygienic accommodation can be very costly as can transportation and food. Be sure to budget for emergencies: include a contingency fund (extra money in case of emergencies) in your budget. This should be a minimum of 10-20% of your total expected budget Planning your Internship Budget Managing Your Finances Managing Your Finances

48 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show November 6, 2007 :: Annual Internship Panel Managing Your Finances This is a sample budget designed to help you consider your expenses during your internship and to monitor your expected revenues as they relate to your expenses

49 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Money can be brought with you in the form of foreign currency, an ATM card, a credit card, traveler's cheques, or emergency dollars. It is advisable to bring funds in more than one form to reduce risk of getting stuck without money, especially upon first arrival. Be sure to inform yourself what is best in your host country. It can be helpful to obtain an amount of the local foreign currency and US dollars before departure to use for immediate necessities such as bus fare, phone calls, etc, when you first arrive. Finance Options Managing Your Finances Managing Your Finances

50 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Managing your Intercultural Effectiveness Managing Your Intercultural Effectiveness Managing Your Intercultural Effectiveness 1. Cultural Awareness 2. Language 3. Identity Issues 4. Cultural Adaptation

51 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Research your host country’s history, current political situation, living condition and cultural norms. 1. Center for Intercultural Learning Country Insights: The center has information on country’s characteristics and provides useful insights on cultural perspectives: 2. Country Profiles: The country profiles from the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade provide essential information on various countries. Cultural Awareness Managing Your Intercultural Effectiveness Managing Your Intercultural Effectiveness

52 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Learn at least a few key phrases in the language or languages with which you will have the most contact during your internship. Note that the language(s) spoken in your destination region may be different from the country’s official language, so you may need one language in the airport upon first arriving in the country, and another language during your internship. Even a modest command of the local language(s) can go a long way. There are a number of ways you can pick up some key phrases. Guide books often have a basic phrases section as the back of the book. Many guidebook companies also produce phrasebooks. You can also buy a simple translation dictionary to carry with you on your travels. If you know someone from the region, ask if they would be willing to teach you some key phrases. Finally, you can always take language courses prior to departure, especially if knowledge of the local language is required for your internship. Language Managing Your Intercultural Effectiveness Managing Your Intercultural Effectiveness

53 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show People may have different conceptions of who you are based on identity issues such (gender, religion, ethnicity, disability, etc…). This can come as a shock and can make some interns uncomfortable. For some this reality will simply entail an adjustment period during which they will understand and reconcile that people are making judgments about them based on one or more of these identities. For others, this may mean dealing with personal reactions to responses to their identity that make them uncomfortable. Everyone should have the right to safeguard their dignity and enjoy the same rights and freedom without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status. However: Remember that you are a guest and that nationals of your host country may be uncomfortable with certain parts of your identity Insisting on your right to behave in certain ways you take for granted at home may offend nationals and can have dramatic consequences that may outweigh the perceived benefits of doing what you have a “right” to do. This for instance may relate to your sexual orientation. Be aware on the perceptions of race and ethnicity of the culture that you are visiting. Identity Issues (1) Managing Your Intercultural Effectiveness Managing Your Intercultural Effectiveness

54 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Perceptions of Wealth Interns in developing countries may be perceived as wealthy and consequently treated differently. Although every intern will have to deal with this during the course of their internship, it is important to consider this prior to departure in order to prepare for this reality. There is more to the internship than your success with particular tasks: building of relationships is a key part of the process. This is a challenge in an intercultural environment, but is a tremendously rewarding exercise. It is important to be thoughtful. Consider the sources of stereotypes that you or others may hold. Getting to know one another can help to break down preconceptions. Identity Issues (2) Managing Your Intercultural Effectiveness Managing Your Intercultural Effectiveness

55 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Be aware of the historical relations between people of your race, ethnicity, religion and those of your host culture. Reflect on the following: Did your culture (or a culture that resembles yours) ever oppress your host culture? Did your host culture ever oppress your culture? Students from Canadian minority groups may feel exhilarated at being free from the racial or religious tensions at home. Others may meet familiar or new types of prejudice and have to learn new coping strategies. Few minority students conclude that these problems are sufficient reason for not going overseas. Be aware that even in seemingly liberal countries racism can be more overt. Things will also be different if you look like the people where you are going. Locals may expect you to speak their language. You may be held to different standards of behaviour than your fellow Canadians. Your relationships with people of the opposite sex (both local and Canadian) may be more closely scrutinized. Through all of this, the same basic standards of behaviour applies. Try to understand the perspective of the locals and do your best to have them understand your background. Know what you are getting into and prepare yourself accordingly. Racial, Ethnic and Religious Concerns Managing Your Intercultural Effectiveness Managing Your Intercultural Effectiveness

56 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Culture Shock is a normal experience for most interns working abroad for an extended period of time. This graph and the following slide explain the timeframe and stages of cultural adaptation and culture shock. Stages of Cultural Adaptation Managing Your Intercultural Effectiveness Managing Your Intercultural Effectiveness

57 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Prior to your departure you'll be busy with all the details of pre-trip preparation. It can be a stressful and exciting time. One minute you're excited about your trip and the next you're worried you may not get your visa in time. Often, people are so busy that they don't emotionally process their departure until they are on the plane. For many this is the first time they realize they are really going. The Honeymoon Phase occurs during the first few days or weeks in a new culture. These times are exciting, new and exotic, a sensory delight. Tourists who go overseas for two weeks may not leave the honeymoon phase. People about to spend years overseas may have very long honeymoon periods. But, soon enough, this blissful feeling wears off. Cultural shock is the emotional and/or physical upset we experience settling into a new culture. For some, culture shock is brief and hardly noticeable. For others, it can cause intense discomfort often accompanied by hyper-irritability, bitterness, resentment, homesickness and depression. Some may experience physical symptoms such as upset stomach, fatigue, insomnia and headaches. Cultural adaptation involves psychological adjustment and social adjustment and refers to the success of adapting to a new culture by participating in the local culture, learning the language, making friends, and enjoying life. Reaching this stage takes time. Do not rush it. It is helpful to observe and facilitate your progress throughout each stage by keeping a journal. Re-entry shock: Before you return home you will likely experience the same pre-travel ups and downs as you did before you left home. Upon your return it will feel like a second honeymoon. You'll be excited to see all your friends and family. However, as you realize that people are continuing to go about their daily lives and you realize that many people don't want to talk about your trip, you may find this depressing. You may feel homesick for the life and friends you left behind in your host culture. Remember that this is normal. It takes time to adjust to being home just as it did to being away. Stages of Cultural Adaptation Managing Your Intercultural Effectiveness Managing Your Intercultural Effectiveness

58 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Final Tips Stay rested, hydrated and well fed Adapting to a new environment can take a lot of energy Be thoughtful about your new surroundings Stay in touch Keep your friends and family at home in the loop Don’t forget about your host organization and friends you have made in your host country once your internship is complete

59 Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide Home End ShowNext SlideHomeEnd Show Every intern is an ambassador for McGill University, Canada, and your host country. Remember you are a guest in your host country. Don’t forget to work through the International Travel Checklist, which can be found online at: http//www.mcgill.ca/files/internships/4International_Internship_Travel_Checklist.pdf http//www.mcgill.ca/files/internships/4International_Internship_Travel_Checklist.pdf We wish you a safe and successful internship.


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