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Teen Online Reputation Survey 1. Background Purpose: To understand the attitudes, awareness and behaviors of teens and their parents regarding the importance.

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Presentation on theme: "Teen Online Reputation Survey 1. Background Purpose: To understand the attitudes, awareness and behaviors of teens and their parents regarding the importance."— Presentation transcript:

1 Teen Online Reputation Survey 1

2 Background Purpose: To understand the attitudes, awareness and behaviors of teens and their parents regarding the importance and management of their online reputation. Sample: Online panel Teenagers 13-17; N=1000; Parents of teenagers; N=1000 Geographic scope – U.S. Access the Internet at least 3 or more hours per week Methodology: 15-minute online survey for teenagers; 10-minute online survey for parents of teenagers Study dates: Conducted by Cross-Tab Marketing Services July 13-20,

3 Executive Summary Teens feel more in control of their online reputation than parents. Teens share more personal information and as a result, expose themselves to more risk. Teens acknowledge the importance of limiting access to the information they post online. Teens accept that they are primarily responsible for protecting their online reputation. Yet, less than half of teens and parents really think before posting information online. Teens believe the benefits of sharing information online outweigh the risks with the exception of location sharing. Yet, teens share their location often with family/friends (90%); with businesses (85%) and with the general public (84%). Parents are much more cautious when weighing the benefit-to-risk tradeoff. Teens share considerably more information than parents. Among teens, names (90%), photos (82%), hobbies/“things I like to do” (79%), and birthdays (76%) are the most commonly shared pieces of information. The types of information parents share most is similar to teens: names (66%), addresses (57%), photos (54%), and hobbies/ “things I like to do” (43%). 3

4 Executive Summary Teens feel less vulnerable about their personal information affecting their online reputation compared with parents. Fifty-nine percent of teens vs. 40% percent of parents strongly disagree that they have no control over online reputation Thirty-seven percent of teens vs. 53% of parents are concerned that their personal information could be used to harm them Forty-seven percent of teens vs. 68% of parents report they do everything they can to protect their online reputation Teens who don’t feel in control of their online reputation report the highest incidence of negative consequences (29%), resulting from posting personal information online. The incidence of negative consequences from posting personal information is 50% less among teens who say they do everything possible to protect their online reputation vs. those who don’t. 4

5 Executive Summary Teens and parents worry about different things. Naturally, teens and parents have different priorities and this is reflected in what they believe are the worst outcomes if their online reputations were harmed. Teens worry most about getting into college (57%), getting a future job (52%), and being embarrassed (42%). Parents worry most about fraud (54%), being embarrassed (51%), and future career (43%). Teens and parents are most concerned about the general public gaining unauthorized access to their personal data. A majority (69%) of respondents state that they would reduce sharing information online if they knew the general public could view their information posted online. Teens tend to have a lower overall level of concern regarding potential consequences of a negative online reputation. Yet, teens tend to think longer term (next 1-5 years) than parents (now to 3 years) about potential consequences. 5

6 Executive Summary Teens are doing a good job of protecting their online reputations, but admit they can do better. 9 in 10 teens and parents take steps to protect and manage their online reputations. The vast majority (80%+) of teens report no harm to themselves or others from information they have posted online. In situations where hurt or harm was self-inflicted, the most common consequences were embarrassment (72%), lost friends (40%), upset parents (32%), and cyberbullying (26%). When the damage was done to others, the most usual outcomes were embarrassment (60%), lost friends (47%), cyberbullying (44%), and upset parents (32%). 7 in 10 teens take additional action after they have experienced hurt or harm to themselves or others. Teens who fail to alter their behavior after a bad event report a higher incidence of having friends in their social network whom they’ve never met in person. 90% of teens admit they are partially (65%) or totally (25%) responsible for what happened to them when their online reputation was hurt or harmed. Over half of teens (57%) say they have never met in person “some” of their social networking friends. A small percentage (5%) say they have “a lot” of friends whom they’ve never met in person. 6

7 Executive Summary Facebook is the favorite place to post personal information. Almost all (97%) teens report using Facebook. A much smaller percentage use Twitter (32%) and Formspring (15%). Most teens check their social networking account more than once per day (67%). On average, teens use three different devices to access their social networking account. Most commonly used devices are their own home computer/laptop, a school computer, and a mobile phone. 7

8 Differences between girls and boys have implications for raising awareness and education about protecting their privacy. Boys and girls suffer different consequences from leaked information. Top consequences for girls: Lost friends, upset parents, cyberbullying Top consequences for boys: Kicked out of club or organization Girls think longer term than boys regarding the consequences of poor reputation management. Top concerns for girls: Not getting into college, not getting a job, school suspension Top concerns for boys: Lose friends, embarrassed Girls are more concerned overall about their online reputation than boys. Girls are more likely to do everything they can to protect their personal information. Girls share more information than boys except for , home address, phone numbers. Girls rely more heavily on social networking to learn how to protect their online privacy, while boys rely more on technology companies. Girls post information that is more likely to hurt others than themselves. Boys feel slightly more in control than girls. Boys are much less concerned about unauthorized access for all types of information – especially comments posted online, and details about school and friends. Boys take fewer steps to protect themselves with a few exceptions (e.g., secret accounts, using alias). Boys use fewer social networking sites and access them less often. 8 Executive Summary

9 9 Recommendations: Take Charge of Your Online Reputation

10 Protect your online reputation Think before you share Think about what you are posting (particularly suggestive photos and videos), who you are sharing the information with, and how it will reflect on you. Talk with friends about what you do and do not want shared. Ask them to remove anything you don’t want disclosed. Treat others as you would like to be treated Be civil in what you say and show on the web. Respect others’ reputations and privacy when you post anything about them (including photos). Stay vigilant Sign up for alerts. Some search engines will notify you automatically of any new mention of your name or other personal info. Occasionally, search for yourself, following the steps in “Discover what is on the Internet about you.” Periodically reassess who has access to your pages. It is okay to remove those who no longer belong. 10 Recommendations: Take Charge of Your Online Reputation

11 Cultivate your professional reputation Publish the positive Create what you want others to see. Link anything you publish to your name. Join a professional network such as LinkedIn or CareerBuilder. Put together a robust profile and make connections. Ask for recommendations from those who know your work well. Comment on career-oriented blogs and participate in online forums where you have expertise. Start a blog/website in your name, selecting a subject you are knowledgeable about. Invite comments. Consider separating professional and personal profiles Use different addresses, screen names, blogs, and websites for each profile. Don’t link your real name (or sensitive personal information such as your home address, phone numbers, or photos) with other profiles you create. Avoid cross references. Add personal information to your professional profile judiciously and only if it reflects well on that image. Look for Settings or Options to help you manage who can see your profile or photos, how people can search for you, who can comment, and how to block unwanted access. Restore your online reputation In a respectful way, ask the person who posted it to remove it or correct an error. If the person doesn’t respond or refuses to help, ask the website administrator to remove the content. If you feel a public correction is necessary, present your case simply and politely. Consider using a service such as Reputation.com to help you restore your reputation. 11 Recommendations: Take Charge of Your Online Reputation

12 Tips for managing your online reputation: General online safety tips: Follow us on Visit us onFollow us on 12 Helpful Resources

13 13 Appendix

14 Things I’ve Posted (%) Importance – keep info private (%) TEENS: Activity (importance %, posted %) 50% Things I’ve Posted (%) Importance – keep info private (%) PARENTS: Activity (importance %, posted %) 50% Teens Acknowledge the Importance of Limiting Access to the Information They Post Online 14

15 Teens Overwhelmingly Feel They Are Most Responsible for Protecting Their Online Privacy

16 16 Less than Half of Teens & Parents Give Much Thought Before Posting Information Online Think before posting information about myself that could hurt ME 55% 57% Think before posting information about others that could hurt ME 55% 59% Think before posting information about others that could hurt THEM 55%

17 The Benefits of Sharing Information Outweigh the Risks with the Exception of Location 17 ACTIVITIES Finding friends for social activities Playing online games Socializing online (chat, posts, etc.) Sharing my interestsTagging photosPosting photos Revealing activities you are participating in Sharing my current location with family/friends Sharing my current location with apps or businesses Sharing my current location with the general public Benefit is Higher Top 2 box % 56%55% 51%46%45%37%29%12%7% Risk is Higher Bottom 2 box % 13% 15%13%15%14%21%34%52%64% Benefits outweigh the risks Risks outweigh the benefits

18 Parents Are Much More Cautious When Weighing the Benefit vs. Risk of Sharing 18 ACTIVITIES Playing online games Finding friends for social activities Socializing online (chat, posts, etc.) Posting photos Sharing my current location with family/friends Sharing my interestsTagging photos Revealing activities you are participating in Sharing my current location with apps or businesses Sharing my current location with the general public Benefit is Higher Top 2 box % 15%11% 10% 8%7%5%4% Risk is Higher Bottom 2 box % 8%11%8%13%17%10%12% 23%33% Benefits outweigh the risks Q2. For each of the following please indicate on a scale of 1-5 whether you feel the benefits of the online activity outweighs the potential risk. 1= benefit completely outweighs risk; 5 = risk completely outweighs benefit Risks outweigh the benefits

19 Teens Share More Information than Parents Information Shared TeensParents Names 90%66% Photos 82%54% Hobbies / things I like to do 79%43% Birthdays 76%38% Comments I post online 67%39% addresses 66%57% Details of my school 44%na Phone numbers 31%22% Places I like to go 29%26% Details about my friends 29%13% Details about my family 20%18% Details about my workplace na10% Address 12%25% Other 1%

20 Teens Feel They Have More Control over Their Information than Parents 20 Q1 I am concerned that my personal information could be used to harm my online reputation Q2. I do everything I possibly can to protect my online reputation Q3. I don't have any control over my online reputation Compared to parents, teens believe they have more control… Which leads to lower concern… And less action…

21 Teens Who Feel They Don’t Have Control Report The Highest Number Of Negative Events Q3. I don't have any control over my online reputation 6% 29% say information I’ve posted online has hurt or embarrassed me 59% 11% say information I’ve posted online has hurt or embarrassed me > 61% increase

22 Teens Who Do Everything Possible Report Half The Incidence Of Negative Events Q2. I do everything I possibly can to protect my online reputation 47% 13% say information I’ve posted online has hurt or embarrassed me 7% 26% say information I’ve posted online has hurt or embarrassed me 50% decrease

23 Teens Worry About College & Jobs Parents Worry About Fraud & Embarrassment

24 Information that was rated very or somewhat important to protect that is posted online NamesAddresses Phone numbers addresses Details of my workplace Details about my family Details about my friends Photos Hobbies / things I like to do Birthdays Places I like to go Comments I post online Base General public 61%58%57%63%59%63%58%60%58%60%59%62% Government 29%30%34%33% 36%32%37%29%26%29%42% Teachers 24% 31%30%23%31%37%35%23%20%25%43% Future employers 27%24%25%28%22%34% 37%27%19%23%45% Law enforcement 25%28%29%28%25%32%30%31%24%23%22%34% College admissions 24%18%20%27%21%31%34%35%22%19%22%42% Friends 27%29%27%25%24%23%27%25%24% 21% Neighbours, casual friends 21%24% 21%24%23%22%26%21%18%22%23% Parents 23%22% 21%20%21%32%28%18% 22%33% Siblings 21% 20%21%18% 21%18%17%22%19% Extended family 21%15%17%21%19% 20%25%17% 22%27% Boyfriend/ girlfriend 20%23% 20%18%20%21% 19% 21%17% Others 3%1%3% 2%3%2%3%2%3% Teens Worry Most About Strangers Having Unauthorized Access

25 Information that was rated very or somewhat important to protect that is posted online NamesAddressesPhone numbers addresses Details of my workplace Details about my family Details about my friends Photos Hobbies / things I like to do Birthdays Places I like to go Comments I post online General public50%40% 46%26%44%33%49%46%47%48%54% Friends36%35%36% 45%34%35%37%35%34%31%32% My children28%31%30% 26%25%27%30%31%28% 25% Neighbours, casual friends 26%23%20%28%23%20%25%26%27% 25%30% Parents25%24% 25%19%22%21%27%23%27%21%20% Siblings25%28%22%28%23%25%22%28%27% 25%23% Extended family26%23%21%26%20%23%26%30%29% 25%26% My current employer 24%19%18%23%24%16%23%22%21%16%27%31% Future employers25%21%18%24%18%20%28%25%23%21%28%32% Government33%29% 30% 32%36%31%30%27%33% Law enforcement23%17%16%20%17%23%27%24%23%19%24%27% General public50%40% 46%26%44%33%49%46%47%48%54% Others3%2% 4%2% 3%1%2%4% Base Parents Worry Most About Strangers Having Unauthorized Access

26 Teens Worry Most About Strangers Having Unauthorized Access From whom are you most concerned about protecting the things you post online? General public 38% Parents 15% College admissions 13% Future employers 9% Friends 6% Fellow students 4% Government 3% Boyfriend/girlfriend 2% Other acquaintances 2% Extended family 2% Law enforcement 1% Siblings 1% Teachers 1% Others 4% If you knew the general public could view your information online; what would you change? I wouldn’t do anything differently than I do now 17% I would reduce what information I share online 69% I would completely stop sharing information online 10% Don’t know 4%

27 27 Parents Worry About Consequences Now Teens Think a Little Further Out

28 28 9 in 10 Teens Take Steps to Manage Their Online Reputation Steps Taken Using privacy settings on social networking accounts, , browser 76% Being more selective about what I share online 68% Being more selective about who I friend online 68% Managing/disabling location features on phone, social networking accounts, other 55% Not geotagging photos 30% Read privacy policies of the sites and services they use 29% Regularly check search results on my name 22% Using an alias on or social networking accounts 17% Making profile visible/invisible at different times of day 15% Having secret accounts 14% Asking friends not to tag my name to their photos of me 12% I chat or post comments to friends in “code” so only they know what I’m talking about 7% Other 2%

29 29 Nearly 9 in 10 Parents Take Steps to Manage Their Online Reputation Steps Taken Using privacy settings on social networking accounts, , browser 56% Being more selective about what I share online 54% Being more selective about who I friend online 49% Read privacy policies of the sites and services they use 39% Managing/disabling location features on phone, social networking accounts, other 36% Regularly check search results on my name 25% Not geotagging photos 22% Using an alias on or social networking accounts 19% Asking friends not to tag my name to their photos of me 17% Having secret accounts 11% Making profile visible/invisible at different times of day 10% I chat or post comments to friends in “code” so only they know what I’m talking about 2% Other 4%

30 8 in 10 Teens Report No Negative Consequences from Information They Have Posted Online

31 31 Most Teens Take Action to Better Protect Their Online Reputation After a Bad Event Steps Taken Be more selective about who I share information with 81% Be more selective about who I friend 72% Be more selective about where I share information 67% Pay more attention to my privacy settings 60% I’m more careful about the comments I make about others 60% I’m more careful about the language I use in my comments 58% I’m more careful about the subjects I comment about 56% Be more selective about who I share my location with 52% I make more effort to manage my social networking profiles 45% I’m more careful about which photos I tag 34% I’m more careful about my friends tagging photos of me 34% I take more time to understand the privacy policies of sites I use 25% Conduct searches on my name more frequently 17% Other 1% None of the above 1% Yes

32 32 Teens Admit They Often Fall Short in Actively Managing Their Online Reputation

33 33 Over 6 in 10 Teens Include People They Have Never Met in Their Online Social Network The majority know about ownership rights of information posted online 86% access social networking sites at least once a day or more Everyone uses Facebook and one other social networking site Average # of social networking accounts = 1.8 Strangers make up a significant number of teens’ social networking friends

34 Teens Who Don’t Change Their Behavior Are More Likely to Have “Friends” They’ve Never Met Yes No 7% say There are a lot of people I don’t know in person 18% say There are a lot of people I don’t know in person

35 Social Networking Sites Are The Primary Repository for Teens’ Personal Information NamesAddresses Phone numbers addresses Details of my school Details about my family Details about my friends Photos Hobbies / things I like to do Birthdays Places I like to go Comments I post online Base Social networking sites 95%72%89%91%94%91%94%97%94%96%94%95% Personal web site10%14%9%11%5%8%5%6%8%6%9%5% Online Photo albums 12%5%2%4% 8%9%16%5%3%8% Blogs14%3%2%9%6% 9%11%13%7%14%12% Other Sites14%32%12%18%6%8%6% 12%10%9%15% Platforms used by teens to post information online

36 NamesAddresses Phone numbers addresses Details of my workplace Details about my family Details about my friends Photos Hobbies / things I like to do Birthdays Places I like to go Comments I post online Base Social networking sites 81%51%50%66%67%72%79%85%80%85%82%88% Personal web site17%27%25%23%27%18%21%15%18%15%21%12% Online Photo albums 14%11%9%10%17% 23%30%10%9%12%9% Blogs14%8%9%11%14%11%20%12%16%7%17%23% Other Sites23%45%42%32%15% 6%8%16% 14%13% Social Networking Sites Are The Primary Repository for Parents’ Personal Information Platforms used by Parents to post information online

37 37 Teens Use an Average of Three Devices Online access from multiple devices Evenly split by genderAverage age is 16.1 years old Almost half are online more than 14 hours per week Average # of devices used = 3

38 38 Parent Sample Profile Online access from multiple devices Evenly split by genderAverage age is 45 years old Almost half are online more than 14 hours per week Average # of devices used = 2

39 39 This material is provided for informational purposes only. Microsoft makes no warranties, express or implied.


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