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Getting Along at Work An Employee Communication Presentation.

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1 Getting Along at Work An Employee Communication Presentation

2 ©SHRM Introduction "Why can't we all just get along?" This question, as many of you may remember, was asked in the worst of circumstances by a man severely beaten during an arrest. But many of us ask this question on a daily basis. In personal and family relationships, in schools and at work, interactions among people are often fraught with disagreements. In workplaces, despite our best efforts, we frequently become involved in serious and ongoing interpersonal disputes. These disagreements may involve conflicts with supervisors or with other employees. To help make our daily work life more enjoyable, it is important for all of us to understand what causes interpersonal conflicts and how to revolve them. This sample presentation is intended for presentation to all employees. It is designed to be presented by an individual who is knowledgeable in managing interpersonal conflicts and with the employer’s own policies and practices. This is a sample presentation that must be customized to match the employer’s own culture, policies and practices.

3 ©SHRM Objectives Today we will be discussing: What workplace interpersonal conflicts are, the forms they take and examples of them. Causes of workplace conflicts. Ways interpersonal conflicts may be avoided. Tips for getting along at work.

4 ©SHRM Workplace Interpersonal Conflicts Interpersonal conflicts that occur in the workplace are struggles between at least two individuals who perceive interference, lack of cooperation or lack of resources needed to perform their work. These conflicts may take the following forms: > Publicly faulting the performance of a co-worker. > Constant bickering between two employees. > Coolness or an avoidance whenever possible between employees. > Verbally abusing or making demeaning remarks to a co-worker. An important aspect of this definition is that employees may only perceive there is a conflict when, in reality, none exists.

5 ©SHRM Examples of Workplace Interpersonal Conflict Edwin thinks his supervisor, Sally, is not giving him good leads for his sales job. Instead of discussing his concern with Sally, he starts publicly criticizing her management abilities, saying she is biased and that she is causing sales revenue to fall. After a meeting with Sally that HR scheduled and attended, Edwin realized that he had an erroneous perception and that because of the economic downturn Sally had no good leads for any of her salespeople.

6 ©SHRM Examples of Workplace Interpersonal Conflict In a departmental staff meeting, Alice makes a remark that some employees are not doing their share of the work. Tony, who thinks he is a slower worker than most, is offended and stays upset for the rest of the day. He replays what Alice said over and over and talks about it to co-workers. But he never asks Alice about the remark, maintains a grudge and ignores her except when absolutely necessary. After a meeting arranged and led by their supervisor, Alice and Tony realize the conflict occurred because they both have erroneous perceptions. Alice wrongly thinks that some of her co-workers are not performing as they should when in reality all are producing at about the same and expected level. Tony erroneously thinks that Alice knows he is not performing as well as others.

7 ©SHRM Cause of Interpersonal Conflicts Some of the causes of interpersonal conflicts are: Differences and diversity among employees, potentially leading to misunderstandings based on age, race or culture, prejudices, intolerances, rumors about an individual or group. Excessive and uncontrolled competition between employees, comparison of performance ratings and bonuses, perceived inequities, fear of not receiving a promotion or losing a job. Internal conflicts within an employee such as bigotry, tendency to hold grudges, false pride, blaming others for one’s own problems. Romantic personal relationships or sexual tensions and harassment. Drug- or alcohol-related behavior.

8 ©SHRM Questions? Comments?

9 ©SHRM Ways to Avoid Interpersonal Conflicts Interpersonal conflicts arise in every workplace. You may help reduce the number and severity of these conflicts by: Treating each other with respect, dignity and fairness. Avoiding judging and criticizing each other, having hidden agendas and being close-minded to new ideas and changes. Discussing openly and trying to understand each other’s ideas and concerns and being willing to listen to each other. Working to improve your communication skills and settling differences effectively and on a timely basis.

10 ©SHRM Tips for Getting Along at Work 1.Focus on your own work and not on what others are doing unless a co-worker’s low productivity is affecting your own. 2.Avoid borrowing items from your fellow employees and monopolizing group equipment such a copier or printer. 3.Be careful about making promises that may be difficult to keep—and if you make a promise, be prepared to keep it. 4.Understand the limits of your own authority and keep within its boundaries. 5.Be cheerful, kind and encouraging to others.

11 ©SHRM Questions? Comments?

12 ©SHRM Summary Interpersonal conflicts that occur in the workplace are struggles between at least two individuals who perceive interference, lack of cooperation or lack of resources needed to perform their work. Some of the causes of interpersonal conflicts are differences between employees, excessive competition, internal personal conflicts, romantic relationships or sexual tensions, and drug- or alcohol-related behavior. Some of the ways you may help reduce the number and severity of these conflicts are by treating each other with respect, dignity and fairness, openly discussing and trying to understand each other’s ideas and concerns, and working to improve your communication skills and settling differences effectively and on a timely basis.

13 ©SHRM Summary Some tips for getting along at work are to focus on your own work, being careful about making promises that may be difficult to keep, and being cheerful, kind and encouraging to others.

14 ©SHRM Course Evaluation Please be sure to complete and leave the evaluation sheet you received with your handouts. Thank you for your attention and interest!


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