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Museums and Health: Approaches to Evaluation Dr Linda J Thomson Research Associate, UCL Museums, University College London Culture, Health and Wellbeing.

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Presentation on theme: "Museums and Health: Approaches to Evaluation Dr Linda J Thomson Research Associate, UCL Museums, University College London Culture, Health and Wellbeing."— Presentation transcript:

1 Museums and Health: Approaches to Evaluation Dr Linda J Thomson Research Associate, UCL Museums, University College London Culture, Health and Wellbeing Images © UCL Museums

2 Heritage in Hospitals In one-to-one sessions of around minutes, participants were encouraged to touch and discuss six museum objects from UCL’s Archaeology, Art, Egyptology, Geology and Zoology collections Interview questions included: What does it feel like? How does it make you feel? What do you think it is made of? Does it remind you of anything? Culture, Health and Wellbeing

3 Positive mood Negative mood Active Alert Attentive Determined Enthusiastic Excited Inspired Interested Proud Strong Afraid Ashamed Distressed Guilty Hostile Irritable Jittery Nervous Scared Upset Heritage in Hospitals Clinical scales of measurement used to evaluate psychological and subjective wellbeing before and after the handling session Culture, Health and Wellbeing PANAS - Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule (Watson, Clark & Tellegen 1988) 10 positive and 10 negative moods each rated on scale VAS - Visual Analogue Scale (EuroQol 1990) Wellness and Happiness rated on zero scale

4 Aim: To develop a flexible and generic measure of wellbeing suitable for a variety of museum and gallery activities Museums Wellbeing Measure Objectives: To produce a ‘pick and mix’ style wellbeing toolkit for different audiences To trial wellbeing toolkit prototypes in a range of museums and galleries with in- house and outreach activities To specifically target non-traditional museum visitors including older adults, mental health service users and other socially excluded groups Culture, Health and Wellbeing

5 Carried out workshops (London, Manchester & Newcastle) to obtain feedback on what was needed Conducted surveys of UK museums and galleries to find out how and why they evaluated their events and activities Reviewed existing measures of health, quality of life and individual (psychological and subjective) wellbeing Implemented findings from Heritage in Hospitals measures:  PANAS - 5 out of 10 positive words showed 70% increase in positive emotion (active, alert, enthusiastic, excited and inspired) and 5 out of 10 negative words showed 90% decrease in negative emotion (distressed, irritable, nervous, scared and upset)  VAS - Overlap between wellness and happiness scales Culture, Health and Wellbeing Museums Wellbeing Measure: Stage 1

6 Compiled pack of measures suitable for heritage activities:  Generic Wellbeing Questionnaire (based on existing scales e.g. Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing)  VAS scales for wellness and happiness (as before)  New shortened version of PANAS (5 positive and 5 negative words) based on Heritage in Hospitals research  New design for visual versions of the shortened PANAS called Museums Wellbeing Umbrellas Asked partner museums and galleries to:  Give initial thoughts and feedback on the measures  Trial the measures with different target audiences for in-house and outreach activities Culture, Health and Wellbeing Museums Wellbeing Measure: Stage 1 (continued)

7 STATEMENTS None of the time Rarely Some of the time Often All of the time I enjoyed it12345 I was interested12345 I was amazed12345 I was entertained12345 I felt happy12345 I felt healthy12345 I felt confident12345 I felt inspired12345 I felt positive12345 I felt welcome12345 I felt safe and secure12345 I talked to other people12345 I forgot about my problems Culture, Health and Wellbeing Positive MoodNegative Mood Active Alert Enthusiastic Excited Inspired Distressed Irritable Nervous Scared Upset not at alla littlemoderatelyquite a bitextremely Pack of Measures

8 Positive Outcomes Umbrella (5 emotions) Please indicate the extent to which you experienced each positive outcome shown on the ‘umbrella’ below (1 is the least amount and 5 is the greatest amount). You may find it helpful to turn the page around to read all of the words. Negative Outcomes Umbrella (5 emotions) Please indicate the extent to which you experienced each negative outcome shown on the ‘umbrella’ below (1 is the least amount and 5 is the greatest amount). You may find it helpful to turn the page around to read all of the words. Culture, Health and Wellbeing Museums Wellbeing Umbrellas… Fill in your own Umbrella (6 words) Please decide which outcomes are more important to you and write these around the edge of the ‘umbrella’ below, then indicate the extent to which you experienced each emotion shown (1 is the least amount and 5 is the greatest amount).

9 Culture, Health and Wellbeing Coloured in during arts-in-health sessions

10 Umbrellas preferred to other measures in pack as more suitable for creative activities Umbrellas appropriate as they covered everything, protected from rain and often occurred in art Needed be drawn more like umbrellas and less like spiders’ webs Could be colourful to encourage participation Could be cut out so they could be rotated easily Not all wellbeing words meaningful to everyone so useful for participants to generate their own words Simple words like ‘happy’ needed to be included (shown by research with VAS measures) Useful to have a space to write comments Culture, Health and Wellbeing Museums Wellbeing Umbrellas: Stage 1 feedback

11 Museums Wellbeing Umbrellas: Stage 2 Umbrellas re-drawn: 5 PANAS Positive or Negative words plus ‘happy’ or ‘unhappy’, and ‘Fill in Your Own Outcomes’ version Culture, Health and Wellbeing Images © UCL Museums & Public Engagement

12 Culture, Health and Wellbeing Museums Wellbeing Umbrellas: Stage 2 ‘Fill in Your Own Outcomes’ umbrellas with up to six wellbeing words or phrases around the edge, generated by participants

13 ABSORBEDAMAZEDASTOUNDEDATTENTIVECHEERFULCOMFORTABLE CONFIDENTCONTENTEDCREATIVEDETERMINEDEDUCATEDENCOURAGED ENERGETICENERGIZEDENGAGEDENLIGHTENEDENTERTAINEDFOCUSED FRIENDLYHEALTHYHOPEFULINCLUDEDINFORMEDINTERESTED JOYFULLIVELYMOTIVATEDOPTIMISTICOUTGOINGPRIVILEGED RELAXEDSATISFIEDSECURESIGIFICANTSOCIABLESTIMULATED STRONGSUPPORTEDTALKATIVETHRILLEDTRUSTEDUNDERSTOOD Culture, Health and Wellbeing Museums Wellbeing Umbrellas: Stage 2 Thematic analysis of the ‘Fill in Your Own Outcomes’ umbrella produced 42 wellbeing words that were made into flashcards and used as inspiration for later sessions

14 Based on: Connect Be active Take notice Keep learning Give Culture, Health and Wellbeing Wellbeing Umbrellas: Stage 2 Tried NEF (New Economics Foundation) 5 Ways to Wellbeing version using their colours, though too broad for most activities. Words on umbrella followed ‘I feel that I have ………......’

15 Feedback from 250+ participants, museum managers, curators, and facilitators analysed Positive word umbrella validated with 100+ participants Analysis of ‘Own Outcomes’ wellbeing words used to produce umbrellas for older and younger adults Findings being used to produce toolkit for range of audiences and different events and activities, consisting of: Museums Wellbeing Umbrellas: Stage 3 Culture, Health and Wellbeing  Generic Wellbeing Questionnaire (12 statements or 6 statements - shorter version suitable for people with dementia)  Generic Positive Word Umbrella  Generic Negative Word Umbrella  Older Adult Wellbeing Umbrella  Younger Adult Wellbeing Umbrella

16 Museums Wellbeing Umbrellas: Future ideas Culture, Health and Wellbeing Umbrellas used to set individual goals for people who are socially excluded, confused or nervous Umbrellas for people with learning difficulties or those who do not read or speak English, using facial expressions

17 Thanks to participating museums and galleries: The Beamish Museum The British Museum The Cinema Museum Dulwich Picture Gallery The Florence Nightingale Museum The Hunterian Museum Islington Museum Manchester Museums and Galleries Museum of English Rural Life Oxford University Museums The Thackray Museum The UCL Art, Grant and Petrie Museums University of Leicester with Leicester Hospital School Nottingham Museum & Art Gallery and Kettering Museum University of Worcester with Worcester Infirmary Museum Culture, Health and Wellbeing

18 Acknowledgements Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Staff and audiences of participating museums and galleries Collaborators Dr Helen J Chatterjee (Principal Investigator, Deputy Director UCL Museums and Senior Lecturer Biology) Jocelyn Dodd (University of Leicester) Guy Noble (University College Hospitals Arts Curator) Prof. Usha Menon & Dr Anne Lanceley (UCL Institute for Women’s Health) For further information: Culture, Health and Wellbeing


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