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Sex and Mating Strategy Differences in Jealousy Sarah L. Strout, Sarah E. Bush, & James D. Laird: Clark University Abstract Previous research focused on.

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Presentation on theme: "Sex and Mating Strategy Differences in Jealousy Sarah L. Strout, Sarah E. Bush, & James D. Laird: Clark University Abstract Previous research focused on."— Presentation transcript:

1 Sex and Mating Strategy Differences in Jealousy Sarah L. Strout, Sarah E. Bush, & James D. Laird: Clark University Abstract Previous research focused on sex differences in jealousy only The current study assesses sex differences and effects of mating strategy on jealousy. Results show an interaction between sex and mating strategy used. Introduction Previous research on jealousy focused on sex differences in the type of infidelity that evokes jealousy (e.g. Buss, Larsen, Westen & Semmelroth, 1992). In past studies, not all men chose sexual infidelity as most upsetting and not all women chose emotional infidelity as most upsetting. It may be that the type of mating strategy used contributes to the type of infidelity that is most upsetting. Even though women often use a long-term strategy and men use short term strategy, there are undoubtedly some of both sexes who have the alternative strategy. it makes sense to examine the effects of the type of mating strategy used on the types of infidelity that evokes jealousy. Existing literature suggests a way to measure strategy may be through mate-quality preferences (Buss & Scmitt, 1993). Discussion Suggests that sex alone is not responsible for the differences in type of infidelity most upsetting. The participants who chose emotional infidelity as most upsetting (regardless of sex) preferred their mate to be committed, faithful, educated, and successful Participants who chose sexual infidelity as most upsetting did not prefer these qualities. It seems that participants who are using a long term mating strategy (by preferring mates who are successful, educated, faithful and committed) are more upset by emotional infidelity. It may be that the inconsistencies in the results of many previous studies were due to the fact that strategy, not sex, was the key variable. References Buss, D. M., Schmitt, D. P. (1993). Sexual Strategies Theory: An evolutionary perspective on human mating. Psychological Review, 100, Buss, D. M., Larsen, R., Westen, D., & Semmelroth, J. (1992). Sex differences in jealousy: Evolution, physiology, and psychology. Psychological Science, 3, Method Participants included 47 undergraduate volunteers (18 males, 29 females) Questionnaires asked w hich characteristics participants would prefer in an ideal mate (seems to suggest a particular type of mating strategy) and the classic force choice question regarding jealousy Results The usual sex differences in both mating strategy and jealousy response were observed. Men were more likely to be upset by sexual infidelity whereas women were more likely to be upset by emotional infidelity. However the best prediction of which kind of infidelity would be most upsetting was what mating strategy the participants used. Men and women who chose emotional infidelity as most upsetting preferred their long term mate to be successful, committed, faithful and educated, which suggests a long term mating strategy. Men and women who chose sexual infidelity as most upsetting did not prefer their mate to have these qualities. This seems to suggest a short term mating strategy. Sponsored by funds from the Frances L. Hiatt School of Psychology, Clark University Successful Sexual Infidelity Most Upsetting Emotional Infidelity Most Upsetting GENDER Male Female Faithful Sexual Infidelity Most Upsetting Emotional Infidelity Most Upsetting GENDER Male Female Committed Sexual Infidelity Most Upsetting Emotional Infidelity Most Upsetting GENDER Male Female Educated Sexual Infidelity Most Upsetting Emotional Infidelity Most Upsetting GENDER Male Female


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