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Poplar School District Educational Planning Buildings Grounds Facilities For Pictures, Plans and Supporting Materials, Go To:

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Presentation on theme: "Poplar School District Educational Planning Buildings Grounds Facilities For Pictures, Plans and Supporting Materials, Go To:"— Presentation transcript:

1 Poplar School District Educational Planning Buildings Grounds Facilities For Pictures, Plans and Supporting Materials, Go To:

2 Poplar School District District Mission, Vision and Beliefs District Mission Statement The mission of Poplar Schools, in partnership with families and community, is to deliver high quality education in a safe and culturally enriched environment. District Vision Statement Poplar Schools’ students will achieve the academic proficiencies to graduate high school and succeed in a global society. District Belief Statements We believe:  In partnering with families and communities to ensure student achievement.  In providing a multi-culturally enriched environment.  In delivering a safe and non-threatening learning environment.  That all of our students deserve highly qualified and effective educators  In a rigorous and relevant education.  In nurturing student potential and development.  In valuing and safeguarding resources.

3 Poplar Elementary School VISION FOR LEARNING School Mission Statement The mission of Poplar Elementary is to educate all students in academics and the social skills necessary for success. Our staff in cooperation with families and community will teach a challenging and culturally enriched curriculum in a safe, creative environment. School Vision Statement Poplar Elementary School promotes an educational setting where children are central to the learning experience. Our staff will strive to meet the needs of our students, will honor their cultural diversity within the community, and will provide the academics for success. Belief Statements At Poplar Elementary School we believe…  Learning is a lifelong process  All students can learn  In respect for self, others and our environment

4 Poplar Middle School VISION FOR LEARNING School Mission Statement Our mission, in cooperation with family and the community, is to assure all students discover knowledge for a successful, productive future. An enthusiastic and dedicated staff will utilize a challenging curriculum in a culturally rich and safe environment.

5 Poplar High School School Mission, Vision, and Beliefs School Mission Statement The mission of Poplar High School, in cooperation with parents and community, is to develop exemplary citizens through enthusiastic and knowledgeable guidance and instruction in a culturally enriched environment. School Vision Statements The vision of Poplar High School is to create a learning environment in which:  Our communities and families will share their expertise.  Our students will excel locally as well as globally.  Our teachers and staff will educate and be members of a professional learning community.  Our tribal cultures play an important role. School Beliefs  Children are a unique and precious resource  In promoting a learning environment that is enjoyable, involves high expectations, and is relevant to our lives and culture  In providing a safe and secure environment for our staff, students, and community members  In demonstrating respect for ourselves and others, traditions and culture, and our community and environment  In supporting all areas of a healthy body, including physical, mental, emotional, social, and spiritual health

6 Historical Changes in Education Reading Writing Arithmetic Core American Values Horace Mann & Common School Movement Assimilation Social engineering Nutrition Immunization Health Vocational education Practical arts Physical education School lunch program Maria Montessori Waldorf Dewey/Progressive Movement Carnegie Units Driver’s education Safety education Foreign language Sex education Consumer Education Career Education PHS – Built 1961 PES – Built 1954 Poplar HS – 1918

7 Historical Changes in Education 1970 Special education Drug & alcohol abuse Parent education Community education Guidance counseling Individually-based learning Middle school philosophy Open Schools Community Learning Centers Magnet Schools Alternative Learning Centers 1980 Keyboarding & Computers Multicultural, gender-fair Ed Cognitive disabled Emotionally disabled English as second language Bilingual education Early childhood education Full-day kindergarten Pre-school programs After-school programs Gifted & talented program Back-to-basics movement House Plans 1990 HIV/AIDS education Gang education ADA Distance learning Internet technologies Standards-based Education Movement PHS – Recent Rebuild 1997 PMS – Built 1982 PES – Recent Addition 1987

8 Historical Changes in Education 2000 Interdisciplinary Instruction Integrated curriculum Community of learners Authentic learning & assessment Self-directed, project-based & problem- based learning Choice/vouchers movement Home-schooling Studio learning model Self-directed learning environments 2020 Virtual schools Learning communities Life-long learning facilities Networks of learning settings Distance learning centers

9 Historical Changes in Education 2030 Individual E-devices Course on line Virtual learning experiences Learning at home Community centered, co-curricular activities Graduate at 16 Health issues Different social interactions Isolation Need opportunities for connection Where are they now? Grade 12 - Class of 2014 Grade 11 – Class of 2015 Grade 10 – Class of 2016 Grade 9 – Class of 2017 Grade 8 – Class of 2018 Grade 7 – Class of 2019 Grade 6 – Class of 2020 Grade 5 – Class of 2021 Grade 4 – Class of 2022 Grade 3 – Class of 2023 Grade 2 – Class of 2024 Grade 1 – Class of 2025 Kindergarten – Class of 2026 Head Start – Classes of

10 History: CHANGING EDUCATIONAL PRACTICES 20 TH CENTURY Teaching efficiency Math/linguistic skills Teach to the class Student sharing is cheating Teaching takes place in classroom Talk teaching Tracking by “ability” levels Departmental organization EMERGING Effective learning Multiple intelligences Students engaged in multiple activities Cooperative learning Breakout groups Community-based learning Project learning Heterogeneous groupings Houses, academies

11 History: CHANGING EDUCATIONAL PRACTICES 20 TH CENTURY Uniform school paradigms Hierarchical authority structure School in relative isolation Prep for “unknown” future Grade levels taught separately Rote learning Breadth not depth Wide choices in courses, electives, and activities Parent contact sporadic & crisis driven Circumstantial school size EMERGING Multiple school paradigms Collective decision-making High community participation Prep for “unknown” future Multi-grade learning Critical thinking skills Deep learning Focused schools, fewer choices Parent contact regular and positive Intentional school size

12 History: CHANGING EDUCATIONAL PLANNING 20 TH CENTURY OVERALL PLANNING Spaces optimized Functions work in relative isolation Few strategic relationships Single function elements CLASSROOMS Isolated classrooms Anonymous on corridor Repeated sizes/shapes Hard walls Low SqFt/student Tablet arm chairs EMERGING OVERALL PLANNING Spaces flexible Functions relate to each other Many strategic relationships Multi-functioning elements CLASSROOMS Combinable classrooms Classrooms clustered Variety room sizes/shapes Permeable edges Higher SqFt/student Student workstations

13 History: CHANGING EDUCATIONAL PLANNING 20 TH CENTURY SPECIAL LEARNING AREAS Few specialized areas No SpEd or separate SpEd Isolated “Vocational” spaces TEACHERS Classroom is home base Little access to outside world LEARNING SUPPORT SPACES Central administration No/central guidance CIRCULATION Corridors Movement only EMERGING SPECIAL LEARNING AREAS Many varied support spaces Special Education in classrooms Integrated “Career-Tech” TEACHERS Planning centers are home base Phones, internet everywhere LEARNING SUPPORT SPACES Distributed leadership Distributed, proactive guidance CIRCULATION Commons, break-out spaces Social/learning experiences

14 Demographics Economy Technology Social/Cultural Diverse learners and increased community use New standards, changes in curriculum, longer school year, partnerships More computers, self-directed learning Extended-day, daycare latchkey, safety issues, alternative & magnet schools, choice & vouchers Societal Forces Impacting Education Problems & Opportunities

15 More flexibility for alternate & future uses Variety of learning settings beyond traditional self-contained classrooms New arrangements from traditional Strategies for shared community use More complex infrastructure for technology & environmental controls Problems & Opportunities Impact of Educational Trends on Facilities

16 Flexibility limited by existing space Traditional self-contained classrooms the accepted norm New arrangements hard to create Limited community use possible Facilities not accommodating new technology well Why facilities drive education Problems & Opportunities

17 Study of June 2010 – CTA Architects Engineers Immediate Concerns - Recommendations Elementary School Sewer Pipe Replacement Elementary School Rooftop Unit Replacement Middle School Front Roof Reconfiguration High School Freshman Academy Problems & Opportunities

18 Levels of Facility Modification Modernization existing facility updated structurally, educationally and environmentally, future-oriented curriculum-based factors Remodeling changes that might improve educational effectiveness ambient environmental factors Rehabilitation deferred maintenance, to restore to same condition health & safety factors

19 Advantages/Disadvantages of modernization over replacement... Advantages [+] Loyalty to building, history, symbol of community [+] Assumes economy since reusing what you already have [+] Can sell to taxpayers, economically thrifty, replacement value Disadvantages [-] Building functional obsolete with respect to educational program [-] Educational obsolescence not perceived by citizens [-] Often places economy above educational values Modernize or Replace?

20 Process Vision Plan Architecture Education++- Fit Analysis

21 Vision Plan ArchitectureEducationAnalysis VISIONING PROCESS Conduct school/community workshops - Conduct an organizational scan: identify internal and external opportunities and threats, document expectations - Develop a shared educational vision

22 Vision Plan ArchitectureEducationAnalysis VISIONING PROCESS -Though in declining enrollments, there has been an increase due to the ripple effect of oil discoveries and harvesting in North Dakota -Need to address the students prior to school -Relevance, Rigor and Relationships -Interdisciplinary academics, units and areas -Build learning around student interests, trades, health care -Need for expansion of convertible aspects of buildings allowing for change over time -Small learning communities, academies, learning pods -Mastery Learning – advance within an ungraded school – transition from time served to objectives achieved -Teachers are isolated -Parking is at a premium -Climate control is essential -Technology integration -Security visibility -Control of access to facilities

23 Vision Plan ArchitectureEducationAnalysis VISIONING PROCESS -Storage -Auditorium Seating -Electrical power is limited -Alternative Learning Center is unattractive and unappealing -Safety issues in winter to building access -Landscaping leads to vandalism -Playgrounds utilized inappropriately -Low graduation rates -Need for data to track students who have departed -Lowered parental involvement after elementary early grades -Need to improve interaction with the community college -Movement into a Project Based Learning Model

24 EXTERNAL TRENDS SOCIAL/CULTURAL POLITICAL ECONOMIC DEMOGRAPHIC INTERNAL LIMITATIONS PHYSICAL SOCIAL/CULTURAL POLITICAL ECONOMIC PLANNING STRATEGIC EDUCATIONAL FACILITY FISCAL/RESOURCE Vision

25 Education Vision Plan Architecture Education Analysis EDUCATIONAL ADEQUACY Conduct an educational needs assessment (1) Critical review of educational programs - past, present, future (2) Develop an idealized educational environment model

26 Education Educational Adequacy: Critical review of educational programs - past, present, future Learning Process Standards & accountability Program & curriculum Assessment Learning Organization Time Learning groups Social groups Staff Partnerships Learning Environment Settings Technology Resources Staff Development

27 Education Educational Adequacy: Develop an idealized educational model Learning Process Standards & accountability Program & curriculum Assessment Learning Organization Time Learning groups Social groups Staff Partnerships Learning Environment Settings Technology Resources Staff Development

28 Architecture Vision Plan Architecture EducationAnalysis FACILITY CONDITION Conduct technical building survey - Building systems performance - Environmental quality analysis - Functional use patterns analysis

29 Architecture FACILITY CONDITION Building systems performance - Mechanical - Lighting - Electrical/Power - Life-cycle costing

30 Architecture FACILITY CONDITION Environmental quality analysis - Asbestos - Air quality - Light quality

31 Architecture FACILITY CONDITION Functional use patterns analysis - Class size - configuration - use patterns - circulation - bus traffic

32 Modernization Analysis Vision Plan ArchitectureEducation Analysis ++- EDUCATIONAL ADEQUACY/ FACILITY CONDITION Assess the fit between educational model and existing buildings - Educational Adequacy - Facility Condition - Economic Feasibility

33 Improvements for Educational Adequacy - New wiring, spatial reconfiguration for new teaching practices compromises due to existing structure Improvements of Facility Condition - Healthfulness improvements: Lighting, heating, air conditioning, ventilation, renovating surfaces, window treatments, asbestos remediation - Safety improvements: ADA, site improvements, structural repairs, fireproofing, loose plaster Economic Feasibility - Long term investment value, rate initial cost depreciates over time, not initial cost - Comparable analysis of replacement versus modernization cost Modernization Analysis

34 Plan for Implementation Vision Plan Architecture Education Analysis MODERNIZATION PLAN Develop plan for implementation - modernization phasing options - financing plan - community relations plan

35 Current Facilities Educational Adequacy: Visioning and Master Planning

36 Conceptual Building Concept Conceptual building diagram with input from the futures team illustrating an ideal set of relationships between shared spaces such as library, cafeteria, gymnasium, performance and the specific needs of elementary, middle and high school learning communities. The diagram reflects the creation of small learning communities of two grade levels organized around shared project areas, teacher planning centers, counselor offices, storage and restrooms. Educational Adequacy: Visioning and Master Planning

37 Elementary SchoolMiddle SchoolHigh School 1954 – 8,350 sq. ft. Elementary Gym 1982 – 47,434 sq. ft. – Gym, Offices, Restrooms, Classrooms Built 1961 – 51,313 sq. ft – 13,973 sq. ft. – Classrooms 1983 – 7,023 sq. ft. Classrooms 1983 – 3,600 sq. ft. Classrooms 1989 – 8,704 sq. ft. Classrooms 1983 – 1,892 sq. ft. Kitchen1997 – 21,290 sq. ft. Classrooms 1987 – 18,639 sq. ft. Cafeteria & Classrooms 1984 – New Membrane on High School Roof Total Square Footage – 70,143 Total Square Footage – 47,434 Total Square Footage – 88,330 Enrollment: 374Enrollment: 235Enrollment: 202 Projected: 400Projected: 250Projected: 215

38 General Application of Organizational Concept Three alternatives were discussed based upon the following planning concepts: -60 students per grade in clusters of 4 adjacent classrooms, maintaining 1:15 teacher/student ratio. -60 future students in pre-K program focused on ages SF/PK = 7,500-8,100 SF/grade, 7,500-8,100 SF SF/K-4 = 7,500-8,100 SF/grade, 37,000-40,500 SF SF/5-8 = 9,000-9,900 SF/grade, 36,000-39,000 SF SF/9-12 = 10,500-12,000 SF/grade, 42,000-48,000 SF Total: 840 Students = 123, ,000 SF Reinforce recent plans submitted to Office of Public Instruction, based upon Larry Lezzotte Correlates. Reinforce the recently developed Title 1 School Improvement Plans submitted September 2013 Educational Adequacy: Visioning and Master Planning Of Note Enrollment: – 811 Projected Enrollment – 865

39 Elementary School Modifications Relocate reception and administration to the entry near the E Street West/ 4 th Avenue West intersection Create intentional grade groupings within building Distribute special education and counselors throughout building Educational Adequacy: Visioning and Master Planning Of Note – All classrooms are utilized

40 Educational Adequacy: Visioning and Master Planning Elementary School – Priority Project List PriorityCost 1 Replace sewer pipes in oldest part of buildingHigh$98, Replace 6 Rooftop HVAC unitsHigh$127, ECM #7: Elementary Digital ControlsHigh$156, Egress LightingHigh$16, Install Fire SprinklersHigh$337, Reconfigure heaters in bathroom toiletsMedium$12, ECM #6: Occupancy SensorsMedium$5, Mixing valves at classroom sinksMedium$7, Loop to Cafeteria from 3 rd /4 th grade sideMediumNot Estimated 10 Closer access to playground from lower grade sideMediumNot Estimated 11 Cooling for Server RoomsMediumNot Estimated

41 Educational Adequacy: Visioning and Master Planning Elementary School – Priority Project List PriorityCost 12 Re-Grounding electricalMediumNot Estimated 13 Staff toilet for kitchenLowNot Estimated 14 Relocate main entry back to centerLowNot Estimated 15 Elementary window replacementLowNot Estimated 16 Lighting ControlsLowNot Estimated

42 Middle School Modifications Create intentional grade groupings within building Distribute special education and counselors throughout building Educational Adequacy: Visioning and Master Planning Of Note – The middle school through the school improvement process, began the transition to a model school with individual and common preparation periods, thematic units, grouping of grades in specific locations and rotating exploratories.

43 Educational Adequacy: Visioning and Master Planning Middle School – Priority Project List PriorityCost 1 Re-slope entry roofHigh$106, ECM #5: Add Snow Melt ControlsHigh$2, Egress LightingHigh$11, ECM #6: Occupancy SensorsMedium$2, Reconfigure for wet labs, teacher planning, etc.MediumNot Estimated 6 Cooling for Server RoomsMediumNot Estimated 7 ECM #4: Repair Controls and Upgrade Existing Heat Recovery System Low$23,000 8 ECM #8: Middle School Domestic Hot Water ReplacementLow$26, Lighting ControlsLowNot Estimated

44 High School – Grade 9 Academy Create self contained academy for grade 9 4 classrooms and a flexible lab Educational Adequacy: Visioning and Master Planning

45 High School Modifications Relocate Library to promote public access Link Science to Family-Consumer Science Food Link Art to Family-Consumer Science Textiles Reclaim wood classroom Educational Adequacy: Visioning and Master Planning

46 High School – Priority Project List PriorityCost 1 Create Freshman AcademyHigh$121, ECM #1: High School Locker Room Make-Up Air RetrofitHigh$2, ECM #2: Variable Speed Drive on High School Gym AHUHigh$5, ECM #5: Add Snow Melt ControlsHigh$2, Egress LightingHigh$21, Replace remaining older section of roofMedium$264, ECM #3: Replace Boilers in High SchoolMedium$443, ECM #6: Occupancy SensorsMedium$5, Cooling for Server RoomsMediumNot Estimated 10 Gymnasium balcony access restrictionLowNot Estimated 11 Reconfigure Library, Computer Lab, etc.LowNot Estimated 12 Lighting ControlsLowNot Estimated

47 Educational Adequacy: Visioning and Master Planning High School – Re-Visioning Classrooms Alternative to Freshman Academy

48 Educational Adequacy: Visioning and Master Planning High School – Re-Visioning Classrooms Alternative to Freshman Academy

49 Educational Adequacy: Visioning and Master Planning High School – Re-Visioning Classrooms Alternative to Freshman Academy

50 Concerns Not Addressed Buildings are not fully ADA compliant ADA compliance is difficult without access efforts by the community Staff Housing Problems & Opportunities

51 Range of Possible Actions Do nothing Renovate existing for deferred maintenance Alterations and additions to existing to address educational issues Build new facilities Create shared community-based & virtual learning facilities Problems & Opportunities

52 Plan for Implementation Vision Plan Architecture Education Analysis Bibliography – Research Sources American Institute of Architects. (1999). Renovating Early and Middle 20 th Century Schools. Washington: American Institute of Architects. Bird, K. (2001). Creating Communities of Learning. Retrieved from CTA Architects Engineers, Hadden, P (2000). When the School Is the Community. Washington: Office of Educational Research and Improvement.

53 Plan for Implementation Vision Plan Architecture Education Analysis Maryland State Public School Construction Program (2002). Revitalization by Design. Retrieved from Miller, C (2005). Building Condition Survey Instrument. Retrieved from Popke, M (2006). Athletic Business. Retrieved from Uerling, D. (2002). Controlling Access to Public Educational Facilities. Scottsdale, AZ: Council fo Educational Facilities Planners. Veenendaal, A., Wijk, T. (1991). The Role of Educational Building in Urban Renewal. Gouda, Netherlands: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Warford, L. (1998). Community Learning Centers. Eugene, OR: Lane Community College. Weinstock, R (1978). The Graying of the Campus. Chicago: Educational Facilities Labs., Inc. Williams, J. (2002). Historic Schools Technical Assistance Consortium Final Report. Washington: National Trust for Historic Preservation.


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