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Leadership and HRO Becoming the Culture We Want.

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Presentation on theme: "Leadership and HRO Becoming the Culture We Want."— Presentation transcript:

1 Leadership and HRO Becoming the Culture We Want

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3 Effective Fire Operations and Safety Learning Organizations Effective Safety Culture Highly Reliable Performance

4 LCES

5 Human Factors

6 Leadership Development

7 A Group of People with a Common Ideology Who Try Together to Achieve Certain General Goals Movement

8 Leadership and HRO Becoming the Culture We Want HRO Organizational Culture Leadership

9 Challenges Extremely Dynamic Environment Lots of Decisions to Make Simplified Decisions Complex, Variable, Nearly Unknowable Dysfunctional Momentum

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11 Reliability Depends on Consistent Performance Avoids the: Unwanted Unanticipated Unexplainable

12 What’s HRO Look Like in Real Life?

13 HRO Principles Build Capacity More Than They Solve Problems

14 Five Lessons Learned 1. Watch for Weak Signals of Failure 2. Suspicious of Simple Interpretations 3. Focus on Ongoing Operations 4. Locate and Defer To Expertise 5. Capacity to Flex and Bounce Back

15 Effective Fire Operations and Safety Learning Organizations Effective Safety Culture Highly Reliable Performance

16 Culture A Pattern of Shared Basic Assumptions a Group Learned as it Solved Problems of External Adaptation and Internal Integration (Schein, 1993; )

17 Culture Worked Well Considered Valid Taught to New Members as Correct Way to Perceive, Think, and Feel (Schein, 1993; )

18 HRO as Part of Safety Culture A Set of Established Attitudes, Values, Beliefs, Norms, and Practices Where Safety is Revered, Promoted and Treated as an Overriding Priority Core Values and Behaviors Resulting from a Collective Commitment by Leaders and Individuals to Emphasize Safety Over Competing Goals Source: US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

19 Characteristics Informed Culture Reporting Culture Just Culture Learning Culture Flexible Culture Adapted from James Reason, “Managing Risks of Organizational Accidents”

20 Leadership An Influence Relationship Among People Who Intend Real Change that that Reflects Their Mutual Purposes

21 Four Components Leadership is Influence Leadership is a Relationship Leadership is About Change Pursuing Mutual Interest

22 How a Movement is Made and… How a Lone Nut Becomes a Leader

23 Role Modeling Be the Change You Want to See in the World

24 Leadership and HRO Keep Simple - Make Easy to Follow Nurture Early Followers Be Public – Followers See Followers

25 Leadership and HRO Be Strategic – Pursue Tipping Point If Not Lone Nut, be the 1 st Follower Courageously Follow/Show Others How

26 Changing Culture More than Formal, Punctuated Events Change Hearts & Minds of Majority HRO a Conscious Set of Values

27 The Role of Leadership Leaders Create Culture Culture Creation - Essence of Leadership Culture Mgt - Essence of Leadership (Schein, 1997)

28 The Role of Leadership A Leader Wanting to Start Evolutionary Change Must First Understand the Dynamics of Culture (Schein, 1997)

29 Cultural Facilitators Highly Applicable Directly Related to Other Concepts “Already Doing”

30 Cultural Barriers Academic Skepticism Bias for Action/Can-do Organizational ADHD

31 We Lead Others By Treating Them Individually Stimulating Them Intellectually Inspiring and Motivating Them Building Trust and Commitment

32 Characteristics Informed Culture Reporting Culture Just Culture Learning Culture Flexible Culture Adopted from James Reason, “Managing Risks of Organizational Accidents”

33 Informed Culture Understand Variables Affecting Whole System Human Reluctance to Simplify Technical Sensitivity to Operations Organizational Environmental (Hopkins, 2002)

34 In Reporting Culture: Employees Encouraged to Report Assured Information Will be Acted On Preoccupation with (Preventing) Failure (Hopkins, 2002)

35 Learning Culture In Short, The Organization is Able to Learn and Change From its Prior Mistakes Commitment to Resilience (Hopkins, 2002)

36 Just Culture “ An atmosphere of trust in which people are encouraged (even rewarded) for providing safety- related information, but in which they are also clear about where the line must be drawn between acceptable and unacceptable behavior” Sensitivity to Operations Commitment to Resilience (Hopkins, 2002)

37 Flexible Culture Adapt to Changing Demands Reconfigure in Face of High Tempo Ops Shift Authority Structure Commitment to Resilience Deference to Expertise

38 Toward a New Philosophy Accept That Error And Failure Are Expected And Will Happen

39 Contact Information Michael T. DeGrosky


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