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Basic FPGA Configuration Part 1. Welcome If you are new to FPGA design, this module will help you understand the configuration process These configuration.

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Presentation on theme: "Basic FPGA Configuration Part 1. Welcome If you are new to FPGA design, this module will help you understand the configuration process These configuration."— Presentation transcript:

1 Basic FPGA Configuration Part 1

2 Welcome If you are new to FPGA design, this module will help you understand the configuration process These configuration techniques apply to all of Xilinx’s newest FPGAs, including Spartan-6 and Virtex-6

3 After completing this module, you will able to: Describe the purpose of each of the FPGA configuration pins Explain the differences between the available configuration schemes Choose an appropriate FPGA configuration scheme for your application

4 Introduction What is configuration? –Process for loading configuration data into the FPGA Configuration Data Source Configuration Data Source FPGA Control Logic (Optional) Control Logic (Optional)

5 Introduction When does configuration happen? –On power up –On demand Why do FPGAs need to be configured? –FPGA configuration memory is volatile –Configuration data is stored in a PROM or other external data source What do you need to know about FPGA configuration? –What happens during configuration –How to set up various configuration modes and daisy chains

6 FPGA FPGA Configuration Methods Xilinx Cables : JTAG Slave Serial Slave SelectMAP Microprocessor : JTAG Slave Serial Slave SelectMAP Xilinx PROMs : Slave/Master Serial Slave/Master SelectMAP Commodity Flash : Slave SelectMAP SPI* BPI* *SPI and BPI support is available in Spartan™-6, Virtex™-6, and some older FPGA families

7 FPGA Configuration Process To understand the configuration process, you need to know about… –Configuration pins – define the configuration mode Some configuration pins are inputs (active switches), while others are outputs (status indicators) –Configuration modes – is the current configuration scheme FPGA designs can support multiple configuration modes  This will require the user to build additional control logic to drive the configuration pins  Be careful, many debugging issues involve multiple configuration modes being used at one time

8 Specific pins on the FPGA are used during configuration Some pins act differently depending on the configuration mode –Example: CCLK is an output in some modes and an input in others Some pins are only used in specific configuration modes Configuration Pins

9 Mode pins –(3) Input pin(s) that select which configuration mode is being used PROGRAM_B –Input that initiates configuration –Active Low CCLK (configuration clock) –Input or output (depending on configuration mode) –Frequency up to 100 MHz (dependent on the FPGA, see configuration user guide) INIT_B –Open-drain bi-directional pin –Error and power stabilization flag –Active Low DONE –Open-drain bi-directional pin –Indicates completion of configuration process Configuration Pins

10 DIN –Serial input for configuration data DOUT –Output to the next device in a daisy chain –Used in daisy chains only …other pins are used for specific configuration modes Note that some configuration pins are dual purpose –They become user I/O after configuration is complete This is often prohibited by the user Configuration Pins

11 Serial (one data line) –JTAG Primarily for debugging and prototyping, recommended for all applications, external control logic provided by download cable and JTAG chain –Master Serial Control logic is a part of the FPGA, uses serial Flash (such as Platform Flash PROM) –Slave Serial External control logic is necessary, built by user –SPI (Serial Peripheral Interface) Control logic in FPGA, uses an industry-standard SPI Flash PROM, usually used in embedded applications Parallel (8-bit or 16-bit data lines) –Master SelectMAP Control logic is a part of the FPGA, uses parallel Flash (such as Platform Flash) –Slave SelectMAP External control logic necessary, built by user –BPI (Byte-Wide Peripheral Interface) Control logic is a part of the FPGA, uses an industry-standard NOR Flash, usually used in embedded applications Many Configuration Modes

12 TCK is driven by your Xilinx programming cable The bitstream is stored on your computer and is downloaded via the ISE™ software iMPACT utility and a Xilinx programming cable –Primarily used for debugging Control signals are in parallel Unique programs are shifted into the appropriate device FPGA ISE (iMPACT) + Cable ISE (iMPACT) + Cable TDI FPGA TCK TMS TDO JTAG Configuration Mode

13 FPGA provides all control logic –All mode pins are tied Low –Slave serial mode requires external control logic Master Serial mode –FPGA drives configuration clock (CCLK) as an output –Data is loaded 1 bit per CCLK –Used when data is stored in a serial PROM (usually a Xilinx Platform Flash PROM) –Slowest configuration mode, but the easiest to debug Xilinx Platform Flash PROM Xilinx Platform Flash PROM FPGA CCLK Data Master Serial Configuration Mode

14 External control logic required to generate CCLK –Microprocessor or microcontroller –Xilinx serial download cable –Another FPGA could be used to build the control logic –Daisy chains are often used in this mode Data is loaded 1 bit per CCLK All mode pins are tied High Serial Data Serial Data FPGA Control Logic Control Logic Data CCLK Slave Serial Configuration Mode

15 FPGA provides all control logic Sometimes called Master Parallel mode –FPGA drives address bus –Data is loaded 1 byte per address Data internally serialized FPGA generates 8 CCLKs per byte Usually targets Xilinx Platform Flash XL or another vendors Platform Flash PROM –The Xilinx Platform Flash XL also works in BPI mode and is a popular memory resource for Virtex-5 and Virtex-6 This enable faster configuration times Byte-Wide Data Source Byte-Wide Data Source FPGA CCLK Data Master SelectMAP Mode

16 External control logic required (microprocessor or microcontroller, for example) Ready/Busy handshaking Data presented 1 byte at a time –Virtex-5 and Virtex-6 support x8, x16, and x32 –Spartan-6 supports x8 and x16 Asynchronous Peripheral –Control logic provides a Write strobe Triggers FPGA to generate 8 CCLK pulses Can target Xilinx Synchronous Peripheral –CCLK provided by control logic (8 pulses per data byte) Platform Flash XL –This would not require external control logic Byte-Wide Data Byte-Wide Data FPGA Control Logic Control Logic Data Ready/Busy Control Signals Slave SelectMAP Mode

17 FPGA configures itself from an attached industry-standard SPI serial Flash PROM –FPGA issues a command to Flash and it responds with the data –Can be used in multi-boot applications where multiple bitstreams can be loaded by the FPGA Data is loaded 1 bit per CCLK (slow) There are no standards for the commands –Commands are vendor specific –Vendor Select (VS) pins tell the FPGA which commands to issue –Spartan™-6 supports x2 and x4 modes –See Data Sheet or Configuration User Guide for list of supported vendors –Excellent choice for embedded applications SPI Flash PROM SPI Flash PROM FPGA Data Command CCLK Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) Mode

18 FPGA issues an address to a BPI Flash, which responds with the data –Uses standard parallel NOR Flash interface –No clock is needed because the FPGA contains the control logic Usually used in embedded applications –Flash is easily used as addressable memory with address and data buses –Supported for Virtex™-5, Virtex-6, Spartan™-3E, and Spartan-6 FPGAs Xilinx Platform Flash XL is a 128 Mb parallel NOR and works in BPI and SelectMAP modes –Spartan-6 BPI mode is shared with SelectMAP mode BPI NOR Flash BPI NOR Flash FPGA Data Addr[26:0] Byte-Wide Peripheral Interface (BPI) Mode

19 Field programmable gate arrays are usually configured on power up from an external data source SPI and BPI are the simplest configuration modes and take the least effort to debug, because the control logic is already built Slave configuration modes require you to build the external control circuitry JTAG access enables much easier testing and debugging of your prototype and while your system is in production Summary

20 Where Can I Learn More? Configuration User Guides (from the ISE tools) –Help  Xilinx on the Web  (select a device family)  FPGA User Guides Virtex-6 FPGA Configuration User Guide, UG360 Spartan-6 FPGA Configuration User Guide, UG380 Virtex-5 FPGA Configuration User Guide, UG191 (older Spartan families), UG332 Platform Flash XL Configuration and Storage Device User Guide, UG438 Software Manuals (iMPACT, PromGEN, and BitGen) –Help  Software Manuals  Command Line Tool User Guide Platform Cable USB II –Data Sheet, DS593 –USB Cable Installation Guide, UG344 Troubleshooting BPI Programming Tutorial (evaluation kit page) –Help  Xilinx on the Web  Support & Services  Products & Services  Boards and Kits  (select a board)  Documentation BPI programming tutorial for ML605 and SP601 demo boards

21 Where Can I Learn More? Check out the Configuration Problem Solver –www.xilinx.com/support/troubleshoot.htm –This utility provides a step-by-step debugging guide for all configuration schemes Xilinx Education Services courses –www.xilinx.com/training Xilinx tools and architecture courses Hardware description language courses Basic FPGA architecture, Basic HDL Coding Techniques, and other Videos!

22 Basic FPGA Configuration Part 2

23 Welcome If you are new to FPGA design, this module will help you understand the configuration process and some more advanced features of configuration These configuration techniques apply to all of Xilinx’s newest FPGAs, including Spartan-6 and Virtex-6

24 After completing this module, you will able to: Answer some Frequently Asked Questions Describe the prototyping hardware currently available Explain the role of each phase of the configuration sequence Connect multiple FPGAs into a configuration daisy chain Describe the features of the Xilinx Platform Flash and Platform Flash XL

25 Should my FPGA load its configuration data from an external memory or should a processor or microcontroller download the configuration data? –The benefit of slave modes is that the bitstream can be stored pretty much anywhere in your hardware system –Control logic can allow for in-system delivery of FPGA design updates –Additional components will have to be purchased –Debugging your custom control circuitry can be challenging –Master configuration schemes already have the control logic built inside of the FPGA, so debugging is minimal –Always include a JTAG configuration path for easy debugging Question

26 Should my system use a single FPGA or multiple FPGAs? –Most applications use a single FPGA –But some applications require multiple FPGAs for increased logic density or I/O –Multiple FPGA systems should have a single configuration data source and use a daisy chain This reduces cost and simplifies programming and logistics All of the configuration schemes support daisy chains Question

27 Which is the simplest configuration scheme to debug? –Master Serial, BPI, and SPI modes are probably the easiest to use Using any master configuration mode will be easy to debug because you did not have to build the external control logic –Master modes use the fewest pins Verses parallel modes which are the fastest, but have the most pins to debug SPI and BPI modes may also be least expensive Question

28 Should I choose the lowest-cost configuration solution? Do you already have a spare, non-volatile memory component in your system? –The bitstream can be stored in system memory, on a hard drive, or downloaded remotely over a network connection Is there a way to consolidate the non-volatile memory required in your application? –Can the bitstream of your FPGA be stored with any processor code for your application (such as an embedded application)? Can you use the SPI or BPI configuration schemes? –Because these devices have common footprints and multiple suppliers, they may have lower pricing due to highly competitive markets Question

29 Is the fastest possible configuration time the more important consideration? –Parallel configuration schemes are inherently faster than serial modes –Configuring a single FPGA is inherently faster than configuring multiple FPGAs in a daisy chain –In master modes, the configuration clock frequency of the FPGA can be increased using the ConfigRate bitstream option The maximum speed depends on the read specifications for the non-volatile memory you have chosen A faster memory can allow for faster configuration –The clock made by the FPGA varies by process. The fastest configuration rate depends on this clock, so check your data sheet If an external clock exists in your application, you can configure in slave mode while using attached non-volatile memory Question

30 Will the FPGA be loaded with a single configuration image or multiple images? Most applications use one image and the FPGA is configured when power is turned on Some applications re-load the FPGA multiple times, while the system is operating, with different bitstreams for different functions (called MultiBoot) –For example, the FPGA can be loaded with one bitstream to implement a power on self-test, followed by a second with the final application –In test equipment applications, the FPGA is loaded with different bitstreams to execute hardware-assisted tests. With this method, one small FPGA can implement the equivalent functionality of a larger ASIC or FPGA The JTAG and slave modes easily support reloading the FPGA with multiple images –However, reloading multiple images is also possible in Master schemes with the newest FPGAs using the MultiBoot feature Question

31 What I/O voltages are required in the end application? The chosen FPGA configuration mode places some constraints on the FPGA application—specifically the I/O voltage allowed on the configuration banks of the FPGA –SPI and BPI modes leverage third-party Flash memory components that are usually 3.3V-only devices –This requires that the I/O voltage on the banks attached to the memory also be 3.3V –If a voltage other than 3.3V is required (this is the case with Virtex-6), consider using a Xilinx Platform Flash PROM –Numonyx, Spansion, and Winbond are considering producing a flash memory that is compatible with Virtex-6 Question

32 Should the FPGAs I/O pins be pulled High via resistors during configuration? –Some of the FPGA pins used during configuration have dedicated pull-up resistors during configuration –The majority of user I/O pins have optional pull-up resistors Why enable the pull-up resistors during configuration? –Floating signal levels are a problem in CMOS logic systems –The internal pull-up resistors generate a logic High level on each pin –Similarly, an individual pin can be pull-down using an appropriately-sized external pull-down resistor Why disable pull-up resistors during configuration? –In hot-swap or hot-insertion applications, the pull-up resistors provide a potential current path to the I/O power rail –Turning off the pull-up resistors disables this potential path –However, external pull-up or pull-down resistors are then required on each individual I/O pin Question

33 Does the application target a specific FPGA density or should it support migrating to other FPGA densities in the same package footprint? The package footprint and pinouts for some Xilinx families are designed to allow migration among different densities within a specific family –This may require a larger memory device –For example, three different Spartan™-6 LX FPGAs support the identical package footprint when using the 256-ball fine-pitch thin ball grid array package FT(G)256 –The smallest device, the XC6SLX4, requires approximately 2.5 Mbits for configuration. The largest of these devices, the XC6SLX150T, requires approximately 32.1 Mbits for configuration –To support design migration among device densities, allow sufficient configuration memory to cover the largest device in the targeted package (remember to include the size of any software) Question

34 File Generation BitGen –Used to generate Xilinx FPGA bitstreams (.BIT) for configuration –Requires a native circuit design (.NCD), which is made after place and route has been successfully completed –NCD defines the internal logic and interconnections for your FPGA design iMPACT –GUI tool used to generate PROM Files –Used to configure FPGAs in-system, directly from a host-computer with a Xilinx download cable

35 File Generation PROMGen –Used to generate PROM Files –Formats a bitstream file (.BIT) into a PROM format file –Supports MCS-86 (Intel), EXORMAX (Motorola), and TEKHEX (Tektronix) –Can also generate a binary or hexadecimal file

36 Prototyping Solutions Platform Cable USB –Low-cost JTAG/Slave Serial ISP cable connects to USB port –Configures Xilinx FPGAs –Programs Xilinx CPLDs and PROMs Platform Cable USB II –Low-cost JTAG/Slave Serial ISP cable connects to USB port –Configures Xilinx FPGAs –Programs Xilinx CPLDs and PROMs –Programs SPI flash memory devices Parallel Cable IV –Low-cost JTAG/SlaveSerial cable connects to PC parallel port –Configures Xilinx FPGAs –Programs Xilinx CPLDs and PROMs Note: Xilinx hardware solutions are not recommended for production programming

37 Configuration Sequence Steps are the same for all devices and modes 1) Device Power-Up –This timing diagram shows the first 3 steps of configuration –Check that your system powers-up the FPGA quickly enough –INIT_B is a bi-directional open-drain pin (external pull-up is required)

38 Configuration Sequence 2) Clear Configuration Memory –Configuration memory is cleared any time the device is powered up or after the PROGRAM_B pin is pulsed Low There is a minimum length of time PROGRAM_B must be low Can be held low as long as you want After it is released the configuration memory is cleared twice –During this time I/Os are placed in a High-Z state –INIT_B is internally driven Low during initialization, then released after Tpor If INIT_B pin is held Low externally, the device waits at this point in the initialization process until the pin is released 3) Samples Mode Pin s –This is done when INIT_B goes HIGH –Then CCLK starts running

39 Configuration Sequence 4) Synchronization –For BPI-Up, BPI-Down, Slave SelectMAP, and Master SelectMAP modes, the bus width must be first detected –A special 32-bit synchronization word (0xAA995566) is sent to the configuration logic This alerts to upcoming configuration data and aligns the configuration data with the internal configuration logic 5) Check Device ID –ID check must pass before the configuration data frames can be loaded This prevents configuration with a bitstream that is formatted for a different device If an ID error occurs during configuration, the device attempts to do a fallback reconfiguration 6) CRC (Cyclic Redundancy Check) –After the configuration data is loaded the configuration bitstream can issue a Check CRC instruction to the device, followed by an expected CRC value –If the value does not match, the device pulls INIT_B Low and aborts configuration The CRC check is included in the configuration bitstream by default, but can be disabled Intended to catch errors in transmitting the configuration bitstream

40 Configuration Sequence 7) Start-Up –The startup sequence is controlled by an 8-phase sequential state machine –The startup sequencer performs the following tasks (user selectable) Wait for DCMs to Lock (optional) Wait for DCI to Match (optional) Negate Global 3-state (GTS) (which activates I/O) Release DONE pin (open-drain output requiring an external pull-up) Assert Global Write Enable (GWE) (allows RAMs and FFs to change state) Assert End of Startup (EOS)  Note that last 4 steps are default

41 What is a Daisy Chain? Multiple FPGAs connected in series for configuration –Allows configuration of many devices from a single data source –Minimizes the board traces necessary In our example, the first device in this serial daisy chain can be in any configuration mode, but we chose the Master Serial mode All other devices must be in Slave Serial mode Note that additional configuration modes support daisy chains –Refer to the Configuration User Guide for your FPGA to learn about other types of daisy chains

42 First device is in Master Serial (000), second is in Slave Serial (111) Connect all PROGRAM and CCLK pins together Connect each DOUT to the DIN of the next device Connecting INIT and DONE pins is recommended What is a Daisy Chain?

43 First device is in Master Serial (01), second is in Slave Serial (11) Connect all PROGRAM and CCLK pins together Connect each DOUT to the DIN of the next device Connecting INIT and DONE pins is recommended Creating a Serial Daisy Chain (Spartan-6)

44 Creating a Daisy Chain Connect PROGRAM pins –Required so that all FPGAs will all reprogram together Connect CCLK pins –Required so that all FPGAs are synchronized with each other and with the data stream Connect each DOUT to the DIN of the next device –Required to allow each FPGA to receive the data stream Connect INIT pins –Creating a single error flag is recommended Connect DONE pins –Creating a single status flag is recommended –Connect DONE to the CE input of your PROM

45 How Does a Daisy Chain Work? A synchronization word is passed to each device in the chain The first FPGA in the chain is configured first –Keeps DOUT High until its configuration memory is full –Then data is passed to the next device in the chain The startup sequence occurs after all devices are configured

46 In-system programmable configuration PROMs –Ideal for smaller density FPGAs 8, 16, and 32 Mb of in-system programmable flash storage Multiple devices can be cascaded to configure larger FPGAs or multiple FPGAs daisy chained together –Supports Master Serial, Slave Serial, Master SelectMAP, and Slave SelectMAP configuration modes –In-system programmable via JTAG –Data compression allows the user to target a smaller density Platform Flash –In Slave Serial mode the flash can generate its own configuration clock –1.8V supply voltage XCFxxP Platform Flash Features

47 Design revisioning –Supports up to 4 unique design revisions Customer example: safe updates –Rev0 is the golden image –Rev1 and Rev2 are new images –If Rev1 or Rev2 fail, Rev0 can be loaded automatically Customer example: system tests –Rev0 is the board test –Rev1 is the production version XCFxxP Platform Flash Features REV0 REV2 REV3 REV_SEL[1:0] = 01 EN_EXT_SEL= 0 REV1

48 High Speed Storage Device (800 Mb/sec, 50 MHz w/16-bits) –Ideal for high density FPGAs, 128 Mb of in-system programmable flash storage –Supports 16 bit data bus Configuring at 30 MHz with a 16-bit data bus, a Virtex-6 LX130T device requires ~85 ms to receive its 43 Mb of configuration data Ideal for PCI Express and other high performance applications –Optimized for high-performance and ease of use Standard NOR-Flash Interface for access to software code or data Storage –Supports MultiBoot bitstream for design revision storage –Can store data or processor code Platform Flash XL Features Standard NOR Flash Interface Master SelectMAP Mode

49 Indirect programming of the flash can be done with a single cable –Configuration of the FPGA with the Platform Flash XL can be done with Master BPI-Up, Slave-SelectMAP, or Master-SelectMAP modes Master-SelectMAP uses an internal configuration clock of 3 MHz Slave-SelectMAP is the fastest Special control of the power supply sequence or delay of the configuration process can be required to ensure power-on readiness of the Platform Flash XL before the FPGA BPI address sequence Platform Flash XL Features Indirect programming of the Platform Flash XL

50 MultiBoot is used for both fallback and warm boot reconfiguration –Fallback reconfiguration occurs when an error is detected during configuration –When fallback or IPROG occurs, a pulse resets the entire configuration logic –This reset pulse pulls INIT_B and DONE Low, and restarts the configuration process –The FPGA drives new values on the two dual-mode pins RS[1:0] (Revision Select) –When a configuration error is detected, the configuration logic generates an internal reset pulse and actively drives RS[1:0] to 00 to load the fallback (safe) bitstream –Warm boot (IPROG) reconfiguration is the same except the WBSTAR register assigns RS This is used to load a new bitstream at any time without powering down Virtex-6 MultiBoot BPI Flash Address Space for MultiBoot Fallback Reconfiguration Usage for BPI * Initial Bitstream Selected as RS[01]

51 Spartan-6 MultiBoot is different from Virtex-6 –Spartan-6 supports reconfiguration for fallback and warm boot applications, but cannot be activated by external pins (no RS inputs) –With Spartan-6 the FPGA application triggers a MultiBoot operation, causing the FPGA to reconfigure from a different configuration bitstream –There are three images for MultiBoot configuration. The first image is the Header. This small bitstream contains the syncword, sets the addresses for the next bitstream as well as the fallback or golden bitstream The second image is the MultiBoot Bitstream. This is the bitstream that the user plans to configure first The third image is the fallback or golden bitstream. This bitstream is known to be “safe” should an error occur consistently during configuration Spartan-6 MultiBoot MultiBoot Logic

52 Summary Master Serial, Master SelectMAP, SPI, and BPI are the simplest configuration modes and take the least effort to debug Slave configuration modes usually takes the most effort to debug JTAG access enables much easier testing and debugging of prototype. Multiple FPGAs can be connected to form a configuration daisy chain The Platform Flash XL is designed to support Xilinx’s largest FPGAs and is compatible with Virtex-6

53 Where Can I Learn More? Configuration User Guides (from the ISE tools) –Help  Xilinx on the Web  (select a device family)  FPGA User Guides Virtex-6 FPGA Configuration User Guide, UG360 Spartan-6 FPGA Configuration User Guide, UG380 Virtex-5 FPGA Configuration User Guide, UG191 Platform Flash XL Configuration and Storage Device User Guide, UG438 Software Manuals (iMPACT, PromGEN, and BitGen) –Help  Software Manuals  Command Line Tool User Guide Platform Cable USB II –Data Sheet, DS593 –USB Cable Installation Guide, UG344 Troubleshooting BPI Programming Tutorial (evaluation kit page) –Help  Xilinx on the Web  Support & Services  Products & Services  Boards and Kits  (select a board)  Documentation BPI programming tutorial for ML605 and SP601 demo boards

54 Where Can I Learn More? Check out the Configuration Problem Solver –http://www.xilinx.com/support/troubleshoot.htm –This utility provides a step-by-step debugging guide for all configuration schemes Xilinx Education Services courses –www.xilinx.com/training Xilinx tools and architecture courses Hardware description language courses Basic FPGA architecture, Basic HDL Coding Techniques, and other Free Videos!

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