Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Shoreline Master Program Update. Shoreline Management Act approved by voters in the early 1970’s to: – Encourage water-dependent uses – Protect shoreline.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Shoreline Master Program Update. Shoreline Management Act approved by voters in the early 1970’s to: – Encourage water-dependent uses – Protect shoreline."— Presentation transcript:

1 Shoreline Master Program Update

2 Shoreline Management Act approved by voters in the early 1970’s to: – Encourage water-dependent uses – Protect shoreline natural resources – Promote public access Cities and counties must adopt local ‘Shoreline Master Programs’ – Consistent with statute and administrative rules New shoreline guidelines adopted in 2003 – Establishes scope for SMP update

3 Thurston Region SMP – First adopted in 1976 – Multiple updates Special Area Management Plans – Percival Creek – Urban Waterfront

4 2007 – State funding for joint planning effort for Olympia, Lacey, Tumwater – Coordinated by Thurston Regional Planning Council (TRPC) – Technical advisory group 2007 – 2009 activities – Inventory and characterization – Shoreline designations – Cumulative impact analysis – Develop restoration and public access plans – Public outreach – Develop draft policies and regulations Cities and counties must update their Shoreline Master Programs

5

6 July 2009 – Model SMP handed over to cities – Serves as a starting point for Olympia’s update – Will be refined to address issues that are unique to Olympia September 2010 – Goal for City Council adoption

7 January – February : Public outreach March – April: ‘Rewrite’ Planning Commission meetings – Subcommittee meetings: March – April – Planning Commission meetings: April 19, May 3, May 17 May: Release draft for public comment – Public Workshops June: Planning Commission public hearing(s) July – August: Revisions September: City Council action – Submit SMP to Ecology

8 Citizens, tribe, public agencies, interest groups City staff Planning Commission – Subcommittee City Council Department of Ecology – Partner with City during update process – Review SMP after Council action – Final approval

9 No net loss Restoration Sea Level Rise Building heights Bulkheads Park and trail uses Nonconforming uses/structures Integration of Percival and Urban Waterfront Plans Integration with Comprehensive Plan update Critical Area Regulations within shorelines Coordination with other jurisdictions Tribal interests Port uses

10 Purpose – Encourage uses that protect or enhance the current or desired character of the shoreline. Ecology established new designations: – Aquatic – Natural – Urban Conservancy – Shoreline Residential – High Intensity TRPC-proposed designations…..

11 Aquatic – Waterward of ordinary high water mark – Protect, restore, and manage aquatic areas

12 Natural – NRCA, federal, or state wildlife refuge, or unique environment retaining high quality and high value habitat – Protect areas relatively free of human influence – Permit only low intensity uses

13 Urban Conservancy – Zoned for open space or has a high proportion of undevelopable lands such as wetlands, steep slopes or large parks – Protect and restore ecological functions in urban/developed settings while allowing compatible uses

14 Residential – Zoned for residential uses and land is currently predominantly residential or developable land – Accommodate residential development; provide for public access and recreational uses

15 High Intensity – Zoned for mixed use, commercial or industrial uses, and land is currently developed, developable, or redevelopable – Provide for high intensity water- oriented uses while protecting existing ecological functions

16 Shoreline characterized by a mix of residential, commercial, and industrial uses Some intact riparian systems

17 Existing: Rural Proposed: Urban Conservancy County to determine designation

18 Existing: Rural Proposed: High Intensity

19 Existing: Urban Proposed: High Intensity

20 Existing: Urban Proposed: High Intensity

21 Existing: Urban Proposed: High Intensity

22 Existing: Urban Proposed: Shoreline Residential

23 Existing: Urban Proposed: Shoreline Residential

24 Existing: Conservancy Proposed: Urban Conservancy

25 Existing: Conservancy Proposed: Natural

26 Characterized by intact wetlands and riparian areas, steep slopes, public parks Some highly modified shoreline

27 Existing: Conservancy Proposed: Urban Conservancy

28 Existing: Conservancy Proposed: Urban Conservancy

29 Existing: Conservancy Proposed: High Intensity

30 Existing: Conservancy Proposed: Urban Conservancy

31 Existing: Conservancy Proposed: Urban Conservancy

32 Existing: Conservancy Proposed: High Intensity Percival Cove

33 Existing: Conservancy Proposed: Urban Conservancy Percival Cove

34 TRPC Proposal: – Budd Inlet Residential Setbacks Existing – 20’ Proposed – 25’ – Capitol Lake Residential Setbacks Existing - 100’ Proposed – High Intensity – 15’ – Urban Conservancy – 100’ – Budd Inlet Commercial/Industrial Setbacks Existing – based on zoning Proposed – 0’ if water dependent, 15’ if water related or non-water oriented

35 TRPC Proposal: – Residential Capped at 35 feet – Commercial/Industrial 42’ within first 100’ 70’ within remainder City Proposal – Not yet developed. Shoreline Jurisdiction 42’ height 70’ height

36 SMP must provide for management of critical areas TRPC Recommendation – Incorporate CAO by reference into SMP City approach not yet determined

37 SMP to include restoration plan – Reestablish or upgrade impaired shoreline ecological functions or processes Draft plan prepared by TRPC – Identifies degraded areas – Establishes restoration goals and policies – Identifies existing and on- going projects – Identify new projects and programs – Addresses implementation

38 Existing resources for public access: – West Bay Park – Percival Landing – Heritage Park – Marathon Park – Priest Point Park – East Bay Trail/Park

39 Web Links index.html City Contact: Cari Hornbein, Senior Planner

40

41 Downtown – 65’ with residential bonus (2 stories) Port Peninsula – Ranges from 40’ – 65’ Capitol Lake – 35’ West Bay – 42’with height bonus to 65’

42 Thurston Regional Planning Council (TRPC) is an intergovernmental board made up of local government jurisdictions within Thurston County in Washington State. The Council develops regional plans and policies for transportation, growth management, environmental quality and other topics. TRPC also acts as a regional clearinghouse for planning and demographic information and data.


Download ppt "Shoreline Master Program Update. Shoreline Management Act approved by voters in the early 1970’s to: – Encourage water-dependent uses – Protect shoreline."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google