Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Thunder Parent Information Session www.tuhsd.k12.az.us/dvh.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Thunder Parent Information Session www.tuhsd.k12.az.us/dvh."— Presentation transcript:

1 Thunder Parent Information Session

2  Mission: Desert Vista inspires a community of learning by demonstrating excellence in academics, arts and extra-curricular activities.  Vision: We strive for excellence by engaging our community, promoting accountability, fostering responsibility and encouraging life- long learning.

3 Communication Consistency Care

4  Website   Grades online  Community paper  District communication  Response within 24 hours

5  Academic Support ◦ Pro-active measures in identifying academic needs ◦ Opportunities for improvement  Rigor, Relevance and Relationships ◦ All learners will be challenged ◦ Career readiness programs ◦ Partnering with students and parents  Professional Learning Communities (PLC) ◦ Staff Development ◦ 15 early releases-Wednesday dismissal at 2:12pm

6  Informational meetings ◦ Freshman Orientation-Friday, August 6 ◦ 8 th grade Open House ◦ Curriculum Night ◦ Financial Aid/Scholarship Night ◦ NCAA Clearinghouse/College Recruiting ◦ How to prepare your child for high school-5 th -8 th grade ◦ Support Groups-Guidance Department  Requested team meetings ◦ IEP ◦ 504 ◦ Behavior ◦ Attendance ◦ Academic

7 Academic Social Dress Extra-Curricular

8  Research  Suggestions

9  Research shows when parents are involved students have 6 :  Higher grades, test scores, and graduation rates  Better school attendance  Increased motivation, better self-esteem  Lower rates of suspension  Decreased use of drugs and alcohol  Fewer instances of violent behavior

10  The more intensely parents are involved, the more beneficial the achievement effects. 8  The more parents participate in schooling, in a sustained way, at every level -- in advocacy, decision-making and oversight roles, as fund-raisers and boosters, as volunteers and para- professionals, and as home teachers -- the better for student achievement. 9

11  Families whose children are doing well in school exhibit the following characteristics: 16  Establish a daily family routine.  Monitor out-of-school activities.  Model the value of learning, self- discipline, and hard work.

12  Express high but realistic expectations for achievement.  Encourage children's development/ progress in school.  Encourage reading, writing, and discussions among family members.

13  Attend Curriculum Night, Monday, August 23 and jot down notes regarding each class.  Keep a copy of your child’s schedule handy.  Read all syllabi thoroughly and talk about each one with your child.  Input teacher and counselor address in your address book.  Check the teacher’s website for the syllabus and grade reports weekly to determine the status of your child’s progress.

14  On a regular basis, discuss with your child their progress regarding daily homework completion, project completion, attending tutoring, and test/quiz preparation.  Hold your child accountable for having these items and sharing with you.

15  Have pre-determined expectations, consequences and reinforcement for your child completing or not completing any of the above items.  Be aware of teacher availability for academic assistance.  Encourage your child to self advocate for his or her academic success.

16  Multiple Social Media Devices

17  Parents’ Beliefs ◦ 87% say they have established rules for their kids Internet use ◦ 54% feel they are limited to monitor and shelter their kids from inappropriate material on the Internet  Students’ Reality ◦ 36% say parents or guardians have NOT made rules for their use of the Internet ◦ 41% do NOT share what they do and where they go on the Internet with their parents ◦ 29% say their parent or guardian would disapprove if they knew what they were doing on the Internet

18  Parents’ Beliefs ◦ 69% feel they know a lot about what their kids do on the Internet ◦ 31% have disciplined their child because of their Internet use  Students’ Reality ◦ 36% have NOT discussed how to be safe on the Internet with their parent or guardian ◦ 22% say the computer they use most often is in their room ◦ 73% say there is a need for kids and teens to learn about Internet safety

19  Cyber-bullying-research on 4 th -8 th graders ◦ 42% have been bullied online ◦ 1 in 4 have been multiple victims ◦ 35% have been threatened while online ◦ 1 in 5 have had multiple threats ◦ 21% have received mean or threatening e- mails or other messages ◦ 58% say that someone has said mean or hurtful things about them online

20 ◦ 4 in 10 said it has happened more than once ◦ 53% say they have said something mean or hurtful about someone else ◦ 1 in 3 have done it more than once ◦ 58% who have experienced this type of Cyber-Bullying have not told their parents

21  Samantha, the cyber bullying victim, agrees that parents have to play an active role in knowing what's going on on-line in their children's lives. "It's not a matter of invading your child's privacy, it's a matter of being a parent," she said.  For more information on how to combat cyber bullying, visit the I-Safe website at i-safe.org. I- SAFE America is a non-profit foundation whose mission is to educate and empower youth to make their Internet experiences safe and responsible.

22  Sexting-Sexy Texting ◦ Sending nude, semi-nude, or erotic pictures of themselves and text message them to others ◦ Survey suggest 20% of American teens send sexting messages ◦ Teenage girls practice this more than teenage boys-22% to 18% respectively ◦ 11% of girls ages said they have send a sexting message, that is about 1 in 10. ◦ Besides the legal issue-the digital image is out there forever. They can never delete it.

23  Know your child’s friends and parents and build a relationship with the friends.  Know who your child communicates with on social media sites.  Have access to your child’s social media site.  Check your child’s social media sites on a regular basis

24  Have prior expectations and consequences for appropriate interactions on social media sites.  Embrace diversity and be mindful of our actions. “Perception is Reality.”  Be informed of TUHSD Discrimination and Harassment Policy.

25  No BBBB (Breasts, backs, buttocks or bellies)  No tube tops, spaghetti straps, halter tops, razorbacks, buttocks skin showing, muscle T, undergarments showing, slippers, PJ’s, doo- rags, bandanas, chains or saggy pants. ◦ Short shorts, short skirts and skinny pants pose problems. Please check these garments fit before they leave home.

26  Booster Organizations  Thunder Board  Site Council  Volunteer -application ◦ Chaperone ◦ Event Workers ◦ Clubs ◦ Tutoring/support in classes  Teacher Appreciation

27  1 Clark, R.M. (1990). Why Disadvantaged Children Succeed. Public Welfare (Spring):  2 Cotton, K., Wikelund, K., Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, School Improvement Research Series. In Parent Involvement in Education.  3 Cotton, K., Wikelund, K., Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, School Improvement Research Series. In Parent Involvement in Education.  4 Rose, Gallup, & Elam, 1997  5 Rose, Gallup, & Elam, 1997  6 Parent Teacher Association  7 Walberg (1984) in his review of 29 studies of school–parent programs.

28  8 Cotton, K., Wikelund, K., Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, School Improvement Research Series. In Parent Involvement in Education.  9 Williams, D.L. & Chavkin, N.F. (1989). Essential elements of strong parent involvement programs. Educational Leadership, 47, 18-20

29  10 Reynolds, et, al., (6)  11 Clark (7:85-105)  Review of Educational Research, a journal of the American Educational Research Association  13 Roberts, In Online Resources for Parent/Family Involvement. ERIC Digest by Ngeow, Karen Yeok-Hwa,  14 Tizard, J.; Schofield, W.N.; & Hewison, J. (1982). Collaboration Between Teachers and Parents in Assisting Children’s Reading.

30  15 Sattes (5:2)  16 Henderson (1:9)  17 Epstein, 1995, p. 703  18 Steinberg (8)  19 Dauber and Epstein (11:61)  20 Leler, H. (1983) Parent Education and Involvement in Relation to the Schools and to Parents of School-aged Children.  21 Morton-Williams, R. “The Survey of Parental Attitude and Circumstances, 1964.”  22 Epstein, J.L. (1992) School and Family Partnerships.  23 Epstein J.L. (1984, March). Single Parents and Schools: The effects of marital status Parent and Teacher Evaluations. 23 Clark, R.M. (1990). Why Disadvantaged Children Succeed. Public Welfare (Spring):

31  23 Clark (7:85-105)  23 Cotton, K., Wikelund, K., Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, School Improvement Research Series. In Parent Involvement in Education.  23 Epstein, 1995, p. 703  23 Steinberg (8)  Review of Educational Research, a journal of the American Educational Research Association  23 Roberts, In Online Resources for Parent/Family Involvement. ERIC Digest by Ngeow, Karen Yeok-Hwa, 1999.

32  23 Tizard, J.; Schofield, W.N.; & Hewison, J. (1982). Collaboration Between Teachers and Parents in Assisting Children’s Reading.  23 Sattes (5:2)  23 Henderson (1:9)  23 Dauber and Epstein (11:61)  23 Leler, H. (1983) Parent Education and Involvement in Relation to the Schools and to Parents of School-aged Children.  23 Morton-Williams, R. “The Survey of Parental Attitude and Circumstances, 1964.”  23 Epstein, J.L. (1992) School and Family Partnerships.  23 Epstein J.L. (1984, March). Single Parents and Schools: The effects of marital status Parent and Teacher Evaluations.  March 2002


Download ppt "Thunder Parent Information Session www.tuhsd.k12.az.us/dvh."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google