Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Introduction to Student Learning Objectives [Presenter Name(s)] [Month Year]

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Introduction to Student Learning Objectives [Presenter Name(s)] [Month Year]"— Presentation transcript:

1 Introduction to Student Learning Objectives [Presenter Name(s)] [Month Year]

2 The mission of the Center on Great Teachers and Leaders (GTL Center) is to foster the capacity of vibrant networks of practitioners, researchers, innovators, and experts to build and sustain a seamless system of support for great teachers and leaders for every school in every state in the nation. Center on Great Teachers and Leaders’ Mission 2

3 Comprehensive Centers Program 2012–17 Award Cycle 3

4  GTL is developing a series of modules. PowerPoint, Facilitators Guide, Module Activities, Resources  SLO Module Goals Workshops aim to build regional center capacity to support SEA student learning objectives (SLO) consideration and/or implementation. Module materials were developed to build a common language and understanding of the SLO cycle and a variety of SLO approaches. Materials were developed for future SEA-level SLO meetings/workshops cofacilitated by the GTL Center and regional centers. Use of these shared materials will lead to a valuable collaboration between GTL Center, regional center, and SEA staff. GTL SLO Module Overview 4

5 1.Introduction to the SLO Cycle 2.Approaches to SLO Guidance 3.Purposes of SLOs 4.SLO Approaches 5.Reviewing SLOs 6.Writing SLOs 7.SLO Technical and Implementation Challenges 8.SLO Lessons Learned: A Review of Teacher Incentive Fund (TIF) Grantees 9.Next Steps for Your Team Student Learning Objectives Agenda 5

6  Please gauge your familiarity with SLOs and how informed you are, with 1 being no prior exposure to SLOs and 4 being very familiar.  Place your Post-it ® Note on the spectrum on the chart paper.  When you hear the term student learning objective, what is one question that comes to mind? Place your questions to the side, and let’s see if they get answered as we go through the training. Connecting Activity No prior exposure Little familiarity Somewhat familiar Very familiar

7 Introduction to the SLO Cycle 7

8 An SLO is a measurable, long-term, academic goal informed by available data that a teacher or teacher team sets at the beginning of the year for all students or for subgroups of students. SLOs as a Measure of Student Growth 8

9 When and Why Did We Start Thinking About SLOs as Measures of Student Growth? 9

10  Many Race to the Top states require or recommend SLOs for at least some teachers.  On the basis of Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) waivers, additional states are considering the use of SLOs.  Teacher Incentive Fund grantees were the early adopters and continue to be trailblazers in the use SLOs. Where Are SLOs Being Used? 10

11 Use in Districts and States District/StateRequired to Use SLOsUse of SLO Data Austin, TXTeachers and administratorsCompensation & Evaluation Denver, COAll teachersCompensation GeorgiaTeachers in NTGSEvaluation Hazelwood, MOAll teachers in SIG schoolsEvaluation IndianaAll teachers in the default modelEvaluation KentuckyAll teachersEvaluation LouisianaTeachers in NTGSEvaluation MarylandTeachers in NTGSEvaluation McMinnville, ORAll teachersCompensation New Haven, CTTeachers in NTGSEvaluation New YorkTeachers in NTGSEvaluation OhioOffered for all teachers and principalsEvaluation Rhode IslandAll teachersEvaluation WisconsinAll teachersEvaluation 11 Source: Lachlan-Hach é, L., Matlach, L., Cushing, E., Mean, M., & Reese, K. (2013). Student learning objectives: Early lessons from the Teacher Incentive Fund. Washington, DC: Teacher Incentive Fund Technical Assistance Network.

12  Teachers reported increased focus on student achievement and data use and increased use of evidence- based practices as a result of the SLO goal-setting process (Community Training and Assistance Center, 2013; What Works Clearinghouse, 2009).  Teachers using SLOs valued the opportunity to analyze data and plan instruction as part of the SLO process and reported feeling “empowered” and taking a more active role in their evaluation after SLOs were implemented (Donaldson, 2012; TNTP, 2012). What Does Early Research Indicate? 12

13  Some positive correlations have been found between the quality of SLOs and student achievement and between the number of objectives met by teachers and student achievement, but mixed results point to a need for more research (Austin Independent School District, 2010; Community Training and Assistance Center, 2013).  SLO approaches vary significantly in terms of teacher agency and SLO comparability (Lachlan-Haché et al., 2013). What Does Early Research Indicate? 13

14  SLOs reinforce evidence-based teaching practices.  SLOs can be used with all teachers.  SLOs are adaptable.  SLOs encourage collaboration.  SLOs acknowledge the value of educator knowledge and skill.  SLOs connect teacher practice to student learning. Why Use SLOs? 14

15 How Are SLOs Developed? 15

16 How Are SLOs Developed? SLO Checklist 16 Baseline and Trend Data Student Population Interval of Instruction Standards and Content Assessments Growth Target(s) Rationale for Growth Target(s) Instructional Strategies  Identifies sources of information about students  Draws upon trend data, if available  Covers all students in the class (or in the case of a targeted SLO, covers all students in the subgroup)  Describes the student population and considers any contextual factors that may impact student growth  Matches the length of the course (e.g., quarter, semester, trimester, year)  Specifies how the SLO will address applicable standards from the highest ranking of the following: (1)Common Core State Standards (2)Academic Content Standards (3)National standards put forth by education organization  Identifies assessments that have been reviewed by content experts to effectively measure course content and reliably measure student learning as intended  Ensures all students in the course have a growth target  Uses baseline or pretest data to determine appropriate growth  Demonstrates teacher knowledge of students and content  Explains why target is appropriate for the population  Addresses observed student needs  Uses data to identify student needs and determine appropriate growth targets  Highlights the instructional methods that will best support the student achievement goals set forth in the SLO  Discusses how the teacher will differentiate instruction in support of this SLO

17 What Does an SLO Look Like? Examples From the Field: Ohio (pages 1–2 in handout) 17

18 18 What Does an SLO Look Like? Examples From the Field: Wisconsin (page 3 in handout)

19 19 What Does an SLO Look Like? Examples From the Field: Indiana (page 15 in handout)

20 The SLO Evaluation Cycle 20 Source: Lachlan-Haché, L., Cushing, E., & Bivona, L. (2012). Student learning objectives as measures of educator effectiveness: The basics. Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research. Retrieved from

21 I. SLO Development 21 Source: Lachlan-Haché, L., Cushing, E., & Bivona, L. (2012). Student learning objectives as measures of educator effectiveness: The basics. Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research. Retrieved from

22 II. SLO Approval Examples From the Field: Ohio (page 1 in handout) Ohio Department of Education 22

23 II. SLO Approval Examples From the Field: Wisconsin (page 2 in handout) 23

24 II. SLO Approval Examples From the Field: The National Center for the Improvement of Educational Assessment, Inc. (page 5 in handout) 24

25 How are your students progressing toward your growth targets? Which students are struggling/exceeding expectations? What additional resources do you need as you work to achieve your SLOs? III. Midcourse Check-In 25

26 Administer the final assessment(s) to students. Collect all relevant information and compile it in a useful way for the evaluator. Teacher Ask teachers to complete an end-of-year reflection. Score SLOs, and set up a final meeting with the educator. Prepare to give feedback and plan next steps. Evaluator IV. Final Review of SLO Scoring and Attainment 26

27 Student Data Snapshot 27 Student Pretest (out of 100) Posttest (out of 100) Growth Target Growth Met Growth Target? Student A YES Student B YES Student C NO Student D NO Student E NO

28 Seek opportunities to practice providing critical feedback in a safe and supportive environment. Focus on the summative rating and lessons learned from the process. Address aspects of the educator’s performance that were valuable for improving student learning as well as those aspects that could be improved. Prepare to offer resources to struggling teachers while providing reinforcement and opportunity for effective teachers. V. Discussion of Summative Rating and Impact on Performance 28

29 Activity: Approaches to SLO Guidance 29

30  What was clear, and what did you find confusing about the examples?  What did you like and not like about the examples?  What would work with your state(s)? SLO Approaches Activity 30

31 Activity: Purposes of SLOs 31

32 Reflecting on the SLO Process 32 Integration How does the SLO process fit into your current work? Alignment How does the SLO process align with the goals of your system? Challenges What implementation or technical challenges do you foresee? Positive What are some potential positive outcomes of using SLOs?

33  SLOs reinforce evidence-based teaching practices.  SLOs can be used with all teachers.  SLOs are adaptable.  SLOs encourage collaboration.  SLOs acknowledge the value of educator knowledge and skill.  SLOs connect teacher practice to student learning. Why Use SLOs? 33

34 SLO Approaches 34

35 SLO Approaches 35 Increasing Teacher Agency Increasing SLO Comparability Type 1 Set by teacher or teacher team using available assessments Type 2 Set by teacher or teacher team using assessment list or ranking Type 3 Set by teacher or teacher team using common assessments Type 4 Set by local education agency using common assessments and common growth targets Image adapted from: Lachlan-Haché, L., Matlach, L., Reese, K., Cushing, E., & Mean, M. (2013). Student learning objectives: Early lessons from the Teacher Incentive Fund. Washington, DC: Teacher Incentive Fund Technical Assistance Network.

36 Activity: Reviewing an SLO 36

37  Review the three SLOs provided in the handout.  As you review, jot down questions or concerns about the SLOs using the self-adhesive notes provided.  When finished, place your notes in the appropriate SLO section listed on the chart paper.  As a group, we will review questions and concerns and collectively consider how best to address each. Reviewing an SLO Activity 37

38 Basic Growth Target  All students have the same growth target.  Example: All of my students will grow by 20 points by the end of the semester. Examples of SLO Growth Targets 38

39 Simple Average Growth Calculation  Growth targets are determined by a common formula, but each student has a different growth target based on his or her preassessment score.  Example: Based on the preassessment score, students will score halfway between their baseline score and 100.  If student scored 50 on the preassessment, his or her growth target is 75.  If a student score 40 on the preassessment, his or her growth target is 70. Examples of SLO Growth Targets 39

40 Tiered Growth Target  Group students together based on their preassessment scores.  Divide students into three or more categories (low, mid, advanced).  Example: Examples of SLO Growth Targets 40 Preassessment ScoreGrowth Score 0–45 points65 46–70 points points85

41 Advanced Tiered Growth Target  Students have a tiered target based on their preassessment.  Divide students into three or more categories (low, mid, advanced).  Students have to reach the greater of the two targets.  Example: Examples of SLO Growth Targets 41 Preassessment ScoreGrowth Score 0–45 points65 or +35 points, whichever is greater 46–70 points75 or +15 points, whichever is greater 70+ points85 or +14 points, whichever is greater

42 Activity: Writing an SLO 42

43  Pretend you are a first-year seventh-grade science teacher.  Review the information about your students and the assessment information.  Using this information, write an SLO using either SLO Format 1 or SLO Format 2. Writing an SLO Activity 43

44  What do you see as the potential benefits of having teachers write SLOs?  What was challenging as you attempted to write this SLO?  Reflect on your experience using the SLO template and corresponding checklist. What did you like about the structure of these tools? What would you change to better fit your local context?  Based on your SLO writing experience, what supports or additional knowledge will teachers need to successfully write an SLO? Reflection 44

45 SLO Technical and Implementation Challenges 45

46 What Are the Challenges of Using SLOs? 46

47  Lack of high-quality assessments for all grades and subjects  Difficult to create appropriate growth targets for all students  Challenging to set rigorous but realistic targets  Limits of capacity and resources that make continuous improvement of the SLO process difficult Limitations of SLOs 47

48  Assess the culture change. Recognize that SLOs may represent a shift in educator practice. To build a sustainable culture of SLO use, consider the obstacles that lie ahead, develop teacher confidence in the SLO process, and create a coherent vision of the value of the SLO process. How Do States and Districts Prepare for SLO Implementation? 48

49  Provide supporting materials. Effective SLO implementation requires resources that promote rigor, consistency, and clarity across schools and districts. Templates, checklists, timelines, examples Guidebooks, videos, training materials, FAQ documents Hotlines, office hours Transition plans How Do States and Districts Prepare for SLO Implementation? 49

50  Offer training and rater calibration. Offer ongoing training to ensure rigor and consistency throughout schools and districts. How Do States and Districts Prepare for SLO Implementation? 50

51  Provide a structure and process for scoring SLOs. Foster consistent and fair ratings across teachers and evaluators while producing scores than can be easily combined with other measures to create a final summative rating. How Do States and Districts Prepare for SLO Implementation? 51

52  Monitor and evaluate SLO implementation. Monitor, triangulate, and research the SLO process to promote the rigor, discussion, and reflection that lead to insightful revisions to the system. SLO audits are encouraged in order to ensure fidelity to the SLO process. Establish a committee of stakeholders (teachers, principals, district staff, etc.) to design a process by which SLOs can be verified. How Do States and Districts Prepare for SLO Implementation? 52

53  SLOs can be considered an investment in our profession. They highlight best practices, create opportunities for collaboration, and provide a valuable link between instruction, curricula, and assessment.  If implemented sustainably and well, SLOs can drive professional learning, nurture assessment literacy, and build educator capacity for data-driven instruction. What Lies in the Future for SLOs? 53

54 SLO Lessons Learned: A Review of TIF Grantees 54

55  Sit with your state teams.  Read the lessons learned.  Select two lessons learned that are critical for your state to consider.  Complete worksheets on pages 5 and 6 of the activity packet. Lessons Learned Activity 55

56 Next Steps for Your Team 56

57 Use the Next Steps Worksheet to consider the following with your team members:  What are the benefits of SLOs that your team wants to communicate?  What are some decisions your team needs to make?  What are the challenges your team needs to consider?  Where do you need more examples or support to do this work well? Next Steps for Your Team 57

58  AIR SLO Implementation Scorecard and White Papers:  Center for Assessment SLO Toolkit:  Center on Great Teachers and Leaders:  Crafting Business Rules for SLOs:  Colorado Department of Education Assessment Inventory:  Reform Support Network SLO Toolkit: Resources to Share 58

59  Austin Independent School District. (2010). AISD REACH program update. Austin, TX: Author. Retrieved from  Community Training and Assistance Center. (2013). It’s more than money: Teacher Incentive Fund—Leadership for Educators’ Advanced Performance Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools. Boston, MA: Author.  Donaldson, M. L. (2012). Teachers’ perspectives on evaluation reform. Washington, DC: Center for American Progress.  Lachlan-Haché, L., Matlach, L., Reese, K., Cushing, E., & Mean, M. (2013). Student learning objectives: Early lessons from the Teacher Incentive Fund. Washington, DC: Teacher Incentive Fund Technical Assistance Network.  Lachlan-Haché, L., Cushing, E., & Bivona, L. (2012). Student learning objectives as measures of educator effectiveness: The basics. Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research. Retrieved from  Lachlan-Haché, L., Cushing, E., & Bivona, L. (2012). Student learning objectives: Benefits, challenges, and solutions. Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research. Retrieved from  TNTP. (2012). Summer report: Creating a culture of excellence in Indiana schools. Indianapolis, IN: Indiana Department of Education.  What Works Clearinghouse. (2009). Using student achievement data to support instructional decision making. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance. References 59

60 Advancing state efforts to grow, respect, and retain great teachers and leaders for all students Lisa Lachlan-Haché, Ed.D. Ellen Cushing Monica Mean 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street NW Washington, DC Contact Information


Download ppt "Introduction to Student Learning Objectives [Presenter Name(s)] [Month Year]"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google