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How can we use differentiation to get to the teenage brain?

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Presentation on theme: "How can we use differentiation to get to the teenage brain?"— Presentation transcript:

1 How can we use differentiation to get to the teenage brain?

2 I. Welcome and Introduction II. Background: Process-Product-Content- Learning Environment I. Match Game-Sorting II. Differentiation using R.A.F.T III. Differentiation Using Technology IV. Group Activity-Differentiation Activity V. Work on Lesson Plans VI. Closure VII. Questions, Comments, and Evaluation

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4  Content-- what the student needs to learn or how he/she will access the information  Process-- activities in which the student engages to make sense of the information and master it  Products-- culminating projects in which the student rehearses, applies or extends what he or she has learned  Learning Environment-- the way the classroom looks and feels Excerpted from Tomlinson, C.A. (August 2000) Differentiation of Instruction in the Elementary Grades, ERIC Digest, ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education I

5  Using reading materials at different reading levels  Putting text on tape  Using spelling or vocabulary lists at readiness level of students  Presenting information through visual and auditory means  Using reading buddies  Meeting with small groups to re-teach ideas or skills for struggling learners or extend the thinking or skills of advanced learners Excerpted from Tomlinson, C.A. (August 2000) Differentiation of Instruction in the Elementary Grades, ERIC Digest, ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education I

6  Using tiered activities--all learners working with same understandings and skills, but with different levels of support or challenge  Creating interest centers that encourage students to explore parts of the class topic of particular interest to them  Providing agendas--task lists containing whole class work and work addressing individual needs of students  Providing manipulatives or hands-on materials  Varying length of time to complete tasks I Excerpted from Tomlinson, C.A. (August 2000) Differentiation of Instruction in the Elementary Grades, ERIC Digest, ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education

7  Giving options on how to express required learning (make a mural, write a letter, create a puppet show, etc.)  Using different rubrics to match and extend students’ skills levels  Allowing students to work alone or in groups to complete product  Encouraging students to create own product as long as it contains the required elements I Excerpted from Tomlinson, C.A. (August 2000) Differentiation of Instruction in the Elementary Grades, ERIC Digest, ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education

8  Allowing for places to work quietly without distraction, as well as places for students to work collaboratively  Setting clear guidelines for independent work  Developing routines for students to get help when teacher is busy working with other students  Allowing for those students who need to move around when learning, while others need to sit quietly Excerpted from Tomlinson, C.A. (August 2000) Differentiation of Instruction in the Elementary Grades, ERIC Digest, ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education I

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13  High level calculators  Computers  Clickers  iPads  Cell Phones  GPS devices  Video Cameras  Note Taking Pens

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16 16 Differentiation Activity – Reading Your task is to take the following instructional objective and identify two differentiation strategies that might be used to teach the objective. Objective: Students will complete a report on the book The Outsiders. Identify the pros and cons of using both strategies in a class of 25 students that includes these 5 students: Sherry likes to be asked to do things by the teacher. She is interested in fitting in and speaks out often in class. She has a wild imagination and loves to read, but her comprehension skills are below grade level. Jimmy is hyperactive and likes to dance around the room when class is near the end. He is an audio/visual learner, is a solid reader, and enjoys excelling and being the “best.” He gets very excited to start new books, but they don’t hold his attention for long. Terrance does not feel a connection to school. He is a very intelligent student, but he “follows.” He seems to do well in every type of activity when he applies himself. He has exhibited strong reading skills, but does not always complete work. Jack failed reading three times. He is an expert hunter and fisherman and knows more about the outdoors than anyone. He seems to learn best with hands-on activities. His reading & writing skills have only slightly improved over the last 2 years. Marie is a very quick learner. She seems to get things just by listening. She likes to excel. She is very concerned about rules and right vs. wrong. She is a natural leader. Her reading and writing skills are both above grade level. V

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19  The Differentiated Classroom: Responding to the Needs of All Learners (Tomlinson, 1999).  Excerpted from Tomlinson, C.A. (August 2000) Differentiation of Instruction in the Elementary Grades, ERIC Digest, ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education  Thomlison and Imbeau, 2010  Cooperative Learning in the Science Classroom, Glencoe Professional Series  vs-breadth/ vs-breadth/


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