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NCAA Eligibility Center. 1. General Information 2. Academic Eligibility 3. Core Courses, GPA & Test Scores 4. Certification – Academic & Amateur 5. Steps.

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Presentation on theme: "NCAA Eligibility Center. 1. General Information 2. Academic Eligibility 3. Core Courses, GPA & Test Scores 4. Certification – Academic & Amateur 5. Steps."— Presentation transcript:

1 NCAA Eligibility Center

2 1. General Information 2. Academic Eligibility 3. Core Courses, GPA & Test Scores 4. Certification – Academic & Amateur 5. Steps to Take 6. Registering for the Eligibility Center 7. Recruiting 8. Things to Consider 9. Summary 10. Resources

3 Formerly known as the NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse Located in Indianapolis, IN. Responsible for ALL initial-eligibility certifications for prospective student-athletes entering Division I and II institutions. Initial-eligibility certification includes and academic AND amateur certification

4 A. Division I Requirements B. Division II Requirements C. Division III Requirements

5 To participate in athletics and/or receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of a Division I School, you MUST: Graduate from high school on time! Complete 16 core courses: Earn a minimum required grade point average in core courses Earn a combined SAT or ACT sum score that matches your core-course grade point average and test score sliding scale.  4 years of English  3 years of math (algebra 1 or higher)  2 years of natural or physical science (including one year of lab science)  1 extra year of English, math, or natural or physical science  2 years of social science  4 years of extra core courses

6 Time Constraint: You MUST graduate from high school with your incoming ninth-grade class. If high school graduation is on June 2, you must graduate June 2. If you do not, you have not completed your requirements “on time.” You have four years or eight semesters to complete the 16 core-course requirement. If you graduate on time, you may use one core course completed after graduation to meet NCAA Division I eligibility requirements.

7 Graduate from high school Complete 14 core courses. All core courses completed before full-time enrollment may be used by the Eligibility Center Earn a 2.00 GPA in core courses. Earn a combined SAT score of 820 or ACT sum score of 68. There is no sliding scale in Division II To participate in athletics and/or receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of a Division II School, you MUST:  3 years of English  2 years of math (algebra 1 or higher)  2 years of natural or physical science (including one year of lab science)  2 extra years of English, math, or natural or physical science  2 years of social science  3 years of extra core courses

8 Division III does not use the Eligibility Center. Please contact the Division III college or university to inquire about its policies on admission, financial aid, competition and practice.

9 Definition of a Core Course:  A course that qualifies for high school graduation in one or more of the following: English, mathematics, natural or physical science, social science, foreign language, religion or philosophy;  Is considered four-year college preparatory  Is taught at or above the high school’s regular academic level  Mathematic courses are at the Algebra 1 level or higher  Taught by a qualified instructor as defined by the appropriate academic authority.

10 To access North Point High School’s list of approved courses on line, go to : Select “resources”, then “US High School students” and “List of Approved Core Courses” on the right under “Are You on Track” Then select “List of Approved Core Courses” from the menu bar on the left. Enter North Point’s school code (HS code ) and press submit.

11 Division I Requirements based on GPA

12 Division II does not use a sliding scale with GPA & Test Scores. GPA must be or higher Combined SAT score of 820 or ACT sum score of 68

13 A. Early Certification B. Academic Certification C. Amateurism

14 If you meet the following criteria after six semesters, you will be certified as a qualifier: Minimum SAT (math and critical reading) of 1000 or minimum sum score of 85 on the ACT; For Division I: Core-course grade-point average (GPA) of 3.0 or higher in a minimum of 13 core courses: 3 English, 2 math, 2 science & 6 additional core courses. For Division II: Core-course GPA of 3.0 or higher in a minimum of 12 core courses: 3 English, 2 math, 2 science & 5 additional courses.

15 3 Components to Academic Certification Qualifying score on ACT or SAT Qualifying GPA in core classes Graduation from High School

16 Eligibility Center encourages student-athletes to update their athletic participation information often, especially if they participate in events outside of the normal high school season. Stay college eligible – always ask before you act! Amateurism Red Flags…Ask questions before: Signing a contract with a professional team Receiving money for participating in athletics Receiving prize money above actual and necessary expenses Playing with professional athletes Trying out, practicing or competing with a professional team Receiving benefits from an agent or prospective agent Agreeing to be represented by an agent Participating in organized competition after your first opportunity to enroll in college

17 Freshmen & Sophomores Start planning now. Take classes that match your high school’s NCAA List of Approved Core Courses. Juniors: At the beginning of your junior year, log on to the Eligibility Center Web site at and register. $60.00 registration fee.www.eligibilitycenter.org Register to take the ACT,SAT or both and use the Eligibility Center Code “9999” as a score recipient. Double check to make sure you’re taking approved courses. Request that your high school guidance counselor send an official transcript to the Eligibility Center after completing junior year. NO FAXED Transcripts

18 Seniors: Take the SAT and/or ACT as often as you feel necessary. The Eligibility Center will use the best scores from each section of the SAT or ACT to determine your best cumulative score Continue to take core courses Review Amateurism questionnaire responses and request final amateurism certification beginning April 1 (for fall enrollees) or October 1 (for spring enrollees). Graduate ON TIME!! If you fall behind, use summer school sessions prior to graduation to catch up. After graduation, ask your high school guidance counselor to send your final transcript to the Eligibility Center with proof of graduation.

19 - To create a new account either click on the “New Account” button on the top right of screen or the cell phone on the left. Valid address required – be sure to use one that will be active after you have graduated from high school. Follow directions to complete the process $65 registration fee

20 A. Overview B. Freshman Year C. Sophomore Year D. Junior Year E. Senior Year

21 Before a Division I college or university may invite you on an official visit, you must provide them with a copy of your high school transcript and SAT or ACT score(s). You must also register with the Eligibility Center. Division II colleges and universities require official SAT or ACT scores, along with registering with the Eligibility Center. You may take a maximum of five expense-paid visits, with no more than one permitted to any single college or university. This restriction applies only for expense-paid visits to Division I or II institutions.

22 Get settled in high school. Concentrate on a solid high school curriculum. Setup a workout schedule allowing comfortable time for academics and sports If you think you are interested in attending a college for a sport, send an introduction letter or in your freshman year.. Prepare your athletic resume.

23 Continue striving for academic success. Research NCAA academic requirements. Make sure that you are “on target” for all core requirements. Visit your High School career center to start investigating colleges and their admission requirements. Refine and update your resume. Send an updated letter to the schools you are interested in. During the summer between your Sophomore and Junior years, update your athletic resume.

24 Continue or begin to send out athletic resumes now, if you have not already done so. Register with the NCAA Initial Eligibility Clearinghouse (it’s never too early, but it can be too late) Request that ACT/SAT test scores be sent to the NCAA Initial Eligibility Clearninghouse Keep up with studies and review NCAA requirements to make sure they have not changed. Keep investigating other colleges and send out additional resumes. Visit some of the campuses that you are interested in.

25 In July, after completion of your Junior year, phone contacts initiated by college coaches is permissible. Begin heavy contact with the schools you are interested in, even making a few phone calls (but REMEMBER that coaches cannot call you back until July 1 st after you complete your junior year). Update your academic information with the Clearinghouse. If your top choices of colleges have not panned out send MORE info to your second and third choices. If coaches want to make home visits, they will do this after July 1 st. Update academics with Clearinghouse.

26 DO NOT WAIT UNTIL YOUR SENIOR YEAR TO MAKE FIRST CONTACT OR REGISTER FOR THE CLEARINGHOUSE Do not let up on academics Review core requirements with your high school counselor Send out your team schedule as soon as possible. Keep college coaches posted on any changes or updates to your team schedules. Send out last of resumes, if new interest in other schools Find out Letter of Intent dates for your sport from NCAA Take advantage of no more than five college paid Official Visits, if offered. Ask a lot of questions and weigh all the advantage and disadvantages of the schools your are interested in.

27 A. Balancing Academics and Athletics B. What to Consider when looking at a college C. Level of Play D. Financial Aid E. Probability of Making it to Pros

28 Time Requirements of College Athletics 12 Credit Hours course load minimum National Championship Season – 20 hours per week Includes: 20 Competitions Strength Training Meetings Individual Training Sessions Individual Meetings The Critical Skill – Time Management

29 Can you live away from home? Country/Region of the Country City – Large, Midsize, Small School – Large, Midsize, Small/Private or State Starter, Substitute, Practice Player, Red-shirt (A year of not competing but can train and can be on scholarship) Quality of FIT or Quantity of Financial Aid (Scholarship)? Is it the right FIT for you? Level of Play?

30 Differences between NCAA Division I, II, III & NAIA? Number of scholarships offered by sport Rules governing the sports and institutions with regard to recruiting, training & competition Standard of play Level of Play

31 All athletic scholarships awarded by NCAA institutions are limited to one year and are renewable each academic year and may be reduced or withdrawn. Athletic scholarships may be renewed each academic year for a maximum of five years within a six-year period of continuous college attendance. Athletics scholarships are awarded in a variety of amounts, ranging from full scholarships (including tuition fees, room, board and books) to partial scholarships (e.g. books only). THERE ARE NO FOUR-YEAR ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIPS!!!

32 Approximately 3.3% of senior girls will play at a NCAA member institution Approximately 1% of NCAA female senior players will get drafted by WNBA Approximately.02% of high school seniors will eventually be drafted by a WNBA team High School Student Athletes452,929 High School Senior Student Athletes129,408 NCAA Student Athletes15,096 NCAA Freshman Roster Positions4,313 NCAA Senior Student Athletes3,355 NCAA Student Athletes Drafted32 Percent High School to NCAA3.3% Percent NCAA to Professional1.0% Percent High School Senior to Professional.02%

33 Approximately 5.7% of senior boys will play at a NCAA member institution Approximately 1.8% of NCAA male senior players will get drafted by NFL Approximately.08% of high school seniors will eventually be drafted by a NFL team High School Student Athletes1,071,775 High School Senior Student Athletes306,221 NCAA Student Athletes61,252 NCAA Freshman Roster Positions17,501 NCAA Senior Student Athletes13,612 NCAA Student Athletes Drafted250 Percent High School to NCAA5.7% Percent NCAA to Professional1.8% Percent High School Senior to Professional.08%

34 Approximately 3% of senior boys will play at a NCAA member institution Approximately 1.2% of NCAA male senior players will get drafted by NBA Approximately. 03% of high school seniors will eventually be drafted by a NBA team High School Student Athletes546,355 High School Senior Student Athletes156,096 NCAA Student Athletes16,571 NCAA Freshman Roster Positions4,735 NCAA Senior Student Athletes3,682 NCAA Student Athletes Drafted44 Percent High School to NCAA3.0% Percent NCAA to Professional1.2% Percent High School Senior to Professional.03%

35 All students planning to participate in Division I or II athletics as a freshman must register with the NCAA Eligibility Center Students must receive both an academic AND amateurism certification Division I: High School graduation, 16 core courses, core GPA/test score sliding scale. Division II: High School graduation, 14 core courses, 2.0 core GPA, 820 SAT or 68 ACT Division III: Students are not certified by the Eligibility Center

36 Eligibilitycenter.org College-bound student athletes complete their registration Check Status Download and print a copy of the 2009/2010 Guide for the College-Bound Student Athlete. Access list of approved courses NCAA.org Under “Academics & Athletes” section. Click on “Eligibility & recruiting” and then click on “Information for College-Bound Student-Athletes and Parents.” Act.org Collegeboard.com Northpointathletics.org for a copy of this presentation.


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