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1 Quarter 2 Pre-Assessment Teacher Directions Grade Reading 12 Selected-Response Items 1 Constructed Response Research 3 Constructed-Response Writing 1.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Quarter 2 Pre-Assessment Teacher Directions Grade Reading 12 Selected-Response Items 1 Constructed Response Research 3 Constructed-Response Writing 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Quarter 2 Pre-Assessment Teacher Directions Grade Reading 12 Selected-Response Items 1 Constructed Response Research 3 Constructed-Response Writing 1 Full Composition (Performance Task) 1 Brief Write 1 Write to Revise Writing w/ Integrated Language 1 Language/Vocabulary 1 Edit/Clarify Performance Task at Grade Level. Performance Task at Grade Level. Sequential Steps toward Standard Mastery.

2 Quarter Two Pre-Assessment Quarter Two Pre-Assessment Note: There may be more standards per target. Only standards assessed are listed.

3 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond This is a pre-assessment to measure the task of writing an informational article. Full compositions are always part of a Performance Task. A complete performance task would have: Part 1 A Classroom Activity (30 Minutes) Activity should include 1.New language and vocabulary students may encounter in passages (taught through a source that does not pre-teach the actual passages) 2.A video, class/group activity or read aloud to build background such as: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lf26jtJfL30 (35 minutes – Independent work) Passages or stimuli to Read 3 Research Questions There may be other constructed response questions. Part 2 A Full-Composition (70 Minutes) Students should have access to spell-check resources but no grammar-check resources. Students can refer back to their passages, notes and 3 research questions and any other constructed responses, as often they’d like. Directions 30 minutes 1.You may wish to have a 30 minute classroom activity. The purpose of a PT activity is to ensure that all students are familiar with the concepts of the topic and know and understand key terms (vocabulary) that are at the upper end of their grade level (words they would not normally know or are unfamiliar to their background or culture). The classroom activity DOES NOT pre-teach any of the content that will be assessed! 35 minutes 2.Students read the passages independently. If you have students who can not read the passages you may read them to those students but please make note of the accommodation. Remind students to take notes as they read. During an actual SBAC assessment students are allowed to keep their notes as a reference. 3.Students answer the 3 research questions or other constructed response questions. Students should also refer to their answers when writing their full opinion piece. 15 minute break 70 Minutes 4. Students write their full composition (informational piece). SCORING An Informational Rubric is provided. Students receive three scores: 1.Organization and Purpose 2.Evidence and Elaboration 3.Conventions 3

4 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond Directions The HSD Elementary assessments are neither scripted nor timed assessments. They are a tool to inform instructional decision making. It is not the intent of these assessments to have students “guess and check” answers for the sake of finishing an assessment. All students should “move toward” taking the assessments independently but many will need scaffolding strategies. If students are not reading at grade level and can’t read the text, please read the stories to the students and ask the questions. Allow students to read the parts of the text that they can. Please note the level of differentiation a student needed. Order at HSD Print Shop… op/WebSubmissionForms.aspx Order at HSD Print Shop… op/WebSubmissionForms.aspx About this Assessment This assessment includes: Selected-Response, Constructed-Response, and a Performance Task. Types of SBAC Constructed Response Rubrics in this Assessment Reading 2 Point Short Response 3 Point Extended Response Writing 4 Point Full Composition Rubric (Performance Task) 3 Point Brief Write (1-2 Paragraphs) Rubric 3 Point Write to Revise Rubrics as Needed Research 2 Point Rubrics Measuring Research Skill Use Quarter 2 Performance Task The underlined sections are those scored on SBAC. 2 days Please take 2 days to complete performance tasks. Part 1Part 2 Classroom Activity if Desired/Needed Read two paired passages. Take notes while reading (note-taking). Answer SR and CR research questions about sources Components of Part 1 Note-Taking: A teacher’s note-taking form with directions and a note-taking form for your students to use for this assessment is provided, or you may use whatever formats you’ve had past success with before Students take notes as they read passages to gather information about their sources. Students are allowed to use their notes to later write a full composition (essay). Note-taking strategies should be taught as structured lessons throughout the school year in grades K – 6. A teacher’s note-taking form with directions and a note-taking form for your students to use for this assessment is provided, or you may use whatever formats you’ve had past success with. Please have students practice using the note-taking page in this document before the actual assessment if you choose to use it. Research: In Part 1 of a performance task students answer constructed response questions written to measure a student’s ability to use research skills needed to complete a performance task. These CR questions are scored using the SBAC Research Rubrics rather than reading response rubrics. Plan your essay (brainstorming -pre-writing). Write, Revise and Edit (W.5) Writing a Full Composition or Speech Components of Part 2 Planning Students review notes and sources and plan their composition. Write, Revise and Edit Students draft, write, revise and edit their writing. Word processing tools should be available for spell check (but no grammar check). Full Written Informational Composition introduction (identifies the topic and provides a focus) organization (definition, classification, comparison/contrast, etc.), development (with facts, concrete details, quotations, other information) transitions (linking ideas) precise language and domain‐specific vocabulary conclusion (closure) Conventions of Standard English. There are NO Technology-enhanced Items/Tasks (TE) Note: It is highly recommended that students have experiences with the following types of tasks from various on-line instructional practice sites, as they are not on the HSD Elementary Assessments: reordering text, selecting and changing text, selecting text, and selecting from drop-down menu

5 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 5 DOK 1 - KaDOK - KcDOK 1 - CdDOK 1 - CfDOK 2 - ChDOK 2 - CkDOK 2 -ClStandard Mastery Recall who, what, where, when, why and how about a story read and discussed in class. Use and define Standard Academic Language: who, what, where, when, why, and how; ask, answer, questions, key details Connect the terms who to characters; where and when to setting; what and how to sequence of events. Ask and answer who, what, where, when, why and how questions about key details in a text. Concept Development Student understands that key details help tell who, what, where, when, why and how. Uses key details to identify who, what, where, when, why and how about a story not read in class. Finds information using key details to answer specific questions about a new story. RL.2.1 Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text Pre-Assessment and Learning Progressions The pre-assessments are very unique. toward a standard They measure progress toward a standard. Unlike the Common Formative Assessments which measure standard mastery, the pre-assessments are more like a base-line picture of a student’s strengths and gaps, measuring skills and concepts, students need “along the way,” in order to achieve standard mastery. So what about a “post-assessment?” There is not a standardized post-assessment. The true measure of how students are doing “along the way,” is assessed in the classroom during instruction and classroom formative assessment. For this reason The CFA’s are not called “post-assessments.” The CFAs measure the “end goal,” or standard mastery. However, without the pre-assessments, how will we know what our instruction should focus on throughout each quarter? Learning Progressions: are the predicted set of skills needed to be able to complete the required task demand of each standard. The learning progressions were aligned to Hess’ Cognitive Rigor Matrix. The pre-assessments measure student proficiency indicated on the boxes in purple (adjustment points). These points are tasks that allow us to adjust instruction based on performance. For instance, if a student has difficulty on the first “purple” adjustment point (DOK-1, Cf) the teacher will need to go back to the tasks prior to DOK-1 Cf and scaffold instruction to close the gap, continually moving forward to the end of the learning progression. There is a Reading Learning Progression checklist for each standard in each grade that can be used to monitor progress. It is available at: Example of a Learning Progression for RL.2.1 Pre-Assessments Measure Adjustment Points (in purple) CFA RL.2.1 grade-level standard assessment. After the pre-assessment is given, Learning Progressions provide informal formative assessment below and near grade-level “tasks” throughout each quarter. Beg. of QTR Throughout the QTR END of QTR

6 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond Quarter Two Reading Literature Learning Progressions. The indicated boxes highlighted before the standard, are assessed on this pre- assessment. The standard itself is assessed on the Common Formative Assessment (CFA) at the end of each quarter. 6 DOK 1 - KaDOK 1 - KcDOK 1 - Ce DOK 1 - Cf DOK 2 - ChDOK 2 - CkDOK 2 - ClDOK 2 - ANpDOK 2 - ANr DOK 2 - ANt DOK 3 - APx DOK 3 – EVC Standard Recall or locate books that tell stories and books that give informatio n. Define and use Standard Academic Language: explain, differences, major, informatio n text and “books that tell a story.” Use words accurately when identifying literary elements (characters, setting) and information al elements (heading, topic). Answers questions about details in books that tell stories and books that give informati on (read and discussed in c lass) Content Developm ent Understan ds that books have different purposes and can give examples between books that tell stories and books that provide informatio n. Identifies and describes the aspects that are different between books that tell stories and books that give informatio n. Locate specific information in story books and information al books to demonstrate an understandi ng of the differences. Using a wide range of text types, explain the major differences between books that tell stories (literary) and books that give information (information al). Analyze text structure of a range of text types (both literary and information al) by noting the similarities and differences (using a graphic organizer). SELECTED REPONSE Distinguish text features between books that tell stories (literary) and books that give informatio n (informatio nal) by answering questions (new text!). Explains why a text is a story “text” or an information al text by citing evidence and examples SELECTED RESPONSE SELECTED RESPONSE. RL.1.5 Explain major differences between books that tell stories and books that give information, drawing on a wide reading of a range of text types (cite evidence). DOK 1 - KaDOK 1 - KcDOK 1 - CdDOK 1 - CfDOK 2 - ChDOK 2 –CkDOK 2 –ClStandard Retell details about characters in a story (read and discussed in class). Define and use Standard Academic Language: character, setting, identify, telling, speaking and phrase “points in a text.” Uses correct words to explain who spoke in a text (i.e., “___said”or“__ is telling the story now...”). Answers questions about who is speaking in a text (that has been read and discussed in class). SELECTED RESPONSE Concept Development Understands that there are clues in a text to tell us when someone is speaking. Can give examples. SELECTED RESPONSE Identifies different parts of a text that shows when a character is speaking (read in class, but not discussed). Locate information (the part of the text) to identify specifically who is telling the story at various points in a new text. CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE RL.1.6 Identify who is telling the story at various points in a text. DOK 1 - KaDOK 1 - KcDOK 1 - CdDOK 1 - CfDOK 2 - ChDOK 2 - ClDOK 2 - APnStandard Locate illustrations in a story. Recall details about characters, setting or events. (read and discussed in class) Define and use Standard Academic Language: illustrations, story, details, describe, characters, setting and event. Identify an illustration in a story that helps describe a character, setting or event. Identify text details – words – that help describe a character, setting or event. SELECTED RESPONSE Answer who, what, when, where and how questions about literary elements (characters, setting and events). SELECTED REPSONSE Concept Development Explain how details and illustrations are used by an author to describe characters, setting or events. Locate illustrations and details that answer specific questions about characters, setting or events. Obtain and interpret information using illustrations and details to describe characters, setting, or events. CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE RL.1.7 Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.

7 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 7 Quarter Two Reading Informational Learning Progressions. The indicated boxes highlighted before the standard, are assessed on this pre- assessment. The standard itself is assessed on the Common Formative Assessment (CFA) at the end of each quarter. DOK 1 - KaDOK 1 - KcDOK 1 - CeDOK 1 – CfDOK 2 – ChDOK 2 – ClDOK 2 – APnStandard Locate heading, table of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, and icons in texts that have been read and discussed in class. Define and use Standard Academic Language: text features, (e.g., heading, table of contents, glossary, electronic menu, icon), “key fact”, and “information.” Select appropriate words when describing various text features. Answers questions that require finding answers within various text features (read and discussed). Concept Development Understands that various text features help locate information and gives examples. Locate specific information from the text using headings, table of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, and icons that support the central idea (new text not discussed). SELECTED RESPONSE Obtain and interpret information using headings, table of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, and icons (interpret means to apply learned information to a question). SELECTED RESPONSE RI.1.5 Know and use various text features (e.g., headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text. DOK 1 - KaDOK 1 - KcDOK 1 - CeDOK 1 – CfDOK 2 – ChDOK 2 – CkDOK 2 – APnStandard Locate a picture, caption or text in a story that has been read and discussed in class. Define and use Standard Academic Language: illustrations, text, information, words, pictures, provide and distinguish between. Select appropriate term when referring to information provided by pictures (illustrations) or by text (words). Ask and answer who, what, when, why, and how questions about information provided by illustrations and by text. SELECTED RESPONSE Concept Development Understands that information is provided by pictures. Understands that information is provided by text. SELECTED RESPONSE Locate information provided by pictures. Locate information provided by the text. Obtain (select the accurate source for…) information based on text and illustrations. CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE RI.1.6 Distinguish between information provided by pictures or other illustrations and information provided by the words in a text. DOK 1 - KaDOK 1 - KcDOK 1 - CeDOK 1 – CfDOK 2 – ChDOK 2 – ClStandard Retell parts of a story by referring to pictures or words in a text (read and discussed in class). Define and use Standard Academic Language: Illustrations, details, text, describe and phrase key ideas. Select appropriate words when talking about a story (uses the words illustrations and/or text). SELECTED RESPONSE Answer who, what, when, where and how describing questions about key ideas in a text (read and discussed). SELECTED RESPONSE Concept Development Understands that illustrations can show key ideas. Understands that details in the text tell about key ideas Locate key ideas using details in illustrations Locate key ideas using details found in the text. CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE RI.1.7 Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas

8 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 8 Write one new key idea you learned about the main topic.. part of the passage Instruct students to look at a part of the passage they liked or one you’ve chosen for them (a paragraph or section). main topic key idea main topic Ask students “Does this part of the paragraph or section tell you something new about the main topic? (remind them of the main topic). This is a key idea about the main topic. part of the passage Instruct students to look at a part of the passage they liked or one you’ve chosen for them (a paragraph or section). main topic key idea main topic Ask students “Does this part of the paragraph or section tell you something new about the main topic? (remind them of the main topic). This is a key idea about the main topic. key details Ask students to look for key details that explain more about the “something new.” key details key idea key details give evidence to support a key idea (or idea). Example if the main topic is about dogs and... key Idea “The dog likes to play,” (is the key Idea), key details Then some key details might be: the dog likes to play fetch. the dog likes to play with the ball. key details Ask students to look for key details that explain more about the “something new.” key details key idea key details give evidence to support a key idea (or idea). Example if the main topic is about dogs and... key Idea “The dog likes to play,” (is the key Idea), key details Then some key details might be: the dog likes to play fetch. the dog likes to play with the ball Grade 1 Explain more key details about the new key idea you learned. You can use words and pictures to tell about it. Differentiation: In grade one you can scaffold students by starting with writing just a key idea and move toward writing key details. Students who would benefit from enrichment can continue on with more sections or paragraphs. Students who need more direct instruction – teach each part in a mini lesson. These concepts can be taught separately: Main topic Key Ideas Key Details ELL Students may need each part taught using language (sentence) frames emphasizing transitional words. Differentiation: In grade one you can scaffold students by starting with writing just a key idea and move toward writing key details. Students who would benefit from enrichment can continue on with more sections or paragraphs. Students who need more direct instruction – teach each part in a mini lesson. These concepts can be taught separately: Main topic Key Ideas Key Details ELL Students may need each part taught using language (sentence) frames emphasizing transitional words. 33 Remember students will need to have a note- taking form for each passage. R E- read SEARCH SOMETHING NEW EXPLAIN MORE AGAIN and AGAIN RELEVANT OR NOT? CONCLUDE HAVE EVIDENCE

9 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 9 Name_____________________ Passage_________________ Write one new key idea you learned about the main topic. Explain more key details about the new key idea you learned. You can use words and pictures to tell about it. Grade 1 Note-Taking Form

10 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond A Note about constructed responses: Constructed response answers are not written “in stone.” There is no perfect way a student should respond. Look for the general intent of the prompt and student response and follow the rubric below as much as possible. Use your best judgment. Unlike DOK-1 questions where there is one right and wrong answer, constructed responses are more difficult to assess. Overall consistency of intent based on most of your student responses can guide you. Quarter 2 Pre-Assessment Constructed Response Answer Key Standard RL.1.6: 3 Point Reading Constructed Response Rubric Question #7 (prompt): What does Dear say to Snappy? What does Snappy say to Dear? Use words and pictures to tell about it. Directions for Scoring Notes: Write an overview of what students could include in a proficient response with examples from the text. Be very specific and “lengthy.” Teacher Language and Scoring Notes: Sufficient Evidence (conclusion or central idea) of the prompt would be student words and pictures explaining/showing what Snappy and Dear are saying to each other (some words must be included, not just pictures). Specific identifications (key details) would include that Dear says (1) she’s sad to go, (2) she has to find food and (3) it’s going to snow. Key details of what Snappy says would include (1) It’s OK (don’t worry and (2) he will stay and keep the eggs warm. Full Support (other details) could include any information that supports the prompt and is explicitly from the text (not opinion) including pictures and words. 3 The student gives a proficient response by stating what both penguins say (and may include pictures). Dear is the girl. She said she is sad to go but has to get some food. Snappy is the dad. He say it will be ok because he will take care of the eggs when she is gone. 2 The student gives a partial response by stating some of what one or both penguins say ( and may include pictures). Snappy and Dear talk to each other. Snappy is real nice. He said he will babysit the eggs. Dear has to go. 1 The student gives a minimal response by stating vaguely what one or both penguins say (and may include vague pictures). Dear has to go. Snappy is sad too. He will stay. 0 The student provides no evidence of stating what either penguin is saying. Male penguins sit on the egg all winter. Toward RL.1.6 DOK 2 –Cl Locate information (the part of the text) to identify specifically who is telling the story at various points in a new text.

11 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 11 Quarter 2 Pre-Assessment Research Constructed Response Answer Key Constructed Response Research Rubrics Target 4 ability to cite evidence to support opinions and/or ideas Question # 8 Prompt: What information in the text and illustration about Snappy the Penguin, tells that penguins are good swimmers? Teacher /Rubric “Language Response” The response cites evidence of the ability to cite evidence that shows that penguins are good swimmers. The response supports the opinion or idea of the idea that penguins are good swimmers. Students are able to support that penguins are good swimmers using evidence from the text which may include (1) Snappy is a strong swimmer and (2) he can jump out of water onto land. Students are able to support that penguins are good swimmers using evidence from the illustration which may include (1) penguins have flippers and (2) they have webbed feet. Student “Language” Response Example 2 The student response states the idea that penguins are good swimmers and cites evidence to support this. Penguins are very good swimmers. I know its true because the story said Snappy is a strong swimmer. He can jump out of the water. The picture shows that penguins have flippers. They have webbed feet too. That can help them be strong swimmers. 1 The student response states the idea that penguins are good swimmers and cites some evidence to support this. Penguins can swim really good. They have flippers that help them swim. 0 The response does not state a specific idea or cite evidence from the text to answer the prompt. Penguins like to swim in the sea. Toward RL.1.7 DOK 2 - APn Obtain and interpret information using illustrations and details to describe characters, setting, or events.

12 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 12 Quarter 2 Pre-Assessment Research Constructed Response Answer Key Constructed Response Research Rubrics Target 3 evidence of the ability to distinguish relevant from irrelevant information such as fact from opinion Question #15 Prompt: Describe Antarctica using details from the text and illustration. Teacher /Rubric “Language Response” The response distinguishes which evidence is relevant about Antarctica in order to describe it. Students must distinguish relevant evidence from both the text and the map illustration. The relevant evidence can include from the text that Antarctica is (1) cold and (2) windy. Relevant evidence from the map illustration could include that Antarctica is (1) covered in snow, (2) has penguins, (3) has water all around it (students may name the oceans) and (4) is near the South Pole. Student “Language” Response Example 2 The student is able to distinguish evidence that is relevant about describing Antarctica using the text and map. Antarctica is a very cold place. There is a lot of wind. The Antarctica is all white so it has snow. Penguins can live there too. The penguins can swim because there is water all around. 1 The student is able to distinguish some evidence that is relevant about Antarctica from the text or map. Snappy lives in the Antarctica where it is really cold. He swims in the oceans around it. 0 The student is not able to distinguish relevant from irrelevant information about Antarctica. It is far away. Toward RI.1.6 DOK – 2 APn Obtain (select the accurate source for…) information based on text and illustrations.

13 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 13 Quarter 2 Pre-Assessment Research Constructed Response Answer Key Constructed Response Research Rubrics Target 2 Locate, Select, Interpret and Integrate Information. Question # 16 Prompt: How does the penguin’s body help it survive? Teacher /Rubric “Language Response” The response gives sufficient evidence of the ability to locate and select information about how the penguin’s body helps it survive. Information that supports how a penguin’s body helps it survive could include (1) they have fat to keep warm, (2) they can swim well (infers that they can fish) and (3) they have feathers that keep their skin dry and keeps away water. The response gives sufficient evidence of the ability to interpret and integrate information to write an organized response in order to answer the prompt. Student “Language” Response Example 2 Student locates and selects information about how a penguin’s body helps it survive and is able to integrate the information to write an organized response. Penguins live where it is very cold. So they have to stay warm. They have a lot of fat to help them stay warm. Penguins need to swim to catch food. They have a body that can swim. How do they stay dry? The penguin feathers keep it dry even after swimming! 1 Student locates and selects some information about how a penguin’s body helps it survive and is able to integrate the information to write a some-what organized response. Penguins survive because they have a body full of fat. It keeps him warm. They swim good too. 0 The students does not give enough evidence of the ability to locate, select, interpret and integrate information. Penguins are black and white. They walk funny. Toward RI.1.7 DOK-2 Cl Locate key ideas using details in the text.

14 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 14 Note: “Brief Writes” should take no longer than 10 minutes. Brief writes are scored with a 2-3 point rubric. Full compositions are scored with a 4 point rubric. The difference between this rubric and the constructed response reading rubrics, is that the Brief Write Rubric is assessing writing proficiency in a specific area, while the reading rubrics are assessing comprehension. Quarter 2 Pre-Assessment Brief Write Constructed Response Answer Key Organization: Conclusion W.1.2.c Target: 3a Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented. 17.A student is writing a paragraph for the class to describe penguins. Read the paragraph. Penguins Penguins are different than other animals. They live where it is very cold. They have lots of fat to keep them warm. Penguins like to swim and play. Task: Write one or two more sentences that describe penguins. Teacher /Rubric “Language Response” Directions for Scoring: Write an overview of what students could include in a proficient response with examples from the text. Be very specific and “lengthy.” Teacher Language and Scoring Notes: The student response should provide a conclusion (1-2 sentences) that logically follow and support the preceding information about penguins. The description can be (1) appearance or (2) actions. The conclusion does not have to follow “swim and play,” as the other descriptions in the paragraph are varied. Logically, a students’ description should also vary. The conclusion should have a statement that provides an answer to why the preceding information is important, doing more than restating reasons (formulaic ending) or just summarizing main ideas. Student “Language” Response Example 2 The response provides a conclusion that follows logically from the preceding information that describe penguins. Penguins make nests of stones for their eggs. They have feathers all over to keep water away. Penguins are perfect for living in the Antarctica where it is so cold! 1 The response provides a conclusion that is partially related to the information that describe penguins, but veers off into swimming as the purpose of the paragraph instead of adding additional descriptions. Penguins can jump when they swim and when they play. It would be fun to swim like a penguin. 0 The response: provides no conclusion describing penguins. A penguin is an animal. It lives in the snow all day.

15 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond Score Statement of Purpose/Focus and Organization Development: Language and Elaboration of Evidence Conventions Statement of Purpose/Focus Organization Elaboration of Evidence Language and Vocabulary 4Exemplary Uses a combination of drawing, dictation, & writing (K) to compose Explains something more about the topic OR a connection is made between topic & broader idea(s) Clearly presents the topic and focus/controlling idea Intro, body, and conclusion support focus Uses several transitions appropriately (e.g., because, since, and, but, also, for example, since) to connect or group ideas Has a depth of information; insightful Elaborates using a variety of relevant details, definitions, examples, quotes, text evidence to support focus/concepts Maintains voice/tone of knowledgeable person conveying information – knows when to use formal-informal language Uses effective, precise vocabulary and variety of sentence structures Edits with support /resources Has few or no errors in grammar, word usage, or mechanics as appropriate to grade 3Proficient Uses a combination of drawing, dictation, & writing (K) to compose Topic (context) and focus/controlling idea are clearly stated (gr K-3) Has overall coherence (K-3); Provides a concluding statement or section (gr, 1, 2, 3) Groups related ideas (gr3) that support the focus Uses transitions to connect ideas (gr3) Some authentic details, definitions, facts, text evidence support focus Adds labels or captions to illustration, drawing, visuals, charts/tables, or diagram to enhance details, facts, and ideas Produces complete simple (K), compound (g, 1- 3), complex (gr3) sentences Appropriate use of vocabulary (nouns, plurals, verbs, pronouns, adjectives, adverb, content-specific) Uses adult/peer feedback to Revise Edits with support /resources (gr 2-3) Minor errors do not interfere with reader understanding (e.g., capitalization, punctuation; spelling) 2Developing Uses a combination of drawing, dictation, & writing (K) to compose Has topic and attempts a focus/information, but focus may shift or not be relevant to the topic chosen Introduction, body, and conclusion are evident, but may lack clarity or Coherence (e.g., attempts to connect ideas, but may not be logical or make sense) Some elaboration strategies are evident in drawings or writing (gr K-3), or with support/ questioning from peers or adults (gr K -1) Ideas may not be fully elaborated or details may be insufficient to support topic Vocabulary use has minor errors Dictates, writes, and expands simple complete sentences Uses adult/peer feedback to revise Edits with support from peers or adults (gr 2-3) Uses grade- appropriate basic mechanics and word use with some errors 1Emerging Uses a combination of drawing, dictation, & writing (K) to compose Attempts to identify a topic but lacks a focus or may have more than one topic or confusing topic as stated Attempts introduction, body, and conclusion, but one or more parts are missing No details provided or attempts to add details to drawings or writing which may be random, inaccurate, or irrelevant Generally uses basic, incorrect, or below grade level vocabulary when dictating (K) or writing Uses adult/peer feedback to revise Edits with support from peers or adults (gr 2-3) Uses below grade- level basic mechanics with frequent errors 0 A response gets no credit if it provides no evidence of the ability to [fill in with key language from the intended target]. Grades K - 2: Generic 4-Point Informational/Explanatory Writing Rubric Grades K - 2: Generic 4-Point Informational/Explanatory Writing Rubric Working Drafts of ELA rubrics for assessing CCSS writing standards --- © (2010) Karin Hess, National Center for Assessment 15

16 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 16 Quarter 2 Pre-Assessment Selected Response Answer Key

17 17 Student Copy Pre-Assessment Quarter 2 Name____________________Grade Directions: Read each story. Then answer the questions about the story.

18 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 18 Student Directions : Part 1 Your assignment: You will read two texts about penguins. 1.Read both texts. 2.Take notes about the texts. 3.Answer the questions. Part 2 Your assignment: You are going to fly to Antarctica to see Snappy the penguin. When you come back you will write an article describing what you saw for other students to read at your school.​ 1.Plan your writing. You may use your notes and answers. 2.Write – Revise and Edit your first draft. 3.Write a final draft about How you will be scored 1. Purpose: Did you write only about the topic? Organization: Do your ideas go together? Do they make sense? 2. Elaboration of Evidence: Did you show evidence to support your topic? Language and Vocabulary: Did you use words about the topic? Are your sentences easy to read and understand? 3. Conventions: Did you follow rules for capitals, punctuation and spelling?

19 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 19 Snappy the Penguin Snappy is a little penguin. He lives in Antarctica. Snappy is an Adelie Penguin. When Snappy is hungry he eats fish and krill. He does not drink water. Like other penguins, he eats snow. Snappy’s head is all black with a white ring around the eye. He has long tail feathers that drag on the ground when he walks. Snappy’s belly is white. His back is black. Feathers cover most of his short body. Adelie penguins are some of the smallest of the Antarctic penguins. Snappy is very small. He weighs only nine pounds. Snappy is a male penguin. The male penguins take care of the eggs. They make nests of stones, and will fight over the best rocks. Snappy is a strong swimmer. He can jump out of the water onto the land. He loves to sled down hills. He likes to play. Adelie Penguins

20 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond What does the illustration tell the reader? A. Where penguins live. B. How tall penguins are. C. What penguins look like. D. What penguins like to eat. 2.Which part of the story Snappy the Penguin, may not be true? A. Penguins drink water. B. Penguins like to play. C. Penguins live in Antarctica. D. A Penguin named Snappy lives in Antarctica. Toward RL.1.5 DOK 2 - ANr Analyze text structure of a range of text types (both literary and informational) by noting the similarities and differences (using a graphic organizer). Toward RL.1.5 DOK 3 - APx Explains why a text is a story “text” or an informational text by citing evidence and examples.

21 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 21 I Have to Go Stanza 1 “Snappy, Snappy,” “I’m sad that I have to go And find us some food, Before the next big snow.” Stanza 2 “Dear, Dear,” “It will be OK. I will keep our eggs nice and warm, Each and every day.”

22 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 3.Why does Dear have to go? A. Dear has to find some food. B. Dear needs to take care of the eggs. C. Dear wants to swim in the sea. D. Dear goes to see Snappy What clue tells the reader that Snappy is speaking? A. It is going to snow. B. Male penguins take care of the eggs. C. Male penguins hunt for the food. D. Snappy is sad to have to go. Toward RL.1.6 DOK 1 - Cf Answers questions about who is speaking in a text. Toward RL.1.6 DOK 2 - Ch Understands that there are clues in a text to tell us when someone is speaking.

23 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 23 6.Which phrase most describes the setting of the poem? A.In a warm place B.In a cold place C.near some trees D.by a lake 5. How does Dear feel about going to find food? A.happy B.excited C.sad D.glad Toward DOK 1 - Cd Identify text details – words – that help describe a character, setting or event. Toward DOK 1 - Cf Answer who, what, when, where and how questions about literary elements (characters, setting and events).

24 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond What does Dear say to Snappy? What does Snappy say to Dear? Use words and pictures to tell about it. 8. What information in the text and illustration about Snappy the Penguin, tells that penguins are good swimmers? Toward RL.1.6 DOK 2 –Cl Locate information (the part of the text) to identify specifically who is telling the story at various points in a new text. Toward RL.1.7 DOK 2 - APn Obtain and interpret information using illustrations and details to describe characters, setting, or events.

25 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 25 Penguins 1 Penguins are birds but they can’t fly. There are 17 different kinds of penguins. 2 Some penguins live on the continent of Antarctica. It is very cold and windy. The biggest penguin that lives in Antarctica is called the Emperor penguin and the smallest is called the Adelie penguin. 3 Penguins are great swimmers and have lots of fat to keep them warm. They swim very well and spend most of their lives in the sea. 4 They have more feathers than most other birds. Their feathers keep water away and help keep their skin dry. Glossary Paragraph 1 Many Kinds of Penguins Paragraph 2 Emperor and Adelie Penguins Paragraph 3 Penguins Swim Paragraph 4 Feathers

26 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 26 Toward RI.1.5 DOK-2 Cl Locate specific information from the text using headings, table of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, and icons that support the central idea. 9. Look at the glossary. Where can you read about how penguins swim? A.Paragraph 1 B.Paragraph 2 C.Paragraph 3 D.Paragraph 4 Toward RI.1.5 DOK – 2 APn Obtain and interpret information using headings, table of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, and icons. 10. Where does the map show that Emperor and Adelie penguins live? A.near the South Pole B.near the North Pole C.in the water D.on the ice

27 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 27 Toward RI.1.6 DOK – 1 Cf Ask and answer who, what, when, why, and how questions about information provided by illustrations and by text. 11. What is the biggest penguin that lives in Antarctica? A.the Emperor penguin B.the big penguins C.the Adelie penguin D.the male penguin Toward RI.1.6 DOK – 2 Ch Concept Development Understands that information is provided by pictures and text. 12. What can you learn about penguins from the text that you can’t learn from the map? A.Penguins live near oceans. B.Some penguins live in Antarctica. C.Penguins live near the South Pole. D.Penguins have lots of fat to keep them warm.

28 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 14. Why do penguins have more feathers than other birds? A.Their feathers keep them warm. B.Their feathers keep water away and keep them dry. C.Penguins need more feathers because they are so big. D.Penguins like to swim. 13.What is the smallest penguin in the Antarctica called? A. a baby penguin B. the Emperor penguin C. the Adelie penguin D. Many penguins are small. 28 Toward RI.1.7 DOK – 1 Ce Select appropriate words when talking about a story (uses the words illustrations and/or text). Toward RI.1.7 DOK – 1 Cf Answer who, what, when, where and how describing questions about key ideas in a text (read and discussed)

29 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond Describe Antarctica using details from the text and illustration. Toward RI.1.6 DOK – 2 APn Obtain (select the accurate source for…) information based on text and illustrations. 16. How does the penguin’s body help it survive? Toward RI.1.7 DOK-2 Cl Locate key ideas using details in the text.

30 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond A student is writing a paragraph for the class to describe penguins. Read the paragraph. Penguins Penguins are different than other animals. They live where it is very cold. They have lots of fat to keep them warm. Penguins like to swim and play. Task: Write one or two more sentences that describe penguins. Write to Revise a Brief Text, Organization, W.1.2c, writing a conclusion,Target 3a 18. A student wrote this paragraph about Dear. W.1.2b Revising a Brief Write (elaboration: developing a topic) -Target 3b Dear has to get some food. She has to go far away from Snappy. Dear is sad. Which sentence would best finish the paragraph? A. Snappy said, “Don’t be sad.” B. Dear took her egg and went to find food. C. Dear will not get food. D. Snappy will help find food. \`\`

31 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond The Adelie penguin is very small. Language and Vocabulary Which word could be used to replace small ? A.happy B.big C.fat D.little 20. Read the sentence below. Edit L. The Adelie penguin eats fish krill snow and even squid. Which is the correct way to write this sentence? A. The Adelie penguin eats fish, krill snow and even squid. B. The Adelie penguin eats fish krill, snow, and even squid. C. The Adelie penguin eats fish, krill, snow, and even squid. D. The Adelie penguin eats fish krill snow and even, squid.

32 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 32 Student Directions : Part 2 Your assignment: You are going to fly to Antarctica to see Snappy the penguin. When you come back you will write an article describing what you saw for other students to read at your school. 1.Plan your writing. You may use your notes and answers. 2.Write – Revise and Edit your first draft. 3.Write a final draft about what you saw on your trip to Antarctica. How you will be scored 1. Purpose: Did you write only about the topic? Organization: Do your ideas go together? Do they make sense? 2. Elaboration of Evidence: Did you show evidence to support your topic? Language and Vocabulary: Did you use words about the topic? Are your sentences easy to read and understand? 3. Conventions: Did you follow rules for capitals, punctuation and spelling?

33 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 33 Write your article here. Where did you go? What did you wear? What did you see? How did you feel? Draw what you want to show about your trip.

34 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 34 STOP Close your books and wait for instructions!

35 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 35 Informational Text 9 I can find information from different text features. RI I can find information from different text features and explain what it means. RI I can ask and answer who, what, when, why, and how questions about information in pictures and text. RI I know that information can be found in pictures and text. RI I can answer who, what, when, where and how describing questions about key ideas in a text (read and discussed). RI I can locate key ideas using details in illustrations. RI I can choose the right information from pictures and text to answer questions. RI I can ocate key ideas using details in the text. RI Literary Text 1 I can tell the difference between stories that are fiction and those that are non- fiction. RL I can explain why some texts are fiction stories and some are not. RL I can tell who is speaking in a story. RL I can find clues to tell when someone is speaking in a story RL I can find details to describe a character from illustrations and words. RL I can answer who, what, when, where and how questions about a story. RL I can find information to identify specifically who is telling a story. RL I can find and explain information using illustrations and words. L Color the box green if your answer was correct. Color the box red if your answer was not correct. Writing 17 Write a conclusion to the paragraph. W.1.2c (Brief Write) Which sentence would best finish the paragraph? W.1.2b 19 Which word could be used to replace small ? L.1.5d 20 Which is the correct way to write this sentence? L.1.2c

36 Rev. Control: 10/25/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 36 1 st minute Something I did well on…. 2nd Minute Something that was new to me or I need more practice with… 3 rd Minute Something I don’t understand…. Reflection Page


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