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New zealand birds online www.nzbirdsonline.org.nz Creating the perfect website for and by OSNZ members Colin Miskelly.

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Presentation on theme: "New zealand birds online www.nzbirdsonline.org.nz Creating the perfect website for and by OSNZ members Colin Miskelly."— Presentation transcript:

1 new zealand birds online Creating the perfect website for and by OSNZ members Colin Miskelly

2 new zealand birds online This presentation will cover: Current status of the website Mock-up of the final website to demonstrate intended search functions and content Progress to date How you can help

3 The current website uses Drupal branded software (blue & white). It is accessible by password only, for loading content to be used in the final website, which is demonstrated in the mock-up that follows. Note that the final website may look quite different to what you are about to see (green pages).

4 new zealand birds online Welcome to New Zealand birds online Search by bird name Search by conservation status Search by habitat Search by locality name Search by map t

5 new zealand birds online Welcome to New Zealand birds online Search by bird name Search by conservation status Search by habitat Search by locality name Search by map tu

6 new zealand birds online Welcome to New Zealand birds online Search by bird name Search by conservation status Search by habitat Search by locality name Search by map tuh

7 new zealand birds online Welcome to New Zealand birds online Search by bird name Search by conservation status Search by habitat Search by locality name Search by map tuhu

8 new zealand birds online Welcome to New Zealand birds online Search by bird name Search by conservation status Search by habitat Search by locality name Search by map tuhua

9 new zealand birds online Welcome to New Zealand birds online Search by bird name Search by conservation status Search by habitat Search by locality name Search by map Tuhua / Mayor Island Full list Breeding Regular (includes Breeding) Regular + Vagrant Vagrant Formerly present Extinct Extinct + Formerly present Arctic skua Australasian bittern Australasian gannet Bellbird Brown teal Buller’s shearwater Caspian tern Chaffinch Common starling Dunnock Eurasian blackbird European goldfinch European greenfinch Flesh-footed shearwater Fluttering shearwater Grey warbler Grey-faced petrel House sparrow Kaka Little penguin Little shag Mallard Print list Export list

10 new zealand birds online Welcome to New Zealand birds online Search by bird name Search by conservation status Search by habitat Search by locality name Search by map Threatened Nationally Critical Nationally Endangered Nationally Vulnerable At Risk Declining Recovering Relict Naturally Uncommon Not Threatened Coloniser Migrant Vagrant Data Deficient Introduced and Naturalised Extinct Extinct before AD1000 Extinct AD1000 to AD1800 Extinct since AD1800

11 new zealand birds online Welcome to New Zealand birds online Search by bird name Search by conservation status Search by habitat Search by locality name Search by map Amies’ penguin bird of unknown affinities Douglas' duck Duntroon penguin Enright’s duck Fleming’s rail Grebneff's penguin Harris’ penguin Huxley's penguin Johnstones’ duck Lee’s parrot Little St Bathans parrot Lopdells' penguin Lowe’s penguin Mannering’s penguin Manuherikia duck Marples’ penguin Maxwell's penguin Merton's parrot Minute Manuherikia duck Miocene diving petrel Miocene false-toothed pelican Print list Export list

12 new zealand birds online Welcome to New Zealand birds online Search by bird name Search by conservation status Search by habitat Search by locality name Search by map Open sea or dead on beach Coastal, harbour or estuary River, lake or wetland Urban park or garden Farmland or horticulture Forest (native or plantation) Mountain / alpine tops This feature hasn’t been developed yet, but will allow novice users to search for birds they wish to identify based on grids of photographs representing each family of birds that occurs in each habitat. By clicking on a family photo, they will be led to a second grid of photos of each member of that family that occurs in that habitat. Clicking on a species photo will lead them to the correct species page.

13 new zealand birds online Welcome to New Zealand birds online Search by bird name Search by conservation status Search by habitat Search by locality name Search by map f

14 new zealand birds online Welcome to New Zealand birds online Search by bird name Search by conservation status Search by habitat Search by locality name Search by map fa

15 new zealand birds online Welcome to New Zealand birds online Search by bird name Search by conservation status Search by habitat Search by locality name Search by map fai

16 new zealand birds online Welcome to New Zealand birds online Search by bird name Search by conservation status Search by habitat Search by locality name Search by map fair

17 new zealand birds online Welcome to New Zealand birds online Search by bird name Search by conservation status Search by habitat Search by locality name Search by map Fairy martin Fairy penguin Fairy prion Fairy tern fairy

18 Fairy prion Pachyptila turtur (Kuhl, 1820) Order Procellariiformes Family Procellariidae New Zealand status native breeder Conservation status Relict Other names tītī wainui, dove prion, kuaka (incorrectly), narrow-billed prion (incorrectly) Geographical variation No subspecies currently recognised. Southernmost populations previously referred to subspecies subantarctica new zealand birds online Fairy prion. Adult. Kundy Island. March Image © Colin Miskelly The fairy prion is an abundant and familiar petrel of exposed coastal waters around New Zealand, especially from Cook Strait southwards. It often feeds in large flocks over tide rips near offshore rocks and islands. Slightly smaller than a red- billed gull, fairy prions are very similar in appearance to the five other prion species: blue-grey and black above, and white below, with blue bill and legs. This colouration and their habit of flying along wave troughs make prions difficult to follow with binoculars from a moving boat deck. The Poor Knights Islands are the only northern breeding site, but fairy prions breed in burrows and rock crevices on many islands from Cook Strait south, including on the Chatham Islands and several subantarctic island groups. The largest colony holds an estimated 1.8 million pairs. Fairy prions, along with other prion species, are often found storm-wrecked on beaches exposed to the open ocean, especially on the west coast of both main islands. Identification 25 cm, 120 g All six prion species are all very similar in appearance and behaviour, differing mainly in bill shape. All are medium-small seabirds

19 Fairy prion Pachyptila turtur (Kuhl, 1820) Order Procellariiformes Family Procellariidae New Zealand status native breeder Conservation status Relict Other names tītī wainui, dove prion, kuaka (incorrectly), narrow-billed prion (incorrectly) Geographical variation No subspecies currently recognised. Southernmost populations previously referred to subspecies subantarctica new zealand birds online Fairy prion. Adult. Kundy Island. March Image © Colin Miskelly The fairy prion is an abundant and familiar petrel of exposed coastal waters around New Zealand, especially from Cook Strait southwards. It often feeds in large flocks over tide rips near offshore rocks and islands. Slightly smaller than a red- billed gull, fairy prions are very similar in appearance to the five other prion species: blue-grey and black above, and white below, with blue bill and legs. This colouration and their habit of flying along wave troughs make prions difficult to follow with binoculars from a moving boat deck. The Poor Knights Islands are the only northern breeding site, but fairy prions breed in burrows and rock crevices on many islands from Cook Strait south, including on the Chatham Islands and several subantarctic island groups. The largest colony holds an estimated 1.8 million pairs. Fairy prions, along with other prion species, are often found storm-wrecked on beaches exposed to the open ocean, especially on the west coast of both main islands. Identification 25 cm, 120 g All six prion species are all very similar in appearance and behaviour, differing mainly in bill shape. All are medium-small seabirds Antarctic prion Broad-billed prion Fairy prion Fulmar prion Salvin’s prion Thin-billed prion

20 Fairy prion Pachyptila turtur (Kuhl, 1820) Order Procellariiformes Family Procellariidae New Zealand status native breeder Conservation status Relict Other names tītī wainui, dove prion, kuaka (incorrectly), narrow-billed prion (incorrectly) Geographical variation No subspecies currently recognised. Southernmost populations previously referred to subspecies subantarctica new zealand birds online Fairy prion. Adult. Kundy Island. March Image © Colin Miskelly The fairy prion is an abundant and familiar petrel of exposed coastal waters around New Zealand, especially from Cook Strait southwards. It often feeds in large flocks over tide rips near offshore rocks and islands. Slightly smaller than a red- billed gull, fairy prions are very similar in appearance to the five other prion species: blue-grey and black above, and white below, with blue bill and legs. This colouration and their habit of flying along wave troughs make prions difficult to follow with binoculars from a moving boat deck. The Poor Knights Islands are the only northern breeding site, but fairy prions breed in burrows and rock crevices on many islands from Cook Strait south, including on the Chatham Islands and several subantarctic island groups. The largest colony holds an estimated 1.8 million pairs. Fairy prions, along with other prion species, are often found storm-wrecked on beaches exposed to the open ocean, especially on the west coast of both main islands. Identification 25 cm, 120 g All six prion species are all very similar in appearance and behaviour, differing mainly in bill shape. All are medium-small seabirds

21 Fairy prion Pachyptila turtur (Kuhl, 1820) Order Procellariiformes Family Procellariidae New Zealand status native breeder Conservation status Relict Other names tītī wainui, dove prion, kuaka (incorrectly), narrow-billed prion (incorrectly) Geographical variation No subspecies currently recognised. Southernmost populations previously referred to subspecies subantarctica new zealand birds online Fairy prion. Adult. Kundy Island. March Image © Colin Miskelly The fairy prion is an abundant and familiar petrel of exposed coastal waters around New Zealand, especially from Cook Strait southwards. It often feeds in large flocks over tide rips near offshore rocks and islands. Slightly smaller than a red- billed gull, fairy prions are very similar in appearance to the five other prion species: blue-grey and black above, and white below, with blue bill and legs. This colouration and their habit of flying along wave troughs make prions difficult to follow with binoculars from a moving boat deck. The Poor Knights Islands are the only northern breeding site, but fairy prions breed in burrows and rock crevices on many islands from Cook Strait south, including on the Chatham Islands and several subantarctic island groups. The largest colony holds an estimated 1.8 million pairs. Fairy prions, along with other prion species, are often found storm-wrecked on beaches exposed to the open ocean, especially on the west coast of both main islands. Identification 25 cm, 120 g All six prion species are all very similar in appearance and behaviour, differing mainly in bill shape. All are medium-small seabirds Pachyptila belcheri Pachyptila crassirostris Pachyptila desolata Pachyptila salvini Pachyptila turtur Pachyptila vittata

22 Fairy prion Pachyptila turtur (Kuhl, 1820) Order Procellariiformes Family Procellariidae New Zealand status native breeder Conservation status Relict Other names tītī wainui, dove prion, kuaka (incorrectly), narrow-billed prion (incorrectly) Geographical variation No subspecies currently recognised. Southernmost populations previously referred to subspecies subantarctica new zealand birds online Fairy prion. Adult. Kundy Island. March Image © Colin Miskelly The fairy prion is an abundant and familiar petrel of exposed coastal waters around New Zealand, especially from Cook Strait southwards. It often feeds in large flocks over tide rips near offshore rocks and islands. Slightly smaller than a red- billed gull, fairy prions are very similar in appearance to the five other prion species: blue-grey and black above, and white below, with blue bill and legs. This colouration and their habit of flying along wave troughs make prions difficult to follow with binoculars from a moving boat deck. The Poor Knights Islands are the only northern breeding site, but fairy prions breed in burrows and rock crevices on many islands from Cook Strait south, including on the Chatham Islands and several subantarctic island groups. The largest colony holds an estimated 1.8 million pairs. Fairy prions, along with other prion species, are often found storm-wrecked on beaches exposed to the open ocean, especially on the west coast of both main islands. Identification 25 cm, 120 g All six prion species are all very similar in appearance and behaviour, differing mainly in bill shape. All are medium-small seabirds

23 Fairy prion Pachyptila turtur (Kuhl, 1820) Order Procellariiformes Family Procellariidae New Zealand status native breeder Conservation status Relict Other names tītī wainui, dove prion, kuaka (incorrectly), narrow-billed prion (incorrectly) Geographical variation No subspecies currently recognised. Southernmost populations previously referred to subspecies subantarctica new zealand birds online Fairy prion. Adult. Kundy Island. March Image © Colin Miskelly The fairy prion is an abundant and familiar petrel of exposed coastal waters around New Zealand, especially from Cook Strait southwards. It often feeds in large flocks over tide rips near offshore rocks and islands. Slightly smaller than a red- billed gull, fairy prions are very similar in appearance to the five other prion species: blue-grey and black above, and white below, with blue bill and legs. This colouration and their habit of flying along wave troughs make prions difficult to follow with binoculars from a moving boat deck. The Poor Knights Islands are the only northern breeding site, but fairy prions breed in burrows and rock crevices on many islands from Cook Strait south, including on the Chatham Islands and several subantarctic island groups. The largest colony holds an estimated 1.8 million pairs. Fairy prions, along with other prion species, are often found storm-wrecked on beaches exposed to the open ocean, especially on the west coast of both main islands. Identification 25 cm, 120 g All six prion species are all very similar in appearance and behaviour, differing mainly in bill shape. All are medium-small seabirds Cyanoramphus auriceps (Kuhl, 1820) Oceanites oceanicus (Kuhl, 1820) Pachyptila turtur (Kuhl, 1820)

24 Fairy prion Pachyptila turtur (Kuhl, 1820) Order Procellariiformes Family Procellariidae New Zealand status native breeder Conservation status Relict Other names tītī wainui, dove prion, kuaka (incorrectly), narrow-billed prion (incorrectly) Geographical variation No subspecies currently recognised. Southernmost populations previously referred to subspecies subantarctica new zealand birds online Fairy prion. Adult. Kundy Island. March Image © Colin Miskelly The fairy prion is an abundant and familiar petrel of exposed coastal waters around New Zealand, especially from Cook Strait southwards. It often feeds in large flocks over tide rips near offshore rocks and islands. Slightly smaller than a red- billed gull, fairy prions are very similar in appearance to the five other prion species: blue-grey and black above, and white below, with blue bill and legs. This colouration and their habit of flying along wave troughs make prions difficult to follow with binoculars from a moving boat deck. The Poor Knights Islands are the only northern breeding site, but fairy prions breed in burrows and rock crevices on many islands from Cook Strait south, including on the Chatham Islands and several subantarctic island groups. The largest colony holds an estimated 1.8 million pairs. Fairy prions, along with other prion species, are often found storm-wrecked on beaches exposed to the open ocean, especially on the west coast of both main islands. Identification 25 cm, 120 g All six prion species are all very similar in appearance and behaviour, differing mainly in bill shape. All are medium-small seabirds

25 Fairy prion Pachyptila turtur (Kuhl, 1820) Order Procellariiformes Family Procellariidae New Zealand status native breeder Conservation status Relict Other names tītī wainui, dove prion, kuaka (incorrectly), narrow-billed prion (incorrectly) Geographical variation No subspecies currently recognised. Southernmost populations previously referred to subspecies subantarctica new zealand birds online Fairy prion. Adult. Kundy Island. March Image © Colin Miskelly The fairy prion is an abundant and familiar petrel of exposed coastal waters around New Zealand, especially from Cook Strait southwards. It often feeds in large flocks over tide rips near offshore rocks and islands. Slightly smaller than a red- billed gull, fairy prions are very similar in appearance to the five other prion species: blue-grey and black above, and white below, with blue bill and legs. This colouration and their habit of flying along wave troughs make prions difficult to follow with binoculars from a moving boat deck. The Poor Knights Islands are the only northern breeding site, but fairy prions breed in burrows and rock crevices on many islands from Cook Strait south, including on the Chatham Islands and several subantarctic island groups. The largest colony holds an estimated 1.8 million pairs. Fairy prions, along with other prion species, are often found storm-wrecked on beaches exposed to the open ocean, especially on the west coast of both main islands. Identification 25 cm, 120 g All six prion species are all very similar in appearance and behaviour, differing mainly in bill shape. All are medium-small seabirds Broad-billed prion Cook’s petrel Fairy prion Fluttering shearwater Grey-backed storm petrel Kermadec petrel Marsh crake Mottled petrel Red-crowned parakeet Spotless crake Wedge-tailed shearwater White-faced storm petrel White-naped petrel

26 Fairy prion Pachyptila turtur (Kuhl, 1820) Order Procellariiformes Family Procellariidae New Zealand status native breeder Conservation status Relict Other names tītī wainui, dove prion, kuaka (incorrectly), narrow-billed prion (incorrectly) Geographical variation No subspecies currently recognised. Southernmost populations previously referred to subspecies subantarctica new zealand birds online Fairy prion. Adult. Kundy Island. March Image © Colin Miskelly The fairy prion is an abundant and familiar petrel of exposed coastal waters around New Zealand, especially from Cook Strait southwards. It often feeds in large flocks over tide rips near offshore rocks and islands. Slightly smaller than a red- billed gull, fairy prions are very similar in appearance to the five other prion species: blue-grey and black above, and white below, with blue bill and legs. This colouration and their habit of flying along wave troughs make prions difficult to follow with binoculars from a moving boat deck. The Poor Knights Islands are the only northern breeding site, but fairy prions breed in burrows and rock crevices on many islands from Cook Strait south, including on the Chatham Islands and several subantarctic island groups. The largest colony holds an estimated 1.8 million pairs. Fairy prions, along with other prion species, are often found storm-wrecked on beaches exposed to the open ocean, especially on the west coast of both main islands. Identification 25 cm, 120 g All six prion species are all very similar in appearance and behaviour, differing mainly in bill shape. All are medium-small seabirds

27 Fairy prion Pachyptila turtur (Kuhl, 1820) Order Procellariiformes Family Procellariidae New Zealand status native breeder Conservation status Relict Other names tītī wainui, dove prion, kuaka (incorrectly), narrow-billed prion (incorrectly) Geographical variation No subspecies currently recognised. Southernmost populations previously referred to subspecies subantarctica new zealand birds online Fairy prion. Adult. Kundy Island. March Image © Colin Miskelly The fairy prion is an abundant and familiar petrel of exposed coastal waters around New Zealand, especially from Cook Strait southwards. It often feeds in large flocks over tide rips near offshore rocks and islands. Slightly smaller than a red- billed gull, fairy prions are very similar in appearance to the five other prion species: blue-grey and black above, and white below, with blue bill and legs. This colouration and their habit of flying along wave troughs make prions difficult to follow with binoculars from a moving boat deck. The Poor Knights Islands are the only northern breeding site, but fairy prions breed in burrows and rock crevices on many islands from Cook Strait south, including on the Chatham Islands and several subantarctic island groups. The largest colony holds an estimated 1.8 million pairs. Fairy prions, along with other prion species, are often found storm-wrecked on beaches exposed to the open ocean, especially on the west coast of both main islands. Identification 25 cm, 120 g All six prion species are all very similar in appearance and behaviour, differing mainly in bill shape. All are medium-small seabirds Bar-tailed godwit Common diving petrel Fairy prion

28 Pachyptila turtur (Kuhl, 1820) Order Procellariiformes Family Procellariidae New Zealand status native breeder Conservation status Relict Other names tītī wainui, dove prion, kuaka (incorrectly), narrow-billed prion (incorrectly) Geographical variation No subspecies currently recognised. Southernmost populations previously referred to subspecies subantarctica new zealand birds online Fairy prion. Adult. Kundy Island. March Image © Colin Miskelly The fairy prion is an abundant and familiar petrel of exposed coastal waters around New Zealand, especially from Cook Strait southwards. It often feeds in large flocks over tide rips near offshore rocks and islands. Slightly smaller than a red- billed gull, fairy prions are very similar in appearance to the five other prion species: blue-grey and black above, and white below, with blue bill and legs. This colouration and their habit of flying along wave troughs make prions difficult to follow with binoculars from a moving boat deck. The Poor Knights Islands are the only northern breeding site, but fairy prions breed in burrows and rock crevices on many islands from Cook Strait south, including on the Chatham Islands and several subantarctic island groups. The largest colony holds an estimated 1.8 million pairs. Fairy prions, along with other prion species, are often found storm-wrecked on beaches exposed to the open ocean, especially on the west coast of both main islands. Identification 25 cm, 120 g All six prion species are all very similar in appearance and behaviour, differing mainly in bill shape. All are medium-small seabirds

29 new zealand birds online Population There may be as many as 5 million pairs of fairy prions in the New Zealand region. The largest population is on Stephens Island, with 1.83 million pairs estimated. Other large colonies include Mangere Island (c.40,000 pairs), and 1.5 million pairs were estimated on Green Island, Foveaux Strait in Fairy prions are the most common bird found dead on New Zealand beaches, at an average rate of 0.56 birds per km. Threats and conservation Fairy prions are likely to have bred on many coastal headlands before human arrival in New Zealand. Apart from on a few inaccessible cliff ledges on Otago Peninsula, fairy prions have since been extirpated from the mainland by introduced predators. Their main natural predators at their island breeding sites are subantarctic skuas and swamp harriers. Introductions of feral cats, weka or rats decimated or extirpated fairy prion populations on many muttonbird islands around Stewart Island. Few actions specifically targeted at conservation of fairy prions have been undertaken. These included translocation of 240 near fully-grown chicks from Stephens Island to Mana Island during in an attempt to establish a new population, and installation of nest boxes at a cliff-ledge colony on Otago Peninsula. Other more generic island restoration projects (especially pest mammal and weka eradications) have and will benefit fairy prion populations, including on Stephens Island, Mangere Island and on several muttonbird islands near Stewart Island. Breeding Fairy prions are colonial breeders, nesting in short burrows or rock crevices, mainly on small islands. The breeding season is earlier in the north, with peak laying of the single egg in mid-October at the Poor Knights, and early November on the Snares Islands. Incubation is shared and takes days. The chick is left unattended during daylight when only 1-5 days old. One or both parents visit most nights and feed the chick by regurgitation right through to fledging at days old. Young birds return to colonies when 2-3 years old, and first breed when 3-4 years old. Behaviour and ecology

30 new zealand birds online Fairy prions excavate their own burrows, or utilise caves and rock crevices. They breed as monogamous pairs, which typically remain together over many seasons. Fairy prions visit breeding sites after dark and depart before dawn, or stay in burrows or nest crevices during daylight. Food Fairy prions mainly eat small pelagic crustaceans, along with small fish and squid. The small krill species Nyctiphanes australis is by far the predominant species eaten in New Zealand, followed by pelagic amphipods and copepods. Websites References Craig, E.D Takapourewa titiwainui (fairy prion; Pachyptila turtur): how nest site selection affects breeding success, with applications for translocation. MSc thesis, University of Otago. Harper, P.C Breeding biology of the fairy prion (Pachyptila turtur) at the Poor Knights Islands, New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Zoology 3: Loh, G A mainland breeding population of fairy prions (Pachyptila turtur), South Island, New Zealand. Notornis 47: Marchant, S.; Higgins, P.J. (eds.), Handbook of Australian, New Zealand and Antarctic birds. Ratites to Ducks, vol. 1. Melbourne, Oxford University Press. Miskelly, C.M; Gummer, H. Submitted. Attempts to anchor pelagic fairy prions (Pachyptila turtur) to their release site on Mana Island. Miskelly, C.M.; Sagar, P.M.; Tennyson, A.J.D.; Scofield, R.P Birds of the Snares Islands, New Zealand. Notornis 48: Miskelly, C.M.; Taylor, G.A.; Gummer, H.; Williams, R Translocations of eight species of burrow-nesting seabirds (genera Pterodroma, Pelecanoides, Pachyptila and Puffinus: family Procellariidae). Biological

31 new zealand birds online Richdale, L.E The titi wainui or fairy prion Pachyptila turtur (Kuhl). Transactions of the Royal Society of New Zealand 74: Richdale, L.E Breeding behaviour of the narrow-billed prion and broad-billed prion on Whero Island, New Zealand. Transactions of the Zoological Society of London 31: Wilson, R.A Bird islands of New Zealand. Christchurch, Whitcombe & Tombs Ltd. Recommended citation: Miskelly, C.M Fairy prion. In Miskelly, C.M. (ed.) New Zealand Birds Online. Fairy prion, Adult Snares Islands, February 1984 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult at sea Hauraki Gulf, October 2009 Neil Fitzgerald Fairy prion, Adult Kundy Island, March 2011 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Chick Stephens Island, January 2002 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion Aorangi, Poor Knights Islands 30 October 1980 Paul & Joy Sagar ©

32 new zealand birds online Richdale, L.E The titi wainui or fairy prion Pachyptila turtur (Kuhl). Transactions of the Royal Society of New Zealand 74: Richdale, L.E Breeding behaviour of the narrow-billed prion and broad-billed prion on Whero Island, New Zealand. Transactions of the Zoological Society of London 31: Wilson, R.A Bird islands of New Zealand. Christchurch, Whitcombe & Tombs Ltd. Recommended citation: Miskelly, C.M Fairy prion. In Miskelly, C.M. (ed.) New Zealand Birds Online. Fairy prion, Adult Snares Islands, February 1984 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult at sea Hauraki Gulf, October 2009 Neil Fitzgerald Fairy prion, Adult Kundy Island, March 2011 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Chick Stephens Island, January 2002 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion Aorangi, Poor Knights Islands 30 October 1980 Paul & Joy Sagar ©

33 Fairy prion, Chick Stephens Island, January 2002 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Chick Stephens Island, January 2002 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Chick Stephens Island, January 2002 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Chick Stephens Island, January 2002 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult Snares slands, February 1984 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult pair Mangere sland, 1981 Dave Crouchley, DOC Fairy prion, Adult Kundy Island, March 2011 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Chick Stephens Island, January 2002 Colin Miskelly new zealand birds online Richdale, L.E The titi wainui or fairy prion Pachyptila turtur (Kuhl). Transactions of the Royal Society of New Zealand 74: Richdale, L.E Breeding behaviour of the narrow-billed prion and broad-billed prion on Whero Island, New Zealand. Transactions of the Zoological Society of London 31: Wilson, R.A Bird islands of New Zealand. Christchurch, Whitcombe & Tombs Ltd. Recommended citation: Miskelly, C.M Fairy prion. In Miskelly, C.M. (ed.) New Zealand Birds Online. Fairy prion, Adult Kundy Island, March 2011 Photographer: Colin Miskelly © Colin Miskelly

34 new zealand birds online Richdale, L.E The titi wainui or fairy prion Pachyptila turtur (Kuhl). Transactions of the Royal Society of New Zealand 74: Richdale, L.E Breeding behaviour of the narrow-billed prion and broad-billed prion on Whero Island, New Zealand. Transactions of the Zoological Society of London 31: Wilson, R.A Bird islands of New Zealand. Christchurch, Whitcombe & Tombs Ltd. Recommended citation: Miskelly, C.M Fairy prion. In Miskelly, C.M. (ed.) New Zealand Birds Online. Fairy prion, Adult Snares Islands, February 1984 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult at sea Hauraki Gulf, October 2009 Neil Fitzgerald Fairy prion, Adult Kundy Island, March 2011 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Chick Stephens Island, January 2002 Colin Miskelly

35 new zealand birds online Breeding ecology News Fairy prion, Adult Mangere Island, November 1982 DOC Fairy prion, Adult Kundy Island, March 2011 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult at sea Hauraki Gulf, October 2009 Neil Fitzgerald Fairy prion, Fledgling Mana Island, January 2002 Rex Williams Fairy prion, Adult Stephens Island, January 2002 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult Kundy Island, March 2011 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult Stephens Island, January 2002 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult Kundy Island, March 2011 Colin Miskelly

36 new zealand birds online Breeding ecology News Fairy prion, Adult Mangere Island, November 1982 DOC Fairy prion, Adult Kundy Island, March 2011 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult at sea Hauraki Gulf, October 2009 Neil Fitzgerald Fairy prion, Fledgling Mana Island, January 2002 Rex Williams Fairy prion, Adult Stephens Island, January 2002 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult Kundy Island, March 2011 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult Stephens Island, January 2002 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult Kundy Island, March 2011 Colin Miskelly

37 new zealand birds online Breeding ecology News Fairy prion, Adult Mangere Island, November 1982 DOC Fairy prion, Adult Kundy Island, March 2011 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult at sea Hauraki Gulf, October 2009 Neil Fitzgerald Fairy prion, Fledgling Mana Island, January 2002 Rex Williams Fairy prion, Adult Stephens Island, January 2002 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult Kundy Island, March 2011 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult Stephens Island, January 2002 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult Kundy Island, March 2011 Colin Miskelly

38 new zealand birds online Breeding ecology News Fairy prion, Adult Mangere Island, November 1982 DOC Fairy prion, Adult Kundy Island, March 2011 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult at sea Hauraki Gulf, October 2009 Neil Fitzgerald Fairy prion, Fledgling Mana Island, January 2002 Rex Williams Fairy prion, Adult Stephens Island, January 2002 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult Kundy Island, March 2011 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult Stephens Island, January 2002 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult Kundy Island, March 2011 Colin Miskelly

39 new zealand birds online Fairy prion Pachyptila turtur breeding and demography Social structureMonogamousMaximum number of successful broods per year 1 Breeding season Laying dates Nest type Burrow or rock creviceNest height 0 metres Nest construction Shallow scrape usually lined with a small quantity of grass or leaves Clutch size 1Egg colour & markings White, unmarked Mean egg dimensions 44 x 32 mmRange x mm Interval between eggs N/A daysIncubation behaviour Shared Incubation length daysNestling typeSemi-precocial Nestling period43-56 daysAge at fledging43-56 days Age at independence daysAge at first breeding3+ years Maximum longevity 22 yearsMaximum dispersal2100 km JFMAMJJASOND JFMAMJJASOND

40 new zealand birds online Breeding ecology News Fairy prion, Adult Mangere Island, November 1982 DOC Fairy prion, Adult Kundy Island, March 2011 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult at sea Hauraki Gulf, October 2009 Neil Fitzgerald Fairy prion, Fledgling Mana Island, January 2002 Rex Williams Fairy prion, Adult Stephens Island, January 2002 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult Kundy Island, March 2011 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult Stephens Island, January 2002 Colin Miskelly Fairy prion, Adult Kundy Island, March 2011 Colin Miskelly

41 new zealand birds online Fairy prion Pachyptila turtur News Translocated fairy prions breeding on Mana Island13 January 2012 Four fair prion chicks were banded on Mana Island in January These were the offspring of chicks translocated from Stephens Island between 2002 and Thousands of fairy prions killed during winter storm18 July 2011 Hundreds of thousands of prions were killed during a severe storm in July The wreck was dominated by broad-billed prions, but all six prion species were affected.

42 new zealand birds online Creating the perfect website for and by OSNZ members How you can help!

43 new zealand birds online OSNZ members and other members of the New Zealand birding community can contribute: Photographs Sound files Bird lists from your favourite birding sites Species texts

44 Demonstration of the process for loading photographs once you have been given a username and password

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47 new zealand birds online Species texts are required for 457 species 67 species texts have been received 194 further texts have been assigned to authors 196 species have yet to assigned to authors

48 What species texts could YOU write?... California quail fantail song thrush coot Arctic skua reef heron skylark Caspian tern turnstone spotted shag welcome swallow white-faced heron pheasant silvereye royal spoonbill myna spur-winged plover pied stilt subantarctic skua brown quail sooty shearwater spotted dove little shearwater curlew cattle egret mottled petrel little tern rook white heron little owl king penguin northern giant petrel little black shag white-faced storm petrel sharp-tailed sandpiper kookaburra golden plover blackbird black-fronted dotterel mute swan chukor Antarctic fulmar marsh crake new zealand birds online

49 or maybe a vagrant species?... gull-billed tern nankeen kestrel Gould’s petrel oriental cuckoo chestnut teal white-throated needletail marsh sandpiper streaked shearwater red-necked phalarope little egret ruff Australian reed warbler semi-palmated plover glossy ibis white-eyed duck black-faced cuckoo-shrike whiskered tern broad-billed sandpiper chestnut-breasted shelduck tree martin brown booby satin flycatcher pectoral sandpiper black kite fairy martin dunlin wood duck white ibis little whimbrel sanderling willie wagtail pink-eared duck darter white-browed woodswallow black-tailed native-hen new zealand birds online


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