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Commission on Professionals in Science and Technology Mentoring Program Models Lisa M. Frehill, Ph.D. Executive Director.

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Presentation on theme: "Commission on Professionals in Science and Technology Mentoring Program Models Lisa M. Frehill, Ph.D. Executive Director."— Presentation transcript:

1 Commission on Professionals in Science and Technology Mentoring Program Models Lisa M. Frehill, Ph.D. Executive Director

2 Your workforce data source. Different kinds of institutions have received awards & taken approaches consistent with institutional culture & structure ( 1 Round 1; 2 Round 2; Round 3) U California, Irvine 1 U California, Irvine 1 U Colorado 1 U Colorado 1 U Michigan 1 U Michigan 1 U Washington 1 U Washington 1 U Wisconsin 1 U Wisconsin 1 U Arizona U Arizona Georgia Tech 1 Georgia Tech 1 Virginia Tech 2 Virginia Tech 2 Rensellear Rensellear New Jersey Institute of Tech New Jersey Institute of Tech California Polytech, Pomona California Polytech, Pomona Brown Brown Case Western Reserve 2 Case Western Reserve 2 Columbia 2 Columbia 2 Cornell Cornell Duke Duke Rice Rice U Alabama, Birmingham 2 U Alabama, Birmingham 2 Iowa State Iowa State Kansas State 2 Kansas State 2 Marshall U Marshall U New Mexico State 1 New Mexico State 1 North Carolina State North Carolina State U Rhode Island 2 U Rhode Island 2 Utah State 2 Utah State 2 CUNY/Hunter College 1 CUNY/Hunter College 1 U Illinois, Chicago U Illinois, Chicago U Maryland, Baltimore County 2 U Maryland, Baltimore County 2 U Maryland, Eastern Shore U Maryland, Eastern Shore U Montana 2 U Montana 2 U Puerto Rico, Humacao 1 U Puerto Rico, Humacao 1 U Texas at El Paso 2 U Texas at El Paso 2 ADVANCE PI Meeting May 2006 Arlington, VA

3 Your workforce data source. Mentoring vs. Advisement Instrumental features Instrumental features –Career advice –Assistance with navigating the institution –Someone to ask as hoc questions –Connection to a research colleague Psychosocial features Psychosocial features –A sense of “we” – shared community –Someone cares –“Giving back” –Family/friend – type of feeling

4 Your workforce data source. Why Mentoring? Junior faculty Junior faculty –Learn the ropes –Gain access to senior faculty and resources –Become embedded in a community Senior faculty Senior faculty –“Give back” –Satisfaction from helping a young scholar –Re-invigorate research –Gain access to more cutting edge ideas, procedures, etc. – connection to the new generation of scholars.

5 Your workforce data source. New Faculty Often DO understand the research process. Often DO understand the research process. –Should be asked to work with senior faculty on grants as Co-pi’s. –Senior faculty should consider asking junior faculty to collaborate on research as appropriate. Often DO NOT understand the service component of our jobs. Often DO NOT understand the service component of our jobs. May need some help adjusting to the institution for teaching, even if an experienced teacher. May need some help adjusting to the institution for teaching, even if an experienced teacher.

6 Your workforce data source. Mentoring is a Key Transformative Strategy—Structure & Culture Structure : Structure : –Encourages development of ties. –Increase density of social networks. Culture : Culture : –Positive past experiences with mentoring. –It doesn’t “look” like a gender-based approach –Reciprocity, collaboration, and flatness mentoring styles –Reciprocity, collaboration, and flatness possible mentoring styles – – nurturing vs. competitive –Relationships – nurturing vs. competitive

7 Your workforce data source. Advisement UCI: Schools of Social Ecology and Humanities: New Faculty Orientation and Handbook. UCI: Schools of Social Ecology and Humanities: New Faculty Orientation and Handbook. UCI: Schools of Biological Sciences, Medicine and Computer Science: Advisory Boards Model. UCI: Schools of Biological Sciences, Medicine and Computer Science: Advisory Boards Model.

8 Your workforce data source. New Faculty Orientations and Handbooks Increasingly popular Increasingly popular Increased pressure to generate research $ Increased pressure to generate research $ Accountability issues  increased bureaucracy Accountability issues  increased bureaucracy Non-transparent resource allocations processes Non-transparent resource allocations processes –negotiation –“old boys networks” Community building capability – depends upon program structure Community building capability – depends upon program structure Almost entirely “instrumental” Almost entirely “instrumental”

9 Your workforce data source. Advisory Boards Internal to a unit (e.g., a college or school). Internal to a unit (e.g., a college or school). Senior faculty – recruited to serve on panels. Senior faculty – recruited to serve on panels. Junior faculty – recruited (usually request a board). Junior faculty – recruited (usually request a board). 1 x / year. 1 x / year. 30 – 60 minutes. 30 – 60 minutes. Oral review of the vita. Oral review of the vita. Almost completely instrumental. Almost completely instrumental.

10 Your workforce data source. Formal Mentoring Models Partner Models (e.g., Women’s Programs at UWashington and UWisconsin) Partner Models (e.g., Women’s Programs at UWashington and UWisconsin) Multiple Mentoring Model (NMSU) Multiple Mentoring Model (NMSU) Group Mentoring (UTEP) Group Mentoring (UTEP) Remote mentoring Remote mentoring –MentorNet: E-mentoring. –UMBC –Association for Women in Mathematics

11 Your workforce data source. Common Features Matching process Matching process –Staff person w/excellent communications skills –Active recruitment of mentors –Involvement of “key informants” Training for both mentors and mentees Training for both mentors and mentees –Mentors  Proactive Mechanisms – encourage interaction/follow-up Mechanisms – encourage interaction/follow-up Mentoring agreements Mentoring agreements Evaluation and assessment Evaluation and assessment Instrumental AND psychosocial features Instrumental AND psychosocial features

12 Your workforce data source. Partner Models One mentor is paired with one mentee. One mentor is paired with one mentee. Women’s Programs and Women’s Centers pioneered. Women’s Programs and Women’s Centers pioneered. Low budget Low budget –Not enough staff –Lack of follow-up and assessment –Sometimes no training for participants Without group activities & assessment, effectiveness questionable. Without group activities & assessment, effectiveness questionable.

13 Your workforce data source. Remote Mentoring MentorNet Institutions join (www.mentornet.net) Institutions join (www.mentornet.net)www.mentornet.net Individuals in the institutions request a mentor or volunteer to be a mentor. Individuals in the institutions request a mentor or volunteer to be a mentor. –Women –Under represented minorities. Pairings. Pairings. All mentoring is done via . All mentoring is done via . Training: scenarios, optional. Training: scenarios, optional. Bi-weekly discussion topics to encourage mentors and proteges to communicate regularly. Bi-weekly discussion topics to encourage mentors and proteges to communicate regularly. Strong assessment and research. Strong assessment and research. WEPAN 2007 conference paper (www.wepan.org). WEPAN 2007 conference paper (www.wepan.org).

14 Your workforce data source. Group Mentoring (University of Texas at El Paso) Pre-ADVANCE: Women’s Studies Program. Pre-ADVANCE: Women’s Studies Program. Annual assessment. Annual assessment. Two senior faculty grouped with 3-4 junior faculty. Two senior faculty grouped with 3-4 junior faculty. Provides context for peer-mentoring Provides context for peer-mentoring –Mentors. –Proteges. Only women. Only women.

15 Your workforce data source. Multiple Mentoring Model (New Mexico State University) Pairings Pairings –All new faculty in STEM – males and females –Cross-department –Intense communications and info gathering –PI/PD, Associate PD, and small group of faculty form pairs via discussion. –Within college when possible, but not essential. –Attempt to prioritize potential research compatability.

16 Your workforce data source. Multiple Mentoring Model Events – 1-2 per semester to permit peer- mentoring. Events – 1-2 per semester to permit peer- mentoring. Training Training –Mentors –Mentees Departmental mentoring programs encouraged/supported Departmental mentoring programs encouraged/supported –Provide a within-department mentor for all junior faculty. Denser social networks lead to more connections all-around. Denser social networks lead to more connections all-around.

17 Your workforce data source. (1) Connect mentees to mentors who are more central and have denser social networks Mentor Mentor’s community contacts Institutional Information & resources Mentor’s colleagues Mentee

18 Your workforce data source. (2) On-campus on-going events C reate a larger community of mentors and mentees. Social Networking

19 Your workforce data source. Multiple Mentoring Make mentoring normative Make mentoring normative –Practice: paired ALL new STEM faculty with mentors outside their department. –Invite senior faculty and administrators to participate –Incorporated mentoring into leadership development programming Encourage interactions Encourage interactions –Practice: pairs complete agreements –Practice: facilitated group interactions  luncheons, assigned seating, table topics—not always with speaker  mixers, dinners, picnics, open houses Training: mentors Training: mentors –Share best practices and hints –Increases connections among people with a positive orientation to mentoring –Encourage non-hierarchical practices –Gender and ethnic equity issues

20 Your workforce data source. Findings from NMSU Climate Survey: Evidence of Mentoring Impact Participants versus Non-Participants Non-participant male = 126 Non-Participant female = 66 Participant male = 23 and Participant female = 42 - Gender differences for faculty overall - Gender differences for non-participants - No gender differences for participants

21 Your workforce data source. Mid-Career Retention Ensure equity in job assignments and rewards for job performance. Ensure equity in job assignments and rewards for job performance. Create a collegial work environment. Create a collegial work environment. Provide opportunities to obtain seed money for new professional directions. Provide opportunities to obtain seed money for new professional directions. Accommodate family and health needs. Accommodate family and health needs. Encourage leadership. Encourage leadership.  Endorse women and minorities as leaders. Ensure competitive salaries. Ensure competitive salaries.

22 Your workforce data source. Some helpful hints Types of mentoring Types of mentoring –Career advisement –Psychosocial aspects –Advocacy –Mentor make contacts initially Matching—not an exact process Matching—not an exact process Communications: Communications: –Articulate expectations –Clear about what you are getting out of the relationship

23 Your workforce data source. Teaching Identify a “master teacher” in your department to partner with new faculty members. Identify a “master teacher” in your department to partner with new faculty members. Encourage new faculty to meet with faculty from other departments to “vent” and share ideas. Encourage new faculty to meet with faculty from other departments to “vent” and share ideas. Protect new faculty from excess work as thesis and dissertation advisors. Protect new faculty from excess work as thesis and dissertation advisors. Encourage new faculty to take advantage of institutional resources, like the Teaching Academy at NMSU. Encourage new faculty to take advantage of institutional resources, like the Teaching Academy at NMSU. –Not “remedial” – improving skills is normative. –Give credit to those who attend programming to improve teaching skills.

24 Your workforce data source. Service Importance and role of “service” within the university, college and department. Importance and role of “service” within the university, college and department. Assist junior faculty in making wise decisions regarding service—know when to ask senior faculty to step up to the plate. Assist junior faculty in making wise decisions regarding service—know when to ask senior faculty to step up to the plate. Minority and women faculty are asked to do more “service” than non-minority and male faculty Minority and women faculty are asked to do more “service” than non-minority and male faculty

25 Your workforce data source. Why do minority and women faculty get asked to do more service? Committees have to have “diverse composition” Committees have to have “diverse composition” Junior faculty are asked because they are likely to say “yes” Junior faculty are asked because they are likely to say “yes” Junior faculty are asked so that they can be integrated into the university community. Junior faculty are asked so that they can be integrated into the university community. Community: minority faculty are likely to be expected to serve as role models in the community AND minority faculty (especially African Americans) are likely to WANT to “give back” to the community. Community: minority faculty are likely to be expected to serve as role models in the community AND minority faculty (especially African Americans) are likely to WANT to “give back” to the community.

26 Your workforce data source. Lisa M. Frehill, Ph.D.Nathan Bell Executive DirectorAssociate Director Nicole Di Fabio Research Assistant 1200 New York Avenue Suite 113 Washington, DC Phone: Fax:


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