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District and State Considerations for Incorporating Expanded Learning into Competency-Based Systems July 29 th, #aypfevents.

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Presentation on theme: "District and State Considerations for Incorporating Expanded Learning into Competency-Based Systems July 29 th, #aypfevents."— Presentation transcript:

1 District and State Considerations for Incorporating Expanded Learning into Competency-Based Systems July 29 th, #aypfevents

2 Webinar Technical Support GoToWebinar Technical Assistance: To submit live questions, please use the “Questions” box A recording of the webinar and other resources will be available at

3 What do we mean by competency-based education? Students advance upon mastery. Competencies include explicit, measurable, transferable learning objectives that empower students. Assessment is meaningful and a positive learning experience for students. Students receive timely, differentiated support based on their individual learning needs. Learning outcomes emphasize competencies that include application and creation of knowledge, along with the development of important skills and dispositions. - Competency Works Definition

4 Why should we promote competency-based partnerships between schools and expanded learning? Why should K-12 stakeholders interested in competency-based education care about such partnerships? Schools often cannot provide students with diverse learning experiences and opportunities for learning in context. Expanded learning opportunities allows students more flexibility to progress toward mastery Why should expanded learning stakeholders care? Competency-based education allows schools to validate learning happening in non-formal settings

5 Presenters: Stephanie Krauss, Senior Fellow, Forum for Youth Investment Kate Nielson, Senior Policy Analyst, National Governors Association Sharon Lee, Director, Office of Multiple Pathways, Rhode Island Department of Education Michelle Un, Project Manager, Research & Data, Rhode Island After School Plus #aypfevents

6 ® Priority Products & Services May 2011 Cultivating Competence: The Quest for Readiness Stephanie Krauss, Senior Fellow

7 “Producing sonorous rhetoric about solving social problems through education is easier than carrying out fundamental social change through schooling.” -David Tyack, Tinkering Toward Utopia “My education & experience taught me to navigate the landscape of traditional schooling, but they were clearly inadequate for creating a generative new landscape for deep and integral learning. - Stephanie Marshall, The Power to Transform

8 Learning from experience. Falling forward from failure: 1. We were reactive when we needed to be generative 2. We needed different professional skills and capacity 3. We needed more guaranteed flexibility 4. We didn’t have enough time

9 Youth at the Center. Get youth ready by cultivating competence. Diffuse & expand. Anytime, anywhere.

10 Can we cultivate competence using a collective impact approach?

11 Considerations for collective impact efforts that are readiness-oriented & competency-based

12 Stephanie Krauss, Senior Fellow The Forum for Youth Investment Where do we go from here? The Readiness Project

13 July 29, 2014 Kate Nielson Senior Policy Analyst, National Governors Association Competency-Based Education: Implications for State Policy

14 State Trends Abolish Carnegie Unit, provide waivers School- and district-level innovation Limited changes to funding systems Growing interest and overlap with other policy areas –Common Core State Standards and assessments –Dual-enrollment –College and career readiness –Preparedness and remediation 14

15 15

16 Big Challenges Role of the educator Assessment and accountability Funding Communications and the culture shift 16

17 Role of the Educator Training (pre-service, in-service) Certification Evaluation Pay/promotion ELO Implications –Blurred lines between classroom and afterschool educators 17

18 Assessments and Accountability High quality, valid, consistent assessments Multiple formats of assessment Flexible schedules Appropriately tailored accountability ELO Implications –Assessments and credit beyond the classroom 18

19 Funding Still based on seat-time New system could incentivize CBE Largely funding the transition, but no new funding models ELO Implications –Funding opportunities and learning, wherever it occurs 19

20 Communications and the Culture Shift Entrenched vision of education Change the traditional vision of classroom learning, include outside opportunities 20

21 Questions? Kate Nielson Senior Policy Analyst National Governors Association 21

22 Question and Answer Stephanie Krauss, Senior Fellow, Forum for Youth Investment, Kate Nielson, Senior Policy Analyst, National Governors Association,

23 Sharon Lee, Director of the Office of Multiple Pathways, RIDE The SEA’s role in promoting proficiency- based expanded learning through legislative changes and state-level policies

24 Adult, Career and Technical, Secondary and Virtual Learning regulations support and promote learner proficiency gained and measured through a variety of learning opportunities. Comprehensive Regulatory Framework

25 RI regulations require districts to set up a proficiency- based diploma system to support students demonstrating proficiency through multiple measures. Multiple Measures of Proficiency

26 Partnering with a number of local, regional and national partners to develop a statewide proficiency-based system. Partnerships

27 Continued work… Build system with partnerships Maintain a comprehensive and connected system Pay attention to barriers and opportunities Support, highlight, and share good practices

28 Rethinking High School Credit ELOs for Credit: A Solution to Engage and Prepare Rhode Island Youth for the Future

29 AN EDUCATION INITIATIVE OF ELOs for Credit Student – At the center of learning Teacher – Facilitator of learning and rigor Industry Mentor– Guides hands- on, real world learning ELO Coordinator Opportunities for students to gain credit for rigorous learning experiences that take place outside of the traditional classroom

30 AN EDUCATION INITIATIVE OF Building the Initiative Plannin g Pilot Implementatio n Expansi on Providence Woonsocket Central Falls Establishing policy and processes to support districts Defining roles of teachers and partners Developing assessment to fit school and partner needs Expand to serve more students—funding capacity

31 AN EDUCATION INITIATIVE OF Central Falls Individual and group ELOs take place after-school, during the summer, and now during the school day A part of the school transformation strategy to increase the graduation rate and improve climate and culture  CFHS Transformation Report (2013) cited ELOs as integral to increasing graduation rate by 18% from 2010 to 2012 CFHS Transformation Report (2013) ELO Office funded by the district

32 AN EDUCATION INITIATIVE OF Excerpts and photos from the CFHS ELO Yearbook 2014

33 AN EDUCATION INITIATIVE OF Woonsocket Partnership with Riverzedge ArtsRiverzedge Arts Group and Individual ELOs take place after school and during the summer ELO Director at the school In , over 138 WHS and WACTC students completed 146 ELOs projects, engaging 25 teachers and 75 community mentors

34 AN EDUCATION INITIATIVE OF Source: Photos from ELO Woonsocket

35 AN EDUCATION INITIATIVE OF Going to Scale 4 new districts and 2 charter schools Different districts, different models Professional Learning Community

36 AN EDUCATION INITIATIVE OF Second Cohort District Models Personalized learning for unique student needs Fulfill digital portfolio requirement Expand course offerings Burrillville Support transition from middle school to high school Tie multiple expanded learning efforts together Expand STEM offerings Westerly Create interdisciplinary learning experiences Enhance afterschool offerings, increase partnerships Incorporated experiential learning into the school day Cumberland ELOs a part of the graduation requirement for students Map directly to 21 st century skill expectations Expands course offerings, tapping into interests of teachers Highlander

37 AN EDUCATION INITIATIVE OF District Conditions Needed to Support ELOs District administration involved in ELO design School leadership and openness around how school design can support ELOs and student- centered learning ELO Coordinator, or someone who can play a coordinating role Funding to support mentor and teacher compensation

38 AN EDUCATION INITIATIVE OF Next Steps for RIASPA Supporting statewide community partners working across multiple districts Formalize partnerships with higher education Develop more industry work-based experiences Digital badges!

39 AN EDUCATION INITIATIVE OF Check Us Out RIASPA: Woonsocket: Central Falls: opportunities.html opportunities.html Providence (PASA’s the Hub):

40 AN EDUCATION INITIATIVE OF For More Information Contact Info: Michelle Un

41 Question and Answer Stephanie Krauss, Senior Fellow, Forum for Youth Investment, Kate Nielson, Senior Policy Analyst, National Governors Association, Sharon Lee, Director, Office of Multiple Pathways, Rhode Island Department of Education, Michelle Un, Project Manager, Research & Data, Rhode Island After School Plus Alliance,

42 Thanks for joining us!


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