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Rhode Island Model Academy for Personnel Evaluating Teachers

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Presentation on theme: "Rhode Island Model Academy for Personnel Evaluating Teachers"— Presentation transcript:

1 Rhode Island Model Academy for Personnel Evaluating Teachers
Day 2: Professional Practice, Professional Foundations, and EPSS The contents of this training were developed under a Race to the Top grant from the Department of Education. However, those contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.

2 Professional Foundations and Support & Development
Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Session 1: Updates and Refining Professional Practice Objectives Evaluators will: Understand the updates to Professional Practice Understand layout and functionality of online tools Review different ways to take notes Practice observation calibration protocol

3 Checking In/ Do Now: Review the quote on p. 2 of your packet. Discuss with a colleague one way you plan to improve your feedback. Encourage participants to review quote in their packet and talk with a colleague Ask for a few thoughts on this Let participants know that today they should be able to walk away with some concrete next steps on how they can improve their feedback this year GATHER & SORT INTERPRET DEVELOP FEEDBACK DELIVER FEEDBACK

4 NEXT STEPS AS AN INSTRUCTIONAL LEADER
Rhode Island Model Learner Instructional Leader BIG IDEAS DETAILS / QUESTIONS NEXT STEPS AS A LEARNER NEXT STEPS AS AN INSTRUCTIONAL LEADER Today we will focus on Rhode Island Model specifics but again are looking to refine our skills Questions regarding local implementation are not the focus In your participant packet you will find a graphic organizer Explain the note taking template Ask participants to consider other big ideas and to capture any other key messages that they would like to communicate to their staff

5 Updates to Rhode Island Model for Teachers
Differentiated the number of observations and conferences by effectiveness levels Stronger focus on accuracy and quality feedback Similar to last year, RIDE incorporated feedback from the field to improve the model The differentiated process reduces the minimum (and districts and school leaders can do more if they think that is appropriate) Remember that the focus on observations is to accurately score teacher practice (based on the rubric as well as provide teachers with another perspective of their practice) Consider asking the group rhetorically how helpful feedback from another educator could be p. 5

6 Updates to Professional Practice
Reduction of required fields within EPSS Rationale is required for each Domain (2 total text fields) There is one text field for Priority Feedback Another piece of feedback that RIDE rec’d was around EPSS Based on focus groups we decided to consolidate rationale fields Again, though things might be consolidated, evaluators should consider what educators need to better support the students in their classrooms

7 Updates to Professional Practice
Updated Professional Practice Rubric Language of instruction more closely aligned to Common Core Improvements consistent in all resources FFTPS Module “Understanding the 2013 Edition” further clarifies alignment Name / highlight slight modifications to 2013 rubric (aligned to Common Core) Assure participants that this will be more helpful as we fully transition to the Common Core and that this does not impact scoring Suggest that evaluators log onto the FFTPS system to take a look at the videos that clarify the improvement “Framework for Teaching Evaluation Instrument 2013 Edition” Charlotte Danielson walks through the adjustments and the adjustments simply provide more clarity and language of instruction that is up to date Communicate that all relevant documents have been updated to reflect this change (including the rubrics – paper copies and online versions, EPSS)

8 Updates to Professional Practice
Differentiation the number of observations Updated Professional Practice Rubric to align to Common Core Reduction of required fields within EPSS How do you plan to message Professional Practice improvements to the educators that you work with? Read the 3 updates Ask them to consider how they might message this to their staff Ask them to consider how they might exceed the minimum requirements Participant Packet: Page 3

9 Online Tools for Professional Practice
Was there a component that you feel your teachers could collectively work on? If so, which one? NEXT STEPS AS AN INSTRUCTIONAL LEADER Ask the group if they noticed there was a consistent area of need for their teachers Did they see that there were any trends by component? Ask that they stop and jot any ideas or next steps about this section Participant Packet: Page 3

10 Refining Observation: Note-Taking
Note what you see and hear related to Professional Practice components: Bullet statements Lesson does not have to be scripted Only evidence should be recorded (Remain self-aware to avoid opinion, interpretation, or bias) Quick refresher on evidence, note taking, and calibration Reiterate that we are all learners and can find ways to improve Calibration is never fully ‘achieved’; it is an ongoing process; As we continue to work with this rubric and process, we will continue to build our shared language of instruction Notes and evidence of observation should include what you see and hear Suggest that observers try taking notes a little differently (if they have had a hard time – sometimes we have to re-train ourselves to work differently and that can be difficult)

11 Refining Observation: Note-Taking
3 Types of Observed Evidence of Practice Words spoken by the teacher and students Ex. “Can anyone think of another idea?” Actions by teacher and students Ex. “The students took 45 seconds to line up by the door.” The appearance of the classroom Ex. “The objective for the class was written on the board.” Read examples Note that since we are constantly building our familiarity with the rubric and that shared language of instruction, we might start gathering and sorting at the same time (Has anyone gone into their observations with lens of the components?) Note that despite our familiarity with the rubric and with our teachers, it is critical that we stay true to this process by providing teachers with accurate information about their practice as well as feedback that helps them improve; We are serving as another set of eyes to help educators improve their work with their students; GATHER & SORT INTERPRET DEVELOP FEEDBACK DELIVER FEEDBACK

12 Whole Group Conversation
Calibration Protocol Step 1: Watch video and take notes Step 2: Independently interpret and score evidence Step 3: Score observation as a small group Step 4: Whole group discussion about scores and rationale Mock Observation Independent Scoring Group Scoring Whole Group Conversation Clarify that calibration is an ongoing process Pass out Observation Calibration Protocol Note that there is often a difference between observers’ ability to do this with video and in-person (application in real life) Teachers and students rely on their instructional leadership to provide accurate feedback VIDEO ACCESS: Website: training2.teachscape.com Username: RIDEtester01 Password: learn Video: Scoring Practice; Last video (S-53) (HS Literacy lesson; female teacher) 16 min. 10 min. 15 min. 15 min.

13 Refining Observation Takeaways
Observation notes need to focus on the components and do not need to be scripted Calibration does not happen once; Observers need to continue to calibrate and refine their observational skills; Accurate observations and actionable feedback will move practice How might you work with your colleagues and teachers to remain calibrated this year? What benefits do you see in including teacher leaders in this work? Participant Packet: Page 4

14 Pushing Practice Through Feedback
Understand the difference between rationale and feedback Analyze options for delivering feedback GATHER & SORT INTERPRET DEVELOP FEEDBACK DELIVER FEEDBACK All educators deserve feedback We are constant learners The added focus this year is on developing and delivering that feedback As we move through this section please think through how teachers receive their observation data Let’s take a look at what teachers across the state had to say about their evaluation feedback

15 Rhode Island Educator Data Point
66% of teachers made some level of change to their teaching practice as a result of the feedback received. Ask participants to read the data point Remind participants that this is both an evaluation and support system (and the value of improving practice to better serve the students and families of our state)

16 Rhode Island Educator Data Point
EDUCATOR SELF-REPORTED NEXT STEPS: Of the 66% of educators that self-reported their change in practice, these are the actions that they took Name them Ask the group to think if these next steps are what they would want their teachers to do (Depending on time, conduct a turn and talk or just ask the whole group for thoughts) Consider what the remainder of the teachers did, and how can we ensure all educators are receiving that actionable feedback Reiterate the focus of this section is to ensure teachers are receiving feedback that they can act on to better support the learners in our schools Is this what you would expect? Would you want your teachers to do anything different?

17 Rationale and Feedback
GATHER & SORT INTERPRET DEVELOP FEEDBACK DELIVER FEEDBACK Rationale is... Evidence from observation Free from bias Grounded in the language of the rubric Format is flexible (bullet or narrative) Feedback is… Clear and direct Supportive and constructive Grounded in the language of the rubric when possible Addresses a specific component Prioritized Remind participants that teachers will see their written rationale (and that rationale can be hugely helpful for educators) That rationale should: Be precise- include several examples of evidence Make observations of evidence that stand independent of your opinions (premature interpretations of evidence that are based on personal beliefs). Statements are fact based and directly supported by aligned evidence. Evidence of practice/Rationale can be listed in bullet or short narrative form. Evidence of practice/Rationale should link back to the rubric.

18 Rationale and Feedback
Critiquing rationale and feedback: Review sample. Would you adjust anything within the rationale? What do you like about how this is written? Taking perspective: How do you think the educator might respond? What do you think the educator will do after reading? Would you adjust anything? Explain that they are going to look at a sample rationale from an evaluator who watched the same lesson that they used during the calibration exercise Reiterate that similar to their calibration scoring conversations, the rationales explain the scores Explain that they are also looking at two samples of feedback for the same educator that they observed Instruct the group once they get the handout to have conversations at their tables critiquing the rationale and feedback Ask for tables to provide one way to improve the rationale and one way to improve the feedback STRESS TO THE GROUP THAT THIS IS A SAMPLE AND NOT AN EXEMPLAR.

19 Consider a hard conversation that you have not had with someone.
Delivering Feedback GATHER & SORT INTERPRET DEVELOP FEEDBACK DELIVER FEEDBACK Reflection Scenario: Consider a hard conversation that you have not had with someone. What is your concern? Why is it a concern? Why do you think you have not said anything? Ask participants to think about their school and their teachers and begin to reflect about the scenario on the slide Ask for a thumbs up to show when they have an idea

20 Professional Foundations and Support & Development
Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Session 2: Professional Foundations and Teacher Support and Development Objectives Evaluators will: Understand the architecture and scoring method of the Professional Foundations Rubric Differentiate between various levels of performance on the Professional Foundations Rubric Create a take-away list of site-specific evidence to share with your school team Understand how the RI Model supports the development of educators In this segment of the training, we will focus on the Professional Foundations rubric. Similar to yesterday, we will review the architecture (organization) of the rubric, understand the differences in performance levels, and think through how you may collect evidence of this work back at your schools. We will also review the support and development aspects of the Rhode Island Model found within Edition II.

21 Edition II: Professional Foundations
Final Effectiveness Rating Professional Practice Professional Foundations (8 components) Student Learning Evaluation Criteria Let’s revisit the visual from yesterday. We are starting today with a focus on the Professional Foundations rubric. This rubric takes the place of Professional Responsibilities (from Edition I). The Professional Foundations Rubric also has 8 components. p. 11

22 Thinking Behind the Rating
GATHER & SORT INTERPRET DEVELOP FEEDBACK DELIVER FEEDBACK Differences between Professional Practice and Professional Foundations Similar thinking applies to the Professional Foundations Rubric. You will still need to gather evidence, sort, and interpret evidence. The differences between the two rubrics though is the way that you collect evidence, the components that you are sorting into, and the frequency at which you interpret/ score this rubric. We will discuss the in-action and artifact evidence shortly. Professional Practice Evidence collected during classroom observations Scored during classroom observations Professional Foundations In action and artifact evidence (p. 25) Scored based on evidence collected throughout the year.

23 Professional Foundations Architecture: At a Glance
Throughout the year, teachers and evaluators can enter evidence into EPSS. Before the mid-year and end-of-year conferences all evidence needed for the conference can be uploaded into EPSS. At mid-year conference evaluators have the option of reviewing all evidence collected and assigning a formative score. At end-year conference evaluators will determine ratings according to the PF rubric. A formative score at the mid-year is optional. Districts should decide if formative scores will be assigned. The Teacher Model rubrics are still organized by Domain. Each Domain has a group of Components (which are like our competencies. the At-a-Glance shows the structure of the domains, components, elements and possible examples of evidence. Please take a few moments to look this over. p. 18

24 Professional Foundations Architecture: Rubric Structure
Domain and Component Component Description Elements and Indicators Performance Level Descriptions We have aligned the format of the Teacher Professional Foundations Rubric with the revised format of the Teacher Professional Practice Rubric in Edition II; The layout and architecture are similar to the Professional Practice rubric we were using yesterday. Each component has its own page in the guidebook beginning on page 94. For each component, there is a component descriptor (which is a high level description of the component) as well as a set of elements and indicators (which help to provide focus for the component). Then there are performance level descriptors that each contain critical attributes and possible examples. The description and critical attributes help to delineate the difference between each performance level. Critical Attributes and possible examples are not checklists. Evaluators should avoid using them in such a way when assessing performance. The important aspect of the evidence is that there may be additional evidence that you might take into consideration based on your district and school context that are not currently listed here. Critical Attributes Possible Examples

25 Analysis of One Component
With a partner(s), you will analyze one component of the full rubric, and be prepared to report out on the following to the whole group: The title of the component The elements of this component Critical attributes – the type of evidence that will be noted for this component Possible examples or artifacts– generate a list of potential evidence that aligns with this component Review component independently Discuss and chart your analysis Share with the larger group Active Engagement 15 min group engagement with rubric Use directions on slide Divide group into 8 pairs/trios (each pair/trio is assigned one of the eight rubric components to analyze) Groups chart for reporting out Shareout: Call on one group at a time to report out to others about their component. Everyone should underline on rubric or take notes as appropriate during report out. Reminder: Keep the purpose of this work in mind Participants are not to become an expert on their component Avoid over-correcting but listen for egregious inaccuracies 15 min. 20 min.

26 Scoring Part 1: Case Study Teacher Profile A
Purpose Align evidence with components Based on evidence collected, assign component ratings Review the Case Study Profile Note where evidence supports particular PF components Review the annotated profile to compare component alignment. To practice aligning evidence to a component and scoring, we are going to work through a case study. For the purpose of this exercise and aligning our thinking around the Professional Foundations rubric we will be reviewing some documents that seek to capture one educator’s practice. (This is not perfect and all inclusive but our best thinking right now). Our goal is to engage with the rubric. Here is what we are going to do: You will first review the profile of a high school history teacher named George (1st box in flow chart). Using the Professional Foundations rubric in your Rubric Book (beginning on page 18), identify and note the Professional Foundations components for which the evidence presented in the case study profile aligns or provides evidence. Then, compare your notes to the annotated profile. (NOTE: Profile A is a middle/secondary level case study. Profile B is an elementary level and can be given out as additional practice if participants are interested.) 10 min. 10 min. p. 18 Rubric

27 Scoring Part 2: Case Study Teacher Profile A
Review additional evidence such as a lesson plan or a professional growth plan In groups, select a rating for each assigned PF component based on the evidence provided In your group, chart the PF components , your ratings, rationale, and feedback you would provide Group share Count off by 4. Group 1 will be assigned PF 1-2, Group 2 will be assigned PF 3-4, Group 3 will be assigned PF 5-6, and Group 4 will be assigned PF 7-8. Pass out additional evidence: Lesson Plan Before you get to your groups, review the additional evidence. Paying particular attention to your assigned components, select ratings for those two components based on evidence provided. Then, with your group, create a chart that displays which 2 components you worked on, the ratings you chose, your rationale, and potential feedback you might provide this teacher. Afterwards, we will do a quick share-out. (NOTE: Profile A is a middle/secondary level case study. Profile B is an elementary level and can be given out as additional practice if participants are interested.) Summarize the activity by highlighting that evidence for PF is collected through evaluator notes (in action) or select artifacts (artifacts do not necessarily have to be collected, they can be looked at). Focus of artifact collection should be on quality rather than quantity, and artifacts should be clearly connected to performance descriptors of one or more PF components (think file folder, rather than file cabinet). Districts have the flexibility to determine evidence for PF components. pp

28 Teacher Support and Development Process
Transition to teacher support and development aspect of the RI Model. RI Model teacher support process is grounded in feedback, reflection and establishing a professional growth plan.

29 Support and Development
The Rhode Island Model is designed to support teacher development by: Outlining high expectations that are clear and aligned to school, district, and state priorities; Establishing a common vocabulary for meeting expectations; Encouraging student-focused conversations to share best practices, and address common challenges; Grounding teacher professional development in data-driven collaboration, conferencing, observation, and feedback to meet shared goals for student achievement; and Providing a reliable process for educators to focus practice and drive student learning. Clarify bold text and bulleted points p. 17

30 Support and Development
Three Evaluation Conferences Beginning, Middle, and End-of Year based on Differentiation Self assessment (optional) optional reflective process use prior evaluation data to analyze and identify priorities for professional growth plan Allow participants 2-3 minutes to turn to Appendix 1 on page 65 in their guidebooks. Briefly orient participants to the layout and content of the conference tools: Beginning, Mid-Year, and End-of-Year conferences What teachers should do, what teacher evaluators should do, etc. Describes preparation for and outcomes of each conference. See p. 65 for Conference Planning Tools

31 Support and Development
Professional Growth Plan or Performance Improvement Plan One professional growth goal required (minimum) Goal(s) within a plan can span more than one school year, however, the activities and benchmarks for the goal should be identified for each year Clear action steps and benchmarks for meeting goal Aligned to the components within the teacher professional practice or professional foundations rubric Mid-Year Conference provides a formal opportunity for the teacher and evaluator to review the Professional Growth Plan and make adjustments, if necessary Performance Improvement Plan for teachers rated as Developing or Ineffective, or who are in need of targeted support anytime during the school year EPSS facilitates the conferencing and goal setting processes, and enables users to upload evidence related to professional growth plan Flexibility Factor: Schools and districts may determine that a school-wide approach for one professional growth goal is preferable p. 19

32 Support and Development
Professional Growth Plans are one way professional development initiatives can be integrated with educator evaluation State, district, school initiatives include: Transition to Common Core Secondary Reform Work Comprehensive Assessment System (CAS) Instructional Management System (IMS) Response to Intervention (RtI) Data systems and data analysis STEM curriculum and assessment Effective common planning time protocols To the extent possible, educators will want to align professional growth plans with school, district, state priorities and initiatives. Educators should establish professional growth plans that incorporate state, district, or school initiatives and capitalize on professional development opportunities.

33 Support and Development
Performance Improvement Plans – Targeted Support Educators who: receive a final effectiveness rating of Developing or Ineffective, or are determined to be in need of targeted support during the year, will work with their evaluator to develop a Performance Improvement Plan Performance Improvement Plans detail the more intensive support an educator will access to improve their practice Based on expectations established within RI Educator Evaluation System Standards Work with an improvement team More frequent benchmarks, greater monitoring Districts have flexibility to include additional requirements and expectations beyond RI Model minimum guidelines When establishing a performance improvement plan, clear action steps, benchmarks and expectations should be included.

34 Session 3 Closure Stop and Jot
Identify any planned (or potential) professional development to be offered in your district or school during Consider all district or school professional development efforts currently underway or planned for What opportunities can teachers in your school integrate into their professional growth plan? Think about how teachers can use these professional development opportunities in their professional growth planning. Stop and Jot: Districts, schools and teachers are continually engaged in professional development. A Professional Growth Plan is an important aspect of the RI Model that supports ongoing professional growth. Teachers will benefit from integrating professional development offered within their district or school as part of their professional growth plan.

35 Educator Performance Support System (EPSS)
Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Session 3: EPSS Objectives Evaluators will: Understand the general layout and purpose of the educator and evaluator dashboards Practice using EPSS as teacher evaluators Understand how multiple data points come together on a Mid-Year Conference form and Final Effectiveness Rating Report Know how to access the EPSS support options EXPLAIN: Today will serve as a preview to the EPSS system and functionality. We will be … (read or ask a participant to read the objectives). We will meet these objectives by providing some background and expectations of the system, accessing, and using some of the supports that are already available to you. Let’s get going…

36 Preparing for our next session:
Getting onto EPSS Go to https://ridemaptest.ride.ri.gov Enter your training Username/ Password Log in as a Teacher Select EPSS (Training Site). Select My Caseload Tab. PREPARE: Ensure that you have all necessary Usernames/Passwords to get Ps online at your training location. PREPARE: If needed, adjust pairings/groups, so that Ps who are less comfortable with technology will be near others who can help. ACCESS: Step 1: Get Ps logged in to the Internet. Step 2: After all Ps are online, help them get logged into the EPSS. ADJUST: Check to be sure that everyone is online and in the EPSS. By the end of the break, if any Ps are not able to access the EPSS, pair them up with someone who is and move on. EXPLAIN: We will be exploring core functionality through the sandbox which all districts will have access to in August to conduct trainings.

37 EPSS Purpose and Background
The purpose of the EPSS is to support high quality evaluation implementation, maximize educators’ time and resources, and provide a single data system for educator evaluation. Development background Forms and functionality streamlined Help resources READ the EPSS purpose statement in italics on this slide. EXPLAIN: Dev. Background: RIDE has been collaborating with selected vendor, My Learning Plan. The EPSS is based on an existing system, MyLearningPlan OASYS, that’s been used for more than three years all around the country with customizations to attend to the RIDE Model. Feedback/ Continued Development: Several system upgrades have already been identified for development during this coming year. Forms and functionality have been streamlined this year based on feedback from the field. Help: Detailed Help resources are built into the system. We will be accessing and using these resources today! New user guides will be on the website in August. There is also built in help on the system. p. 10

38 Overview of Your Evaluation Dashboard
Overview of My Evaluation dashboard Do walk through of each part of the dashboard. Give definition of dashboard. **Optional forms will not be on your dashboard unless your evaluator assigns them to you.

39 Professional Growth Plan
Look! Only one goal- type in action steps and when will they be completed. Shorter more concise….. Will probably go out live to the form – project onto the screen- and review each component with the participants. It is a one pager! Teachers will type in their professional growth goal for the school year. This goal can be based on self reflection and prior evaluation data. It can be reflective of an overall district initiative or a shared goal in a grade level or subject. Ex. Technology integration, discussion techniques, CCSS, the evaluation system etc. The goals are aligned to the PP and/or PF rubrics. The goals are to be specific and measureable. Teachers will type into the form the specific steps they will take to reach their goal and dates in which they believe they will accomplish those steps. Teachers will document what evidence they will use to prove they have met their goals and can upload artifacts and align them directly to the PGG form. The PGG will be discussed at the BOY. Progress toward the goal will be discussed at the Mid-year conference and completion of the goal will be discussed at the EOY conference. ?? Finalize? Submit? Approval?

40 Student Learning Objectives
**New Procedure for SLO approval** Lay out is organized by the three essential questions…. The SLO Form is designed to elicit answers to the following three essential questions: 1. What are the most important knowledge/skill(s) I want my students to attain by the end of the interval of instruction? 2. Where are my students now (at the beginning of instruction) with respect to the objective? 3. Based on what I know about my students, where do I expect them to be by the end of the interval of instruction and how will they demonstrate their knowledge/skill(s)? As you know Student Learning Objectives (SLO) is a measure of a teacher’s impact on student learning through demonstrated progress toward academic goals. Student learning is the single most important indicator of teacher effectiveness. Student learning measures, when combined with classroom observations (Professional Practice) and evidence of Professional Foundations improve the accuracy of the final effectiveness ratings for teachers. . Analyzing student learning data is a best practice for self-reflection and increased collaboration around student learning. This year the SLO process has been made simpler by the creation of separate SLO forms. The SLO forms are stand alone and are approved separately not collectively like last year. Teachers will complete the forms and submit them for approval. For more information on the SLO writing process go to : ADDENDUM TO THERHODE ISLAND MODEL TEACHER EVALUATION & SUPPORT SYSTEM Page 10 BAs will unlock each individual SLO to approve them or mark them as needs approval and will submit them back to the teacher. Evidence source is now where teachers will type in the assessment to be used, administration, and scoring information. Directions on the top of the page. Save and notify- alert the evaluator to view and give feedback. Teachers will save it during draft. Complete-submit- evaluator will have access to the SLO for individual approval –not more sets of SLO. Teachers can submit slos as they finish no need to wait until they have both SLOs completed. ** After the teacher has submitted the form the evaluator will click edit which will open only the approval of the objective piece which will allow evaluators to approve or assign needs for revision and add notes. They will then submit the form back to the teacher. If it is approved teacher will acknowledge. If it needs revisions the teacher will need to make edits and resubmit. **** speed and functionality.

41 Preparing for our next session:
Getting onto EPSS Go to https://ridemaptest.ride.ri.gov Enter your training Username/ Password Log in as a Principal Select EPSS (Training Site). Select My Caseload Tab. PREPARE: Ensure that you have all necessary Usernames/Passwords to get Ps online at your training location. PREPARE: If needed, adjust pairings/groups, so that Ps who are less comfortable with technology will be near others who can help. ACCESS: Step 1: Get Ps logged in to the Internet. Step 2: After all Ps are online, help them get logged into the EPSS. ADJUST: Check to be sure that everyone is online and in the EPSS. By the end of the break, if any Ps are not able to access the EPSS, pair them up with someone who is and move on. EXPLAIN: We will be exploring core functionality through the sandbox which all districts will have access to in August to conduct trainings.

42 Overview of Your Caseload Dashboard
Overview of caseload dashboard Introduce the new Config.Admin tab as that will be new to some. Explain its functionality and let them know they will see it in action in just a few slides. Major difference from last year: Each form is its own component. You will not see optional forms here either. Forms such as Self assessment, additional PGG, additional SLOS, SOO, additional observations if needed, and PIP are all what are now called Zero Instance forms and will not show up on the evaluation profile unless the evaluator assigns those forms to the teacher. In a few moments I will show you how that works.

43 Same Forms…..New Look…. Better Functionality
Go live to the site and go through forms from start to finish. Explain whether the form is teacher initated or evaluator initiated, showcase the form. Let pps play.

44 Beginning of the Year Conference Form
Nothing to do with this-talk through it- ** Will note that the previously discussed self-assessment and PGG should be discussed at the BOY conference. The BOY conference is also the time to review SLOs and look ahead to the new school year. The Differentiated Evaluation Process for Teachers provides schools and districts with greater flexibility for classroom observations, evaluation conferences and Professional Growth Plans. The minimum number of required evaluation conferences is determined by the teacher’s previous year’s final effectiveness rating and the Differentiated Evaluation Process. Each teacher will have between 1 and 3 Evaluation Conferences.. When planning for the BOY conference : The form itself does not require any data entry. It is used as guide for the conference topics. The form can be later finalized when closing out beginning of the year components.

45 Introducing Zero-Instance Components
Zero Instance Components are forms such as Self assessment Additional PGG- Professional Growth Goals Additional SLOS- First two will populate into the evaluation profile SOO-Student Outcome Objectives if deemed appropriate. Additional observations if needed Performance Improvement Plans PIP Principal will have access to Zero Instance Components through the Config. Admin tab. How to add zero instance forms: Config. Admin tab User Components link User –type in teacher name shows all of the components assigned to that teacher. Change the number using the arrow keys to add a form. Click and this will automatically add the form to the teacher’s profile. As you just saw the PGG had one goal. If a teacher wanted or needed more goals you can add an additional form. Forms such as Self assessment, additional PGG, additional SLOS, SOO, additional observations if needed, and PIP are all what are now called Zero Instance forms and will not show up on the evaluation profile unless the evaluator assigns those forms to the teacher. SLO vs SOO ( if asked) Both SLOs and SOOs can be used as a measure of a support professional’s impact on student learning, either directly through demonstrated progress toward specific, measureable goals, or through increasing access to learning. An SLO is a long-term academic goal set for groups of students. An SOO is a long-term goal that is focused on an outcome that increases access to learning or creates conditions that facilitate learning I will go over the steps to adding a Zero Instance Component. Please watch first and then I will ask you to add a Zero Instance form in the Sandbox. Differentiated evaluation>>>>. Match it up with different cycles. Tread very carefully. Can have access to all teachers in district. Technically fixable. Next slide step by step with images.

46 Let’s Add a PGG! 1. 2. 3. Click on the Config Admin tab.
Select the user who needs an additional form. Use the number slider to add a form. 2. 3.

47 Classroom Observation Form
Piece by Piece- Classroom Observation form- Walk through. Discuss taking notes inside the form. Can copy and paste from other applications. Can open when connected to Wi-Fi and type in the form when not connected-will automatically save when reconnected to Wi-Fi and save is selected. Mention the personal note pad and its functionality. Notes only visible to evaluator- must remember they are part of the teachers file. Typing in notes is optional and the notes can still be kept in notebook on in a computer file. Will probably go out live to the form – project onto the screen- and review each component with the participants. The Differentiated Evaluation Process for Teachers provides schools and districts with greater flexibility for classroom observations, evaluation conferences and Professional Growth Plans. Sleek and simple! Look at this new observation form. The rubrics have been removed to make the form shorter and easier to maneuver through. Of course you will still want to have your PP rubric near by when scoring practices. PP Rubric starts on page 75 of your guidebook or you may click on the PP link included on the form. Continue walk through As you can see you will score the four Domain 2 components followed by rationale for those scores. You will then score the four Domain 3 components and will follow that with rationale for those scores in the section just under the domain 3 scores. Discuss link to PP rubric-opens in a new link. Can copy and paste from rubric to form though you may have to play a bit with the formatting. Could always copy and paste into a word document, craft rationale and copy and paste into the observation form. Clicking on the scoring box will select that score for each component Rationale for the entire Domain 2 now instead of for each component. Discuss wording from the rubric ( as noted in the original screen) From Summer (2014) Academy wording: Note that since we are constantly building our familiarity with the rubric and that shared language of instruction, we might start gathering and sorting at the same time Note that despite our familiarity with the rubric and with our teachers, it is critical that we stay true to this process by providing teachers with accurate information about their practice as well as feedback that helps them improve.

48 Mid-Year Year Conference Form
Will pull in SLO title-objectives and possibly targets. Links to artifacts. The new and improved mid-year conference form is more streamlined and filled with self-populated information. All scores from completed observations will be visible and averaged. All written feedback included on the completed observations will also be included in the MYC form. Artifacts uploaded to support SLOs and Professional Foundations will be easily accessible through a link to each individual file. Links to the SLOs will also be available for viewing. The mid-year conference is a time when evaluators and teachers can discuss all aspects of the teacher’s performance to date including professional practice, professional foundations ( which a formative score can be given during the MYC) and progress toward SLOs. In some cases this may be the time for making small revisions to PGG or SLOs. See your guidebook for specific requirements for revising SLOs. A formative score at the mid-year point is optional but is recommended to inform educators of their progress to date. Show scoring options. A link to the rubric is provided. PF is scored on a 1-3 scoring band with a 2 meeting expectations, a 3 exceeds expectations and a 1 being an area of growth. \ Many of the components in the PF rubric can be seen in action, but you or your teachers may upload documentation to support any or all of the components via the upload artifact tool. All uploaded documents aligned to the PF rubric will have visible links in the artifact file, in the MYC form and in the PF form. See next page for PF feedback. Sandbox- play- formative scores type in some feedback will feed into PF form. NOT the additional info section. At the end of the MYC form you will have an area in which to type feedback on the scores given or supports and advice shared with the teacher during the MYC. This information will automatically populate into the PF form and will act as a resource when assigning the holistic scores for professional foundations prior to the End of Year conference. You may also add any additional notes to the form prior to submitting it to the teacher for acknowledgement. Note: The additional notes and the PP feedback typed into this form will not populate into any other form.

49 Year-End Scoring Forms

50 Professional Foundations Form
Open all year long. Can use the additional scoring evidence section all year as a running record. Any notes the evaluator wants to keep but not yet share with teachers it should go into the NOTES section. Once you hit submit teachers will be able to view and acknowledge this form. Play in reality will populate into the FERR which we will not see today as it will be released at the end of the year. Growth scores will be populated directly into the FERR – nothing needs to be done on the evaluator side. The Professional Foundations form like our other forms has had a improving make-over. When completing this form evaluators can use the notes section, visible only to the evaluator as a means of recording in action documentation for the PF components in which support for the PF need not be in artifact form. Just under the notes section the form will automatically populate with any notes typed in in the PF section of the Mid-Year conference form. Any documents to support the PF components whether uploaded and aligned to professional foundations by the evaluator or the teacher will be visible via a link on this form. Simply clicking the link will open the form for viewing. Prior to the End of the Year Conference evaluators will review all of the evidence collected throughout the year and will assign a holistic score for each component by clicking on the rubric score that best reflects the teacher’s support of their school, students, community and colleagues. Using the wording from the rubric as a guide. A three exceeds expectations, a two meets expectations, and a one signals an area of needed growth- does not meet expectations. The new Professional Foundations form has one area for feedback on Professional Foundations as a whole. Feedback is what every professional needs to strive towards excellence. Concrete feedback helps the recipient to improve as well as acknowledges their hard work and dedication to their students, school, community and colleagues. As will all of the evaluation forms the protocol for submitting/saving/printing remains the same.

51 Student Learning Objectives Scoring Form
Prior to the End of the Year Conference teachers should submit all available student learning data to the evaluator. This year to do this teachers will open the SLO Results and Scoring Form where they will type the results of their SLO summative assessment data and their summary and thoughts on the results directly into the form’s Results and Summary section. They will do this for each of the SLOs they have written. Teachers must have a minimum of 2 SLOs and no more than four. Once teachers have typed in their results and have saved the form the results will be come visible to the evaluator so the SLOs can be scored. Any SLO related materials uploaded and aligned with SLOs will also be viewable via a link located in the SLO scoring form.

52 Final Effectiveness Rating Report/ End of the Year Conference
We need to check this. I am using screen shots from but will have growth model which is not represented here. There will be questions. The final effectiveness ratting for teachers will combine an individual’s Student Learning Score ( SLO score and RI Growth Model where applicable), the Professional Practice and Professional Foundations score. The scoring bands remain Highly Effective, Effective, Developing and Ineffective. The Final Effectiveness Rating Report if automatically populated from the other forms used throughout the year. The Professional Practice score will come from the averaged observation scores for each Professional Practice component. As seen in this slide.

53 Performance Improvement Plan –Zero Instance Form
A Performance Improvement Plan provides intensive support for teachers who are not meeting expectations. A Performance Improvement Plan may be utilized at any time during the school year but must be put in place is a teacher receives a final effectiveness rating of Developing or Ineffective. A teacher who has a Performance Improvement Plan will work with an improvement team to assist him/her to develop the plan. This form outlines the plan of action. The form ask that a specific goal be identified and aligned to the areas in the Professional Practice Rubric or Professional Foundations Rubric where the need for improvement/growth has been documented.

54 Student Outcome Objective-Zero Instance Form
Wording from Support Professionals Guidebook. Student Learning Objectives and Student Outcome Objectives Both SLOs and SOOs can be used as a measure of a support professional’s impact on student learning, either directly through demonstrated progress toward specific, measureable goals, or through increasing access to learning. An SLO is a long-term academic goal set for groups of students. An SOO is a long-term goal that is focused on an outcome that increases access to learning or creates conditions that facilitate learning. Both SLOs and SOOs can be set for the school year or an interval of service delivery/instruction appropriate to their assignment (e.g., a single semester). They must be specific and measureable, based on available student information, and aligned with standards, as well as any school and district priorities where applicable. Additionally:  The SLO/SOO process respects the diversity of all support professionals’ roles. The best way to measure student outcomes or student access to learning differs from role to role. These objectives present an opportunity for support professionals to be actively involved in deciding how to best measure the outcomes of goals for their specific population of students, while providing a consistent process for all support professionals across the state.  SLOs/SOOs focus educator attention where it matters most: on student outcomes. Both SOOs and SLOs ask support professionals to think strategically about their impact on student learning, whether through direct instruction or increasing access to learning. Support Professional Online Training Modules and Guidebooks available on the RIDE website.

55 Teacher Self-Assessment- Zero Instance Form
Optional – nothing for pps to do with this form. Will probably go out live to the form – project onto the screen- and review each component with the participants. Completing the self-assessment is an optional aspect of the RI Model, but a school or district may choose to make it a requirement. Completing a self-assessment is recommended for teachers who are new to the RI Model. The teacher self assessment form is also sleeker this year. The dropdown rubrics for PP and Pf have been removed. A link to the rubrics have been provided so you may open the rubrics in a new tab or window and reference them while working on this form. Teachers will rate themselves by using the Teacher PP and PF Rubrics, to identify strengths and areas of growth for each domain. Not all components must be selected. Teachers will give a brief statement about both their strengths and weaknesses for both PP and PF. Teachers will then have an opportunity to write up to 3 areas of priority growth which they can use as a springboard for their professional growth goal(s). Teachers will then have an opportunity to write up to 3 areas of priority growth which they can use as a springboard for their professional growth goal(s). Teachers will be able to save/submit….etc. This brings us to the PGG form.

56 Uploading Artifacts

57 Uploading Artifacts to EPSS

58 Supports and Resources for EPSS
Within SSO We are offering in-person trainings this summer- see pd calendar for details All user guides will be updated in August for the new school year Resources available include: RIDE EPSS site EPSS Help Sample videos In-person Trainings this summer

59 Running Reports Overview of what reports can be run and why.

60 Running Reports in EPSS
Overview, example and then a ‘now you try’ practice. Caseload Detail View Rubric Explorer Trend Explorer New evaluation data report!

61 Caseload Detail View

62 Rubric Explorer Reports
Overview, example and then a ‘now you try’ practice.

63 Rubric Explorer Reports

64 Trend Explorer Reports
Overview, example and then a ‘now you try’ practice.

65 Trend Explorer Reports
Review all options: Date Report Filters Questions Users Etc. Include progress Group by (dates) Tally by View

66 Final Evaluation Data Summary Report

67 3 Actions to follow this training: 2 Challenges to anticipate:
Session Closure 3 Actions to follow this training: 2 Challenges to anticipate: 1 Possible Solution: Provide the participants time to reflect and respond to the prompts. (3 min)


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