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Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper.

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2 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ OBJECTIVES After studying Chapter 11, the reader should be able to: 1.Check the fluid level in an automatic transmission. 2.Check automatic transmission fluid condition. 3.Change the fluid in an automatic transmission. 4.Adjust manual shift linkage. 5.Adjust throttle linkage. 6.Adjust a band in an automatic transmission. 7.Complete the SAE tasks related to transmission/transaxle maintenance and adjustment (see Appendix A).

3 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ INTRODUCTION Automatic transmissions and transaxles can operate properly for many miles while being totally neglected. Some that fail could have had a longer service life if they had been properly maintained. Several surveys of transmission shops have produced responses that over 80% of transmission failures were the result of neglecting to change the fluid. Newer transmissions require very little maintenance.

4 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ FLUID CHECKS The operator of a vehicle should check the fluid level in an automatic transmission periodically. A good time is right after every engine oil change. If the level is low, fluid of the correct type should be added. It usually takes one pint (0.5 L) to move the fluid level from low to the full mark on the dipstick.

5 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ FLUID CHECKS FIGURE 11-1 Most dipsticks have fluid-level markings for various temperatures. The vehicle should not be operated if the level is below the underfill or above the overfill marks.

6 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ FLUID CHECKS To check transmission fluid, you should: To check sealed transmission fluid level, you should

7 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ FLUID CHECKS FIGURE 11-2 When checking the fluid level, the engine should be at idle speed, the fluid hot, and the gear selector should be positioned as required by the vehicle manufacturer. Note the fluid level and compare it with dipstick markings. It is also a good practice to note any unusual fluid color or odor.

8 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ FLUID CHECKS FIGURE 11-3 Fluid level on sealed units (without a dipstick) is checked by removing the level plug, which can be mounted in the bottom or side of the pan or in the case.

9 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ FLUID CHECKS Transaxle Final Drives and Differentials Fluid Condition FIGURE 11-4 Some transaxle differentials have a plug to allow checking of the fluid level in the final drive section. (Courtesy of Chrysler Corporation)

10 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ FLUID CHECKS FIGURE 11-5 A useful chart for checking fluid level and condition. (Reprinted with permission of General Motors)

11 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ FLUID CHECKS FIGURE 11-6 Fluid condition can be checked by placing a sample on clean, white, absorbent paper (a). Clean fluid will spread out and leave only a wet stain (b). Dirty fluid will leave deposits of foreign material.

12 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ FLUID CHANGES Most manufacturers recommend fluid changes every 100,000 miles (160,000 km) under normal driving conditions. Some recommend a fluid change at 50,000 miles (80,000 km). Severe driving conditions are described as: –Frequent trailer pulling. –Heavy city traffic, especially in areas where the temperature exceeds 90°F (32°C). –Very hilly or mountainous conditions. –Commercial use such as taxi or delivery service. –Police or ambulance usage.

13 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ FLUID CHANGES FIGURE 11-7 In many transmissions, the fluid is expected to last 100,000 miles if the fluid temperature can be kept below 175°F (80°C); but the life will be cut in half for every 20°F increase in temperature.

14 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ FLUID CHANGES Fluid Changing, Dropping the Pan

15 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ TECH TIP FIGURE 11-8 Since most transmissions do not have drain plugs, the fluid must be spilled in a controlled fashion by lowering the pan at an angle. To do this, all but two bolts are removed. As the last two bolts are loosened, the pan will lower and fluid will spill over the edge.

16 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ FLUID CHANGES To change transmission fluid, you should: FIGURE 11-9 Fluid is draining from this transmission pan. Note how the pan is hanging from two front bolts.

17 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ FLUID CHANGES FIGURE A gasket splitter is used to break the seal between the pan and transmission case. It is tapped in between the pan and case and then tapped sideways, around the pan.

18 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ FLUID CHANGES FIGURE The filter is normally located in the oil pan (a); note the magnet inside the pan to trap ferrous metals. The filter is held by three screws (b). (Courtesy of Chrysler Corporation)

19 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ FLUID CHANGES FIGURE This pan magnet has a thin coating of very fine iron particles and the pan is fairly clean. This is normal transmission wear.

20 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ TECH TIP Some technicians will cut the old filter open so they can inspect for foreign particles FIGURE This depth filter has been cut open, and there are only a few small metal particles caught in the fold.

21 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ TECH TIP Many transmissions are shipped to the vehicle assembly line wet (full of fluid) and a sealing device is used to close the openings for the drive shaft(s) and dipstick tube. FIGURE This “popcycle” was found laying in the transmission pan. It was used to plug the dipstick opening while the transmission was shipped to the vehicle assembly line.

22 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ TECH TIP If the flange surface is bent or has dimples, it should be flattened using a hammer and block of wood, vise, or anvil. FIGURE The flange area of a pan should be checked for distortion from overtightened bolts. These can be corrected by tapping down the raised areas as shown.

23 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ FLUID CHANGES FIGURE If the transmission fluid and filter are replaced, the proper amount of fluid will overfill the transmission (a). The fill procedure should add fluid to a full level and then start the engine (b). Add additional fluid as needed to bring it to the proper level (c). Checking the engine with the engine off can show an overfill if the converter drains down (d).

24 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ FLUID CHANGES Fluid Changing, Fluid Evacuator –To change transmission fluid using an evacuating tool, you should: Fluid Exchange and Flush Units –To change fluid using a transmission fluid exchange unit, you should: FIGURE This fluid evacuation system has a small tube that can be inserted into the transmission dipstick tube. A connection to shop air is used to create a vacuum that sucks the fluid into the container. (Courtesy of ATEC Trans-Tool and Cleaning Systems)

25 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ FLUID CHANGES FIGURE This transmission flusher pumps new fluid into the transmission pump intake. It is operated until the old, dirty fluid is forced out. (Courtesy of Goodall Manufacturing)

26 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ FLUID CHANGES FIGURE A fluid exchange unit is normally connected to the cooler return line, and it sends new fluid to the transmission to replace the old fluid being captured from the cooler.

27 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ MANUAL LINKAGE CHECKS The manual linkage is adjustable on most automatic transmissions. This ensures the manual valve is positioned correctly relative to the gear selector. Linkage position should be checked periodically because a misadjusted linkage can cause the manual valve to leak oil pressure into the wrong passage

28 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ MANUAL LINKAGE CHECKS FIGURE Proper manual linkage ensures that manual valve position (a) matches correctly with the position of the manual shift lever and shift indicator (b). (Courtesy of Chrysler Corporation)

29 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ MANUAL LINKAGE CHECKS To check manual linkage adjustment, you should: FIGURE As the shift selector is moved across the quadrant, you should be able to feel the detents inside the transmission. The detent feel should correspond with the gear position. (Reprinted with permission of General Motors)

30 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ MANUAL LINKAGE CHECKS FIGURE This neutral safety switch is mounted in the transmission and operated by the manual lever cam. It always stays in proper adjustment. (Courtesy of Chrysler Corporation)

31 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ MANUAL LINKAGE CHECKS FIGURE This neutral safety switch is mounted to the outside of the transmission case. If the starter operates with the gear selector in a position other than park or neutral, the switch position should be adjusted. (Courtesy of Chrysler Corporation)

32 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ MANUAL LINKAGE CHECKS Manual Linkage Adjustment –The manual linkage should be adjusted if the starter engagements occur in the wrong position or the transmission detents do not align correctly relative to the gear range pointer. To adjust manual shift linkage, you should: Shift Lock Mechanism –The shift interlock mechanism locks the shifter in park position when the ignition key is removed.

33 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ MANUAL LINKAGE CHECKS FIGURE A floor-mounted shift linkage using a cable (a); a floor-mounted shift linkage using rods (b); and a column-mounted shift linkage using rods (c). Each one has a method of adjusting the length for proper gear positioning (circled). (Courtesy of Chrysler Corporation)

34 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ MANUAL LINKAGE CHECKS FIGURE (CONTINUED) A floor-mounted shift linkage using a cable (a); a floor- mounted shift linkage using rods (b); and a column-mounted shift linkage using rods (c). Each one has a method of adjusting the length for proper gear positioning (circled). (Courtesy of Chrysler Corporation)

35 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ MANUAL LINKAGE CHECKS FIGURE This neutral safety switch is mounted to the outside of the transmission case. If the starter operates with the gear selector in a position other than park or neutral, the switch position should be adjusted. (Courtesy of Chrysler Corporation)

36 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ MANUAL LINKAGE CHECKS FIGURE The manual shift lever is in park. The linkage adjustment is being tightened to lock the adjustment after making sure that the transmission is in park.

37 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ THROTTLE LINKAGE CHECKS Nonelectronic transmissions may have a throttle rod or cable that connects the engine’s throttle linkage to the transmission’s throttle valve. This linkage is commonly called a TV linkage. The TV linkage controls a valve that produces a rise in TV or line pressure that is matched to the throttle position. To check TV linkage, you should:

38 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ THROTTLE LINKAGE CHECKS FIGURE This TV cable connects the throttle body (a) to the transmission (b). The adjustment is at the throttle body cable bracket. (Courtesy of Chrysler Corporation)

39 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ THROTTLE LINKAGE CHECKS Throttle Linkage Adjustments –Like the manual shift linkage, TV linkage is adjustable. –Always consult the service manual for that particular vehicle when making an adjustment. –To adjust TV linkage, you should: –Throttle Position Sensor Position Adjustment FIGURE This throttle linkage is adjusted by turning the two adjusting nuts until the cable stopper ring is the correct distance from the housing end.

40 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ THROTTLE LINKAGE CHECKS FIGURE This throttle cable uses a “snap lock” adjuster that is adjusted using the procedure shown. (Reprinted with permission of General Motors)

41 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ THROTTLE LINKAGE CHECKS FIGURE This “self-adjusting” TV cable is adjusted using the procedure shown. (Reprinted with permission of General Motors)

42 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ THROTTLE LINKAGE CHECKS FIGURE This “self-adjusting” TV cable used with some transaxles is adjusted using the procedure shown. (Reprinted with permission of General Motors)

43 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ THROTTLE LINKAGE CHECKS FIGURE The throttle position sensor normally has an adjustment so it is positioned correctly on the throttle body. (Courtesy of Chrysler Corporation)

44 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ BAND ADJUSTMENTS At one time, a common transmission maintenance procedure was to readjust the band clearance. Wear of the friction material would increase the clearance to the point where engagement would not be complete and slippage would occur. To readjust a band, you should:

45 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ BAND ADJUSTMENTS FIGURE When a band is new, the servo piston travels only a short distance to apply it. As the lining wears, servo piston travel increases; if there is too much wear, the band might not tighten completely.

46 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ BAND ADJUSTMENTS FIGURE This band is adjusted by holding the adjuster screw while the lock nut is loosened (a). Step 2 turns the adjuster screw inward to 72 in-lbs (8 N-m) of torque. The special adapter is used if there is tight access (b). Step 3 is to back off the adjusting screw the proper number of turns and tighten the lock nut to the correct torque. (Courtesy of Chrysler Corporation)

47 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ SUMMARY 1.Automatic transmissions require periodic service and maintenance. 2.Transmission fluid should be regularly checked for correct level and good condition. 3.The transmission fluid should be changed at the required intervals or if the condition indicates the need for a change. 4.The manual shift linkage and the throttle linkage need to be checked and adjusted if necessary. 5.Some transmissions have one or more bands that may need to be adjusted.

48 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ REVIEW QUESTIONS 1.Servicing and maintaining an automatic transmission includes: a.Checking the _________ level. b.Changing the _________. c.Cleaning or replacing the _________. d.Checking and adjusting the _________ and _________ linkages. e._________ the bands if required. 2.It usually takes _________ _________ to change the fluid level from low to full on the dipstick. 3.Mushy operation, lack of engagement, or slipping can be caused by a transmission that has a fluid level that is too _________.

49 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ REVIEW QUESTIONS 4.Before checking the fluid level, the vehicle should a.be on _________ ground. b.be in _________. c.be at normal operating _________. d.have the engine _________. 5.All transaxles share fluid between the differential and the transmission. True or False? 6.When checking the fluid level, the _________ and _________ should also be checked. 7.The normal color of automatic transmission fluid is _________. 8.What is indicated by these fluid conditions? a.Dark brown color b.Burned odor c.Pink or milky color d.Gold or brown coating on the dipstick e.Metallic appearance f.Foamy

50 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ REVIEW QUESTIONS 9.An automatic transmission can be ruined by contaminated _________. 10.Severe driving conditions include: a.Frequent _________ pulling. b.Heavy _________ and _________ traffic. c._________ weather conditions. d._________ service. e._________ or _________ police usage. 11.The major factor that affects transmission fluid life is _________. 12.To change fluid in most automatic transmissions, the _________ must be removed. 13.Before installing the clean pan after draining the fluid, check the pan for _________ and _________ sealing surface. 14.The notchy feel and clicking sound when a gear is selected is caused by the spring-loaded _________.

51 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ REVIEW QUESTIONS 15.To properly adjust the manual linkage, always check the manufacturer’s _________ procedures. 16.A sticking, binding, or out-of-adjustment throttle valve cable can cause _________ shifts, _________ shifts, or late, soft, mushy or no downshifts. 17.An exact check for proper throttle valve operation is made using a _________ gauge. 18.It is always necessary to consult a _________ _________ when making a throttle linkage adjustment. 19.Throttle position sensor adjustment will affect _________ operation, vehicle _________, and transmission _________ quality. 20.Many modern automatic transmissions use a band that does not require adjustment because the band is only used for _________ braking and in _________ ranges.

52 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 1.Student A says that you should check the transmission fluid level with the engine idling in park. Student B says that if the end of the dipstick is too hot to hold, the fluid can be considered hot. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

53 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 1.Student A says that you should check the transmission fluid level with the engine idling in park. Student B says that if the end of the dipstick is too hot to hold, the fluid can be considered hot. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

54 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 2.Student A says that on most dipsticks, the distance from the bottom of the cross-hatched area to the top is equal to 1 pint of fluid. Student B says that too much fluid in a transmission can cause poor shifts. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

55 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 2.Student A says that on most dipsticks, the distance from the bottom of the cross-hatched area to the top is equal to 1 pint of fluid. Student B says that too much fluid in a transmission can cause poor shifts. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

56 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 3.The transmission fluid should be changed if it has a)black or brown coloration. b)a definite burned smell. c)gone the limit of miles recommended by the manufacturer. d)Any of these

57 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 3.The transmission fluid should be changed if it has a)black or brown coloration. b)a definite burned smell. c)gone the limit of miles recommended by the manufacturer. d)Any of these

58 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 4.Student A says that too high a fluid level can cause foamy fluid to spill out of the vents or filler pipe. Student B says that too low a fluid level can cause this same problem. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

59 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 4.Student A says that too high a fluid level can cause foamy fluid to spill out of the vents or filler pipe. Student B says that too low a fluid level can cause this same problem. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

60 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 5.Student A says that all ATF is a bright medium-red color. Student B says that all ATF has the same burnt, oily smell. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

61 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 5.Student A says that all ATF is a bright medium-red color. Student B says that all ATF has the same burnt, oily smell. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

62 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 6.A pink transmission fluid color indicates a)normal operation. b)too high a level and air in the fluid. c)water in the fluid. d)None of these

63 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 6.A pink transmission fluid color indicates a)normal operation. b)too high a level and air in the fluid. c)water in the fluid. d)None of these

64 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 7.Student A says that transmission fluid life is dependent on the transmission’s operating temperature. Student B says that driving conditions that increase fluid temperature, such as trailer towing or delivery-type operations, shorten fluid life. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

65 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 7.Student A says that transmission fluid life is dependent on the transmission’s operating temperature. Student B says that driving conditions that increase fluid temperature, such as trailer towing or delivery-type operations, shorten fluid life. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

66 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 8.Student A says that most transmissions can be drained by removing the drain plug. Student B says that you should also change the filter when the fluid is changed. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

67 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 8.Student A says that most transmissions can be drained by removing the drain plug. Student B says that you should also change the filter when the fluid is changed. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

68 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 9.Student A says that you normally have to start the engine as you refill a transmission with fluid. Student B says that a torque converter can be refilled with the engine off. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

69 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 9.Student A says that you normally have to start the engine as you refill a transmission with fluid. Student B says that a torque converter can be refilled with the engine off. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

70 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 10.Student A says that if an engine cranks while the gear position indicator is in drive, the manual shift linkage is out of adjustment. Student B says that this problem can be caused by a misadjusted neutral safety switch. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

71 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 10.Student A says that if an engine cranks while the gear position indicator is in drive, the manual shift linkage is out of adjustment. Student B says that this problem can be caused by a misadjusted neutral safety switch. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

72 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 11.You can quickly check the adjustment of the manual shift linkage by a)trying the operation of the starter in the various gear positions. b)feeling for the transmission internal detents as you move the gear selector from park to low. c)feeling for complete engagement of the lever pawl into the park gate. d)Any of these

73 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 11.You can quickly check the adjustment of the manual shift linkage by a)trying the operation of the starter in the various gear positions. b)feeling for the transmission internal detents as you move the gear selector from park to low. c)feeling for complete engagement of the lever pawl into the park gate. d)Any of these

74 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 12.Student A says that a misadjusted manual linkage can cause vehicle creep in neutral. Student B says that a gear selector can slip out of park if the linkage is not adjusted correctly. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

75 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 12.Student A says that a misadjusted manual linkage can cause vehicle creep in neutral. Student B says that a gear selector can slip out of park if the linkage is not adjusted correctly. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

76 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 13.Student A says that most manual linkages can be easily adjusted by repositioning the adjustable end of the rod or cable. Student B says that the selector lever should be positioned in reverse while adjusting the linkage. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

77 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 13.Student A says that most manual linkages can be easily adjusted by repositioning the adjustable end of the rod or cable. Student B says that the selector lever should be positioned in reverse while adjusting the linkage. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

78 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 14.If the throttle linkage is too short, the transmission will probably a)shift early. b)have very late shifts. c)have soft, mushy shifts. d)Both a and b

79 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 14.If the throttle linkage is too short, the transmission will probably a)shift early. b)have very late shifts. c)have soft, mushy shifts. d)Both a and b

80 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 15.Student A says that sticky throttle linkage can cause erratic shifts. Student B says that passing gear engagement is affected by the throttle linkage adjustment. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

81 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 15.Student A says that sticky throttle linkage can cause erratic shifts. Student B says that passing gear engagement is affected by the throttle linkage adjustment. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

82 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 16.Student A says that the bands in modern transmissions can be adjusted using an adjuster screw that extends out at the side of the transmission case. Student B says that if the intermediate band (three-speed transmission) is too tight, there will be a drag in reverse. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

83 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 16.Student A says that the bands in modern transmissions can be adjusted using an adjuster screw that extends out at the side of the transmission case. Student B says that if the intermediate band (three-speed transmission) is too tight, there will be a drag in reverse. Who is correct? a)Student A b)Student B c)Both A and B d)Neither A nor B

84 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 17.To drain the fluid from the differential of a transaxle, a)remove the transaxle pan. b)drain the differential separately from the transmission. c)check the service manual for the proper procedure. d)There is no need to check the differential fluid.

85 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 17.To drain the fluid from the differential of a transaxle, a)remove the transaxle pan. b)drain the differential separately from the transmission. c)check the service manual for the proper procedure. d)There is no need to check the differential fluid.

86 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 18.The shift lock mechanism is used to prevent the shifter from being moved out of park unless a)the brakes are applied and/or the key is in the ignition. b)the doors are closed and the key is in the ignition. c)the seat belts are on and the doors are closed. d)the doors are closed and the brakes are applied.

87 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles, Fourth Edition By Tom Birch and Chuck Rockwood © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Inc. Pearson Prentice Hall - Upper Saddle River, NJ CHAPTER QUIZ 18.The shift lock mechanism is used to prevent the shifter from being moved out of park unless a)the brakes are applied and/or the key is in the ignition. b)the doors are closed and the key is in the ignition. c)the seat belts are on and the doors are closed. d)the doors are closed and the brakes are applied.


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