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Increasing Motivation in Career Development Virginia Career VIEW Fall 2013 Workshop.

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Presentation on theme: "Increasing Motivation in Career Development Virginia Career VIEW Fall 2013 Workshop."— Presentation transcript:

1 Increasing Motivation in Career Development Virginia Career VIEW Fall 2013 Workshop

2 What is motivation? The processes that give behavior its energy and direction NOTE: To change images on this slide, select a picture and delete it. Then click the Insert Picture icon in the placeholder to insert your own image. Jones, B. & Chittum, J. (2013). Learning and Cognition EDEP Introduction to Motivation PowerPoint, Slide 8.

3 Why should we motivate students? Increased motivation Increased learning Increased performance NOTE: To change images on this slide, select a picture and delete it. Then click the Insert Picture icon in the placeholder to insert your own image. Jones, B. & Chittum, J. (2013). Learning and Cognition EDEP Introduction to Motivation PowerPoint, Slide 12.

4 How does this connect to career development? “When students perceive math (e.g., Hulleman, Godes, Hendricks, & Harackiewicz, 2010) and science (e.g., Ainley & Ainley, 2011) to be useful, they tend to be more interested in it. Instructors can demonstrate the usefulness of the content by explaining to students how the material is related to their interests, career goals, and/or the real world; or by providing opportunities for students to engage in activities that demonstrate the usefulness of the content (for examples, see Jones, 2009) (Jones, B., Ruff, C., & Osborne, J.W., in preparation).” NOTE: To change images on this slide, select a picture and delete it. Then click the Insert Picture icon in the placeholder to insert your own image. Jones, B. D., Ruff, C., & Osborne, J.W. (in preparation). Fostering students’ identification with mathematics and science. In K.A. Renninger, M. Nieswandt, & S. Hidi (Eds.), Handbook on interest, the Self, and K-16 mathematics and science learning. Washington, DC: American Educational Research Association.

5 Relevance to Career Development Federal and State InitiativesCurrent Initiatives Career Pathways Academic and Career Plans STEM Focus Career and College Ready Creative and Critical Thinking Skills 21 st Century Skills Programs such as Kindergarten to College and Kids Tech University Others?

6 Other Factors…Other Theories… Self-efficacy: a person’s perception of his or her capabilities to perform behaviors at a certain level (Schunk and Pajares, 2005, p. 85) “I am confident I will be able to solve this math problem” Self-concept: a composite view of oneself (Bong Skaalvik, 2003, p.4) “I learn mathematics quickly” Self-esteem: a person’s attitude about his/her overall self-worth (Klassen, Krawchuck and Rajani, 2007, p. 918) “On the whole, I am satisfied with myself” (New York State Self Esteem Scale)

7 Intrinsic Motivation is “engaging in a task for the rewards inherent in the task (slide 2).” ie: time spent playing with the target activity (Deci and Moller, 2005, p.584) Extrinsic Motivation is “engaging in a task for the rewards outside of the task (slide 2).” ie: students are given rewards for doing well on high stakes tests (Ryan, 2010, p. 1) NOTE: To change images on this slide, select a picture and delete it. Then click the Insert Picture icon in the placeholder to insert your own image. Jones, B. & Chittum, J. (2013). Learning and Cognition EDEP Intrinsic Motivation PowerPoint, Slide 12.

8 MUSIC Model: Motivation eMpowermentUsefulnessSuccess InterestCaring Jones, B. (2009). Motivating Students to Engage in Learning: The MUSIC Model of Academic Motivation. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, Volume 21. Retrieved from

9 eMpowerment “Empowerment refers to the amount of perceived control that students have over their learning (Jones, B., 2009, p. 273).” Choosing partners, contributing to class questions, pace of lessons, opportunities to express opinions, rationale of rules, contributing to classroom rules Jones, B. (2009). Motivating Students to Engage in Learning: The MUSIC Model of Academic Motivation. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, Volume 21. Retrieved from

10 Usefulness “Instructors should ensure that students understand why the content is useful. (Jones, B., 2009, p. 275).” Explain relevance to interests and goals, incorporate activities that demonstrate usefulness of the content both in their future career and in the real world Jones, B. (2009). Motivating Students to Engage in Learning: The MUSIC Model of Academic Motivation. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, Volume 21. Retrieved from

11 Success “Instructors should design all aspects of courses such that students can succeed if they obtain the knowledge and skills and put forth the effort required. Students need to believe that if they invest effort into the course, they can succeed. (Jones, B., 2009, p. 276).” Make expectations clear, provide clear directions, provide challenging learning activities, divide activities into manageable sections, order activities easiest to hardest, use formative learning, encourage short-term goals, allow students to re-do assignments, provide help for struggling students, give accurate and honest feedback, set high but reasonable expectations, provide a variety of assignments Jones, B. (2009). Motivating Students to Engage in Learning: The MUSIC Model of Academic Motivation. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, Volume 21. Retrieved from

12 Interest “Instructors should ensure that their classroom activities and/or course topics are interesting to students. (Jones, B., 2009, p. 277).” Include one or more: novelty, food, social interaction, games and puzzles, fantasy, humor, narrative, or physical activities, relate content to students’ background knowledge/interests, activities evoking emotion, vary presentation style, include surprising information, show interest in and enthusiasm for course material, provide time for students to ask questions outside of class Jones, B. (2009). Motivating Students to Engage in Learning: The MUSIC Model of Academic Motivation. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, Volume 21. Retrieved from

13 Caring “Instructors should demonstrate to students that they care about whether students successfully meet the course objectives. (Jones, B., 2009, p. 279). Show concern for student successes and failures, listen to and value students’ opinions and ideas, devote time and energy to help students, consider accommodations for extenuating circumstances, show concern and interest in students’ lives, use cooperative or collaborative learning, design activities that allow students to get to know each other on a personal level Jones, B. (2009). Motivating Students to Engage in Learning: The MUSIC Model of Academic Motivation. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, Volume 21. Retrieved from

14 Suggestions for Implementation According to Dr. Brett Jones (2009, p. 280), instructors should: take time to decide how to best implement the components focus on a few components, but consider all five, the first time keep notes about success of instruction and make adjustments as needed be willing to try new and successful instructional strategies recommended by colleagues enjoy the process! Jones, B. (2009). Motivating Students to Engage in Learning: The MUSIC Model of Academic Motivation. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, Volume 21. Retrieved from

15 MUSIC Model of Academic Motivation Inventory Used to measure the five primary components of the MUSIC Model K-12 version is shorter than the version used with college aged students To use it, mix the items randomly and do not include the title of the scales (empowerment, usefulness, etc.) on the inventory To score it, average the values from each item in the scale to produce a mean for the scale *Could be used as a pre- and post- test for students to assess motivation in career development over a year (accountability)

16 Summary eMpowerment: he or she has control of his or her learning environment in the course Usefulness: the coursework is useful to his or her future Success: he or she can succeed at the coursework Interest (situational): the instructional methods and coursework are interesting or enjoyable Caring (academic and personal): the instructor cares about the student’s well-being Jones, B.D., & Wilkins, J.L.M. (2013, May). Validity evidence for the use of a motivation inventory with middle school students. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Society for the Study of Motivation, Washington D.C.

17 What are your impressions of the MUSIC Model? Discussion NOTE: To change images on this slide, select a picture and delete it. Then click the Insert Picture icon in the placeholder to insert your own image.

18 Motivation in Action…? Economics Teacher Ferris Bueller’s Day Off Teaching Style What parts of the MUSIC Model does Ben Stein’s character use? What are some examples?

19 Motivation in Action…? Dr. Eric Mazur, Physics Professor at Harvard University Teaching Style What parts of the MUSIC Model does Dr. Mazur use? What are some examples?

20 Group Activity Groups of 3-4 people Read scenario Which components of the MUSIC Model are present in the situation? To what extent? Which components of the MUSIC Model are not present in the situation? What are your suggestions for how to “add” them? Discussion

21 VIEW Resources Supporting Increased Motivation When Will I Ever Use This? connects classroom learning to careers What are Your Choices? informs students about their opportunities/choices post high- school Explore Career Choices lets students create a project of their choice to research a career A Job for Me has students look up careers they are interested in and imagine/write about what that career would be like Where Will You be in 8 Years? requires students to research what their life will be like in 8 years in a chosen career Plans for the Future helps students make the connections between the classes they are taking and how it will help them in the future TO ENGAGE PARENTS in the Career Development Process: Elementary Parent Guide to College and Career Readiness/Middle School Parent Guide to College and Career Readiness EXPLANATION OF College and Career Readiness and Economic Competitiveness CHECK OUT the Academic and Career Plan Toolkit and the College and Career Readiness Toolkit for more explanations of and information about state and federal initiatives

22 NOTE: To change images on this slide, select a picture and delete it. Then click the Insert Picture icon in the placeholder to insert your own image.

23 Emily Fielder Virginia Career VIEW


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