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The changes to Post-16 education and the implications for student guidance CAP Conference 18 th September 2014.

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Presentation on theme: "The changes to Post-16 education and the implications for student guidance CAP Conference 18 th September 2014."— Presentation transcript:

1 The changes to Post-16 education and the implications for student guidance CAP Conference 18 th September 2014

2 Content of presentation The context of recent reviews – the big picture Where we are now with developments What aspects still have to be finalised The possible implications for Post-16 providers The possible implications for HE progression The proposed changes to A levels and their implications for providers–

3 Future of A Levels – Steve Dann

4 Study Programmes Alison Wolf’s review in 2011 outlined the need for a broader and more individualised curriculum offer for year olds Change in funding to allow providers to create flexible programmes based around 600 GLH rather than on quantity of qualifications Future of A Levels – Steve Dann

5 Academic, Applied General and Technical qualifications Future of A Levels – Steve Dann Classification and statement of purpose

6 Future of A Levels – Steve Dann

7 The Govean view Exams are the most rigorous form of assessment Coursework is unreliable Modular learning is not deep learning and encourages students to discard key knowledge Opportunities to re-sit exams devalue the qualification Universities should have a say on appropriate content Future of A Levels – Steve Dann

8 Which means… 1. Review of the STRUCTURE 2. Review of the ASSESSMENT 3. Review of the CONTENT Each with separate input, consultation & phased introduction Future of A Levels – Steve Dann

9 Applied General – list published Sept 2015, to start 2016 To be recognised as an Applied General qualification and be compared to others in official performance tables, a qualification must: Be a level 3 qualification (ie, the same as A levels) Provide broad study of a vocational area without being linked to a specific occupation & have the official backing of 3 universities Main changes are to assessment Increased rigour – reduced ‘revisiting or upgrading’ opportunities Increased external assessment Future of A Levels – Steve Dann

10 Purpose of A Levels Future of A Levels – Steve Dann

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12 And the rest? Future of some current A Levels after the Second Phase is in doubt All ‘legacy’ AS qualifications and A levels will be withdrawn or reformed If they are withdrawn, this will be from 2017 (meaning the last award will be 2018). If they’re reformed, they’ll be for first teaching in 2017 (meaning the first award will be in 2019). Future of A Levels – Steve Dann

13 Structure - AS and A Level ‘de-coupling’ Future of A Levels – Steve Dann AS 200 UMS Jan and June exam A2 200 UMS Jan and June exam AS A Grade = 80% of 200 (160 UMS) A2 E Grade = 40% of 400 (160 UMS) Introduction of A* - applies only to A2

14 The new structure A Level Reform – Steve Dann14 A Level – 2 Years Linear assessment – all content covered must be assessed in the second year Coursework would be in the second year AS Level 1 Year Separate qualification – marks do not build to A Level Exam at the end of 1 year Content must be capable of co-teaching with A Level

15 Assessment - Rigour not standards “The grading standard of the new A levels and AS qualifications will not be different from that of the current versions and despite the changes, we are proposing A levels and AS qualifications will remain substantially the same qualifications as at present. The exam boards that are already recognised to award A levels and AS qualifications will therefore continue to be recognised to award the new versions of the qualifications.” (OFQUAL) The proposed changes to A levels and their implications for providers–

16 Key Changes - Assessment SubjectCurrent % courseworkNewAdditional assessment Biology20–30%100% examYes of practical skills Chemistry20–30%100% examYes of practical skills Physics20–30%100% examYes of practical skills PsychologyNone100% examNo English Language15–40%80% exam, 20% non-examNo English Literature15–40%80% exam, 20% non-examNo English Lang. and Literature15–40%80% exam, 20% non-examNo History15–20%80% exam, 20% non-examNo GeographyNone80% exam, 20% non-examNo Art and design100%100% non-examNo BusinessNone100% examNo Computing15–40%80% exam, 20% non-examNo EconomicsNone100% examNo SociologyNone100% examNo The proposed changes to A levels and their implications for providers–

17 Assessment – question types “Taken together, assessments should include questions or tasks which allow learners to: (a) provide extended responses (b) demonstrate their ability to draw together different areas of knowledge, skills and/or understanding from across a full course of study for that qualification, and that learners are appropriately rewarded for doing so.” “An ‘extended response’ is evidence generated by a Learner which is of sufficient length to allow that Learner to demonstrate the ability to construct and develop a sustained line of reasoning which is coherent, relevant, comprehensive and logically structured.” The proposed changes to A levels and their implications for providers–

18 Key Changes - Content Computing now ‘Computer Science’ – computational thinking skills English Literature – A level requires study of a minimum of 8 texts: at least 3 pre-1900 works (1 Shakespeare play); a post-2000 work; unseen text – AS 4 texts, one pre-1900 Geography – ‘coursework’ added; new annex of quantitative skills History – A level students to study topics from a chronological range of at least 200 years (including one 100-year period); 20% British Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Psychology – mathematical requirements revised with exemplifications; appendix of requirements for working scientifically The proposed changes to A levels and their implications for providers–

19 Content - A Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) The ALCAB will seek to advise and inform Ofqual of the views of Russell Group institutions, and others within the Higher Education Sector, on the content of A levels. The guidance from this group will focus on the subjects categorised by the Russell Group as facilitating for entry to leading universities. Its first task will be to review Maths, Further Maths and Languages It will contribute to the Ofqual annual review of A levels. Facilitating subjects to be reviewed by ALCAB MathematicsPhysics Further MathematicsGeography English LiteratureHistory BiologyModern Languages ChemistryClassical Languages The proposed changes to A levels and their implications for providers–

20 Possible changes to the curriculum offer and its delivery – Study Programmes Possible approaches by providers to AS/A level: 1. Carry on as at present, with students being entered for 4 AS levels at the end of year 1 and taking their best 3 for A level 2. Students to take 4 subjects in year 1 and be entered at AS for the subject they intend to drop 3. Students to take 3 subjects at A level and none at AS Additional – EPQ, Core Maths, GCSE Maths/English The proposed changes to A levels and their implications for providers–

21 Implications for Higher Education progression – loss of AS Biggest impact for University of Cambridge which uses UMS from AS levels to inform selection Other universities use them as part of a broad range of evidence, placing a varying amount of importance on them Universities may look more at GCSE performance – changes to these may make them less clear as predictors The proposed changes to A levels and their implications for providers–

22 Implications for Higher Education Expectations of programme size – 3 and a half or 3 A Levels Accuracy of predicted grades Review of UCAS Tariff – AS proposed as 40% of A Level Status of Facilitating Subjects, other A Levels, non-A Levels? Future of A Levels – Steve Dann


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