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Texas Government 2306 Unit 3 Unit 3 1789 VOTING REQUIREMENTS (set by the states)  White  Male  Property Owner  Religious Requirements (in 7-8.

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Presentation on theme: "Texas Government 2306 Unit 3 Unit 3 1789 VOTING REQUIREMENTS (set by the states)  White  Male  Property Owner  Religious Requirements (in 7-8."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Texas Government 2306 Unit 3

3 Unit 3

4 1789 VOTING REQUIREMENTS (set by the states)  White  Male  Property Owner  Religious Requirements (in 7-8 states) Percent eligible to vote: 5%Percent eligible to vote: 5%

5 VOTING REQUIREMENTS TODAY 1. U.S. CITIZEN1. U.S. CITIZEN 2. AGE—182. AGE—18 3. RESIDENCY REQUIREMENT3. RESIDENCY REQUIREMENT 30 days in Texas 30 days in Texas 4. MUST BE REGISTERED4. MUST BE REGISTERED

6 Disenfranchised by State Law

7 Texas Voter Turnout How Texas Ranks Percentage of Eligible Voters that are Registered to Vote Texas is 41st Percentage of Eligible Voters that Vote Texas is 44th

8 General Elections Average Turnout

9 Turnout in State General Elections-1990

10 Turnout –Presidential Elections – (Percentage of Voting-Age Population Voting)

11 Voter Turnout Nonpresidential Elections

12 Reasons for Low Voting Turnout in Texas  Traditionalistic Political Culture  History of Being a One-Party State  Socio-Economic Factors –o Income –o Education –o Percent of Minority Population  Bible-Belt Influence  Past Voting Barriers

13 Voting Barriers in Texas Poll Tax ( )Poll Tax ( ) White Primary ( )White Primary ( ) Restrictions on Military (until 1965)Restrictions on Military (until 1965) Long Residency Requirement-State: 1 year & County: 6 months (until )Long Residency Requirement-State: 1 year & County: 6 months (until ) Property Ownership-Local & Bond Elections (until 1969)Property Ownership-Local & Bond Elections (until 1969) Annual Registration (until 1971)Annual Registration (until 1971) Early Registration-Jan. 31 (until 1971)Early Registration-Jan. 31 (until 1971)

14 NOMINATION PROCESS PARTY CAUCUSPARTY CAUCUS –Used from s –Party leaders chose party candidates PARTY CONVENTIONPARTY CONVENTION –Used from 1830s-1900 –Party delegates at party convention nominated party candidates PARTY PRIMARY PARTY PRIMARY –States began using in early 1900s –Voters chose party candidates

15 TYPES OF PRIMARIES 1 CLOSEDCLOSED Declare party affiliation when register –Voters must vote in that party’s primary OPEN –Allows voter to vote in either party primary without a party declaration BLANKET/MIXEDBLANKET/MIXED –Lists all candidates of all parties on one ballot –Voters allowed to vote for only one candidate per position, but may switch parties between offices

16 TYPES OF PRIMARIES 2 TEXAS TYPETEXAS TYPE - Voters declare party affiliation on day of party primary, not before –Voters must then vote in that party’s primary Is a type of closed primary BUT operates more like an open primaryIs a type of closed primary BUT operates more like an open primary

17 BALLOT TYPES ORAL BALLOTORAL BALLOT – Voter gave candidate choices to election official orally PARTY BALLOTPARTY BALLOT –Ballots printed by each party listing only their party’s candidates –Ballots differed in length & sometimes paper color AUSTRALIAN (SECRET) BALLOTAUSTRALIAN (SECRET) BALLOT –Ballots printed by the government –Candidates of major parties listed on ballot

18 TWO BALLOT TYPES PARTY COLUMN Candidates listed in columns by party affiliation OFFICE COLUMN Candidates listed/grouped by office/position running for

19 Party Column Ballot

20 Office Column Ballot

21 TYPES OF VOTING  Paper Ballots o Tabulation Errorso Tabulation Errors  Punch Card Ballots o Hanging Chadso Hanging Chads  Voting Machines o Machines “Rigged” & Malfunctionso Machines “Rigged” & Malfunctions  Touch Screen Voting o Malfunctions & Lack of Paper Trailo Malfunctions & Lack of Paper Trail  On-Line Voting o Hackers, Lack of Access by Poor, No paper trailo Hackers, Lack of Access by Poor, No paper trail

22 How the US Voted in 2004

23 How the US Will Vote

24 EARLY VOTING  Begins 17 days before the election  Ends at end of 4 th day before election

25 Early Voting Timeline 60 days before Election Day - first day to submit an early voting by mail application;60 days before Election Day - first day to submit an early voting by mail application; 17 days before Election Day (12 days for May election)- early voting in person begins;17 days before Election Day (12 days for May election)- early voting in person begins; 7 days before Election Day - last day to submit an application for ballot by mail;7 days before Election Day - last day to submit an application for ballot by mail; 4 days before Election Day - early voting in person ends; Election Day- marked early ballots by mail must be returned by 7 p.m., unless mailed from outside the United States.4 days before Election Day - early voting in person ends; Election Day- marked early ballots by mail must be returned by 7 p.m., unless mailed from outside the United States.

26 EARLY VOTING BY MAIL EARLY VOTING BY MAIL YouYou may vote early by mail if you are: GoingGoing to be away from your county on Election Day and during early voting; SickSick or disabled; 6565 years of age or older on Election Day; or ConfinedConfined in jail, but eligible to vote. ApplicationsApplications for a ballot by mail mustmust be submitted to the early voting clerk on or after the 60th day before Election Day and before the close of business on the 7th day before Election Day. If the 7th day is a weekend, the last day to submit an application is the preceding Friday.

27 EARLY VOTING BY MAIL 2 If you are voting early by mail, you must send your application by:If you are voting early by mail, you must send your application by: Regular mail;Regular mail; Common or contract carrier; orCommon or contract carrier; or FAX (if a FAX machine is available to the early voting clerk and if you are submitting your application from outside the county)FAX (if a FAX machine is available to the early voting clerk and if you are submitting your application from outside the county) Exception:Exception: If you are voting early because of expected absence, you may apply in person for a ballot by mail before the first day of early voting in person.If you are voting early because of expected absence, you may apply in person for a ballot by mail before the first day of early voting in person.

28 EARLY VOTING BY MAIL 3 You may obtain a formal applicationYou may obtain a formal application from the early voting clerk in your county or from the Secretary of State's web site at or toll-free at VOTE (8683). You do not have to use a formal application; however, an informal application must be in writing and include:from the early voting clerk in your county or from the Secretary of State's web site at or toll-free at VOTE (8683). You do not have to use a formal application; however, an informal application must be in writing and include: –1. your signature (or a witness' signature if you cannot sign); –2. your name and the address at which you are registered to vote; –3. the address to which the ballot is to be mailed;

29 EARLY VOTING BY MAIL 4 The election date and for which election you are requesting a ballot (for a primary election, you must state the political party's primary in which you wish to vote); and,The election date and for which election you are requesting a ballot (for a primary election, you must state the political party's primary in which you wish to vote); and, A reason why you are eligible to vote early by mail (to be eligible to vote early due to expected absence from the county, your application must state an address out-of-county to have your ballot mailed).A reason why you are eligible to vote early by mail (to be eligible to vote early due to expected absence from the county, your application must state an address out-of-county to have your ballot mailed). The early voting clerk must receive your marked ballot by 7 p.m. on Election Day. The early voting clerk must receive your marked ballot by 7 p.m. on Election Day. Exception:Exception: –If you are mailing your ballot from outside the United States, the early voting clerk must receive your –ballot by the fifth day after Election Day. (You must mail it no later than 7 p.m. on Election Day.)

30 CURBSIDE VOTING  Don't even have to get out of the car.  Don't even have to get out of the car. –  Call ahead to notify the early voting clerk that you want to vote from your car. –  Is available to any voter who has difficulty walking or standing for long periods. –  Election official will bring your ballot to your car –  Curbside voting is available during early voting & on Election Day –  State and Federal law requires all early and Election Day polling locations to be physically accessible to voters with disabilities

31 Federal Post Card Application The Federal Post Card Application (FPCA) Federal Post Card Application The Federal Post Card Application (FPCA) Federal Post Card ApplicationFederal Post Card Application  is a form provided by federal law  to permit members of the U.S. armed forces and merchant marines, their dependents, and U.S. citizens abroad to vote early by mail and,  if necessary, to temporarily register to vote.

32 Federal Post Card Application 2 The Federal Post Card Application (FPCA) Federal Post Card ApplicationFederal Post Card Application Who is eligible?Who is eligible? You are eligible to vote early with an FPCA if you are qualified to vote in Texas and you are:You are eligible to vote early with an FPCA if you are qualified to vote in Texas and you are: a member of the U.S. armed forces or the spouse or a dependent of a member;a member of the U.S. armed forces or the spouse or a dependent of a member; a member of the U.S. merchant marines or the spouse or a dependent of a member; ora member of the U.S. merchant marines or the spouse or a dependent of a member; or a U.S. citizen domiciled in Texas but temporarily living outside the territorial limits of the United States.a U.S. citizen domiciled in Texas but temporarily living outside the territorial limits of the United States.

33 CAMPAIGN FINANCE REGULATION IN TEXAS –  Candidates must file reports with Tx. State Ethics Comm. –  Names of all donors $50+ –  Candidates & PACs-no cash contributions of $100 or more –  No direct contributions from corporations or unions –  Sworn statements of contributions & expenditures files with Texas Secretary of State –  Texas Ethics Commission=enforcer with criminal & civil penalties

34 BALLOT ACCESS (FOR INDEPENDENT & 3 RD PARTY CANDIDATES) Candidates must file a petition with a specified number of signatures of registered voters.Candidates must file a petition with a specified number of signatures of registered voters. –a. Statewide candidates: 1% of the vote for governor; –b. Multi-county candidates: to 3% of the vote for governor; –c. County or local candidates: 5% of the vote for governor Candidates must gather signatures of registered voters not voting in the primary elections of other parties in that election yearCandidates must gather signatures of registered voters not voting in the primary elections of other parties in that election year Parties whose candidate for governor received between 1 percent of the total votes cast in the last general election are exempt from the petition requirementParties whose candidate for governor received between 1 percent of the total votes cast in the last general election are exempt from the petition requirement

35 To Be Listed on Ballot The Texas Election Code provides three ways for names to appear on the ballot.: A candidate desiring to run as an independent or third party candidate must file a petition with a specified number of signatures of registered voters. The number varies, depending on whether it is a state, multi-county, or county position.A candidate desiring to run as an independent or third party candidate must file a petition with a specified number of signatures of registered voters. The number varies, depending on whether it is a state, multi-county, or county position. Statewide candidates must gather signatures of registered voters equal to 1% of the vote for governor; multi-county candidates must gather signatures of registered voters equal to 3% of the vote for governor; county or local candidates must gather signatures of registered voters equal to 5% of the vote for governor. Only registered voters not voting in the primary elections of other parties in that election year can sign the petition, a requirement that eliminates many politically active citizens.Statewide candidates must gather signatures of registered voters equal to 1% of the vote for governor; multi-county candidates must gather signatures of registered voters equal to 3% of the vote for governor; county or local candidates must gather signatures of registered voters equal to 5% of the vote for governor. Only registered voters not voting in the primary elections of other parties in that election year can sign the petition, a requirement that eliminates many politically active citizens. Write-in candidates must file as a write-in candidate and register with the Secretary of State prior to the election for their votes to be counted. Their names must be posted at the election site. Failure to register means a write-in candidate can win the largest number of votes and cannot win! Parties whose candidate for governor received between 1 and 19 percent of the total votes cast in the last general election are exempt from the petition requirement and must nominate their candidates in a party caucus or convention. Parties receiving 20 percent or more of the total votes cast for governor in the last election must nominate their candidates in primary elections. Write-in candidates must file as a write-in candidate and register with the Secretary of State prior to the election for their votes to be counted. Their names must be posted at the election site. Failure to register means a write-in candidate can win the largest number of votes and cannot win! Parties whose candidate for governor received between 1 and 19 percent of the total votes cast in the last general election are exempt from the petition requirement and must nominate their candidates in a party caucus or convention. Parties receiving 20 percent or more of the total votes cast for governor in the last election must nominate their candidates in primary elections.


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