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Bellwork Semester 2 English 3. Bell work #36 Comma (Unnecessary), Spelling, Comma (Other) Typewriters, originaly designed as writing machines for the.

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Presentation on theme: "Bellwork Semester 2 English 3. Bell work #36 Comma (Unnecessary), Spelling, Comma (Other) Typewriters, originaly designed as writing machines for the."— Presentation transcript:

1 Bellwork Semester 2 English 3

2 Bell work #36 Comma (Unnecessary), Spelling, Comma (Other) Typewriters, originaly designed as writing machines for the blind became popular in the business world in the 1880s, and created many new jobs for women. Reminder: – Label the Bell work #36 – Write the sentence and correct any problems with a pen or another colored pencil – 5-minute writing

3 Bell work #36

4 Bell work #37 Comma (Unnecessary), Quotation Marks Humorist, Mark Twain (1835–1910) wore white linen suits in summer and in winter, because they made him feel “clean in a dirty world”. Reminder: – Label the Bell work #37 – Write the sentence and correct any problems with a pen or another colored pencil – 5-minute writing

5 Bell work #37

6 Bell work #38 Colon, Quotation Marks, Comma (Appositive), Spelling, Comma (Other) Harriet Tubman, the former slave who became famous for her corage as a conductor on the Underground Railroad once made this statement “On my Underground Railroad, I never ran my train off the track and I never lost a passenger”. Reminder: – Label the Bell work #38 – Write the sentence and correct any problems with a pen or another colored pencil – 5-minute writing

7 Bell work #38

8 Bell work #39 Hyphen, Spelling, Colon, Apostrophe According to a well publicized goverment report, more than half of Americas’ new jobs will be in the following industries health services, business services, and retail trade. Reminder: – Label the Bell work #39 – Write the sentence and correct any problems with a pen or another colored pencil – 5-minute writing

9 Bell work #39

10 Bell work #40 Comma (To Separate Adjectives), Spelling, Parentheses, Comma (Other), Adverb Form Slow sustained streching helps lenghten tight cramped muscles increases flexibility and prevents muscle strains tiny tears in muscle fibers. Reminder: – Label the Bell work #40 – Write the sentence and correct any problems with a pen or another colored pencil – 5-minute writing

11 Bell work #40

12 Bell work #41 Comma (Other), Spelling, Quotation Marks The largest gold nugget ever found weighed about 200 pounds was descovered in 1969 near Ballarat Australia, and was nicknamed Welcome Stranger. Reminder: – Label the Bell work # 41 – Write the sentence and correct any problems with a pen or another colored pencil – 5-minute writing

13 Bell work #41

14 Bell work #42 Capitalization, Comma (Unnecessary), Quotation Marks, Punctuation (Title), Comma (Other), Spelling In an article for the british magazine, The Idler Helen Wilkinson writes, “Many young people critisize their managers for their “make-work” rather than “real- work” mentality.” Reminder: – Label the Bell work # 42 – Write the sentence and correct any problems with a pen or another colored pencil – 5-minute writing

15 Bell work #42

16 Bell work #43 Comma (Other), Spelling, Using the Right Word Though banks may supply “virtual” money in the form of online cash the det my dear is all to real. Reminder: – Label the Bell work #43 – Write the sentence and correct any problems with a pen or another colored pencil – 5-minute writing

17 Bell work #44 Underline any number or abbreviation used incorrectly and write the correction above. 3,000 people living in the Oak Ridge, TN, area were relocated to make way for 3 supersecret military factories. Reminder: – Label the Bell work #44 – Write the sentence and correct any problems with a pen or another colored pencil – 5-minute writing

18 Bell work #52 http://tweentribune.com/teen Facebook is so 2009 - April 3 Read the article and write for seven minutes based on the following article. 1. Every topic response must be a minimum of five(5) complete sentences in 7 minutes. 2. Each bellwork will be written on the front and back of the previous days bellwork. 3. Each bellwork must be labeled at the top left of the paper with the MLA heading and bellwork # and the topic of bellwork.

19 Facebook is so 2009 Has Facebook become less fun? That's something many users — especially those in their teens and early 20s — are asking themselves as they wade through endless posts, photos "liked" by people they barely know and spur-of-the moment friend requests. Has it all become too much of a chore? Are the important life events of your closest loved ones drowning in a sea of banana slicer jokes? "When I first got Facebook I literally thought it was the coolest thing to have. If you had a Facebook you kind of fit in better, because other people had one," says Rachel Fernandez, 18, who first signed on to the site four or five years ago. And now? "Facebook got kind of boring," she says. Chatter about Facebook's demise never seems to die down, whether it's talk of "Facebook fatigue," or grousing about how the social network lost its cool once grandma joined. But so far, for every person who has left permanently, several new people have joined up. Facebook has more than 1 billion users around the world. Of these, 618 million sign in every day. Indeed, Fernandez hasn't abandoned Facebook. Though the Traverse City, Mich., high school senior doesn't look at her News Feed, the constant cascade of posts, photos and viral videos from her nearly 1,800 friends, she still uses Facebook's messaging feature to reach out to people she knows, such as a German foreign exchange student she met two years ago. Daniel Singer is 13 and, according to his public Facebook profile, he enjoys "designing beautiful user interfaces and sitting down at my desk and creating great iOS apps." Last year, the eighth-grader created YouTell, a site that lets people ask for anonymous feedback from friends. You can use Facebook to log in, or email. As someone who designs applications, Singer calls Facebook's graphical design "brilliant." Still, he thinks the average teenager wants to see new stuff. Twitter comes to mind, along with Instagram and Pheed, a photo-text-video-audio sharing app launched last fall. For Singer, Facebook is part of a daily routine. "Kind of like brushing your teeth," he says. In early March, Facebook unveiled a big redesign to address some of its users' most pressing gripes. The retooling, which is already available to some people, is intended to get rid of the clutter that's been a complaint among Facebook users for some time. The new design seeks to address the issue. There is a distinct feed for "all friends," another for different groups of friends, one just for photos, and one for pages that users follow. As a result, the new feeds give people a way to see everything that's going on. Critical thinking challenge: What will replace Facebook?

20 Bell work #53 http://tweentribune.com/teen Zombie finds Long Island cat in Times Square Read the article and write for seven minutes based on the following article. 1. Every topic response must be a minimum of five(5) complete sentences in 7 minutes. 2. Each bellwork will be written on the front and back of the previous days bellwork. 3. Each bellwork must be labeled at the top left of the paper with the MLA heading and bellwork # and the topic of bellwork.

21 Zombie finds Long Island cat in Times Square It took a zombie to find Disaster at the Crossroads of the World. Two years after he disappeared from his Long Island home, “Disaster” the cat was found this week in the heart of Manhattan — by a Times Square haunted house promoter dressed up as a zombie. Jeremy Zelkowitz, who sells tickets for the Times Scare haunted house, spotted Disaster early Saturday morning crossing 42nd Street. He snatched up Disaster, a black and white cat who appeared to be well-kept and neat, and brought him to a nearby animal hospital. "I'm a big animal lover but I have a dog so I couldn't take him," Zelkowitz, 22, said Thursday. "The whole situation is very, very bizarre." Staff at the BluePearl Veterinary Partners animal hospital scanned Disaster who had been implanted with a microchip, revealing his last known owner: New York City police Officer Jimmy Helliesen. Helliesen, 51, received a call Saturday morning from the hospital, informing him that his long-lost feline friend had been found. "I was shocked," said Helliesen. "How did he get to Manhattan? That's quite an adventure." For years Helliesen has adopted stray cats he finds hanging around his Brooklyn precinct. Two years ago he adopted Disaster after he strayed from the precinct and ended up getting captured by local Animal Care and Control. That's when Helliesen had him implanted with the chip. But six months after living in his Long Island home, Disaster escaped one day through an open window and never returned. Helliesen never thought he'd get the cat back — and has since taken in eight more cats he's found around the precinct who need homes. "Disaster makes it nine," he said. "My wife has been very understanding.“

22 Bell work #54 http://tweentribune.com/teen Pro golfer going to prom with special needs student Read the article and write for seven minutes based on the following article. 1. Every topic response must be a minimum of five(5) complete sentences in 7 minutes. 2. Each bellwork will be written on the front and back of the previous days bellwork. 3. Each bellwork must be labeled at the top left of the paper with the MLA heading and bellwork # and the topic of bellwork.

23 Pro golfer going to prom with special needs student Golfer Belen Mozo has granted the wish of a Knoxville high school student and agreed to be his prom date. Mozo's agent, Miles Soboroff, confirmed Monday that the Spanish golfer will accompany 19-year-old Alex Notte to the Bearden High School prom on May 11. Alex, who has hearing, vision and neurological disorders, has been taking golf lessons and met Mozo two years ago at the Wegmans LPGA Championship in Rochester, N.Y. Alex's older sister, Arielle says she helped extend the invitation to Mozo by shooting a video and posting it on YouTube and Facebook. Mozo learned of the video, called Alex's mother, Kristine Notte, to confirm the invitation was for real, and then accepted it. "I was really moved when I saw the video," Belen said. "I knew immediately that I wanted to say "yes," but the only question that popped into my mind is, 'What am I going to wear?'" Mozo called him an inspiration to her and people with special needs. "What impressed me was how Alex was so determined to follow his dreams, whether it be golf or finding a prom date, and that he refuses to be defined by the challenges standing in his way," Mozo said. She said she intends to host a clinic that raises awareness and funds for Special Olympics golf.

24 Bell work #55 http://tweentribune.com/teen Arabian city gets $550,000 police car Read the article and write for seven minutes based on the following article. 1. Every topic response must be a minimum of five(5) complete sentences in 7 minutes. 2. Each bellwork will be written on the front and back of the previous days bellwork. 3. Each bellwork must be labeled at the top left of the paper with the MLA heading and bellwork # and the topic of bellwork.

25 Arabian city gets $550,000 police car In a city of boundless bling, Dubai police also are in hot pursuit after adding a nearly $550,000 Lamborghini to its fleet. Dubai is a city in the United Arab Emirates, which is located southeast of the Persian Gulf on the Arabian Peninsula. The sports car, painted in green-and-white colors of the Dubai force, will not likely be roaring after law breakers. Instead, it will be mostly dispatched to tourist areas to show — in the words of deputy police director, Gen. Khamis Matter al-Muzaina — "how classy Dubai is." Lamborghini claims the car can reach 62 mph in 2.9 seconds and a top speed of 217 mph. Local media reports Thursday say the Italian-made Lamborghini Aventador is the crown jewel of a wider upgrade in Dubai police wheels. The force also is adding some American muscle car Camaros. Dubai seeks to show it has rebounded from its debt crisis with brash plans that include the world's largest Ferris wheel and a satellite city named after the city- state's ruler.

26 Bell work #56 http://tweentribune.com/teen http://tweentribune.com/tween/columbus-overrun- lincolns http://tweentribune.com/tween/columbus-overrun- lincolns Read the article and write for seven minutes based on the following article. 1. Every topic response must be a minimum of five(5) complete sentences in 7 minutes. 2. Each bellwork will be written on the front and back of the previous days bellwork. 3. Each bellwork must be labeled at the top left of the paper with the MLA heading and bellwork # and the topic of bellwork.

27 Columbus overrun with Lincolns The 19th annual convention of the Association of Lincoln Presenters has attracted around three dozen Abes in chin beards and full regalia, along with 30 or so Mary Todd Lincolns and various other Civil War-era figures, including Gen. Ulysses S. Grant. "I tell people I think we hold this convention just so we can run around in our costumes all weekend," says John Cooper. John Cooper's obsession with being Abraham Lincoln began one score and five years ago. Its beginnings were humble. Tall, lean and bearded, the Ohio man already bore a passing resemblance to the Rail Splitter, or so he was told. One Halloween he donned a frock coat he found in his mother's attic, and his wife fashioned a stovepipe hat out of cardboard. A little spray paint on his beard, and he was ready for trick or treat with the kids. He was so convincing that before long he was invited to come to schools in costume around Presidents Day. Then people started paying him to show up at their events in character to talk about the 16th president. The rest is history. But honestly, this is a huge weekend for the 62-year-old Cooper, who is helping to host a gathering of impersonators of the Great Emancipator in Columbus. The Lincolns have a certain spring in their step this year thanks to a wave of attention brought by the Steven Spielberg movie "Lincoln," which earned an Oscar for Daniel Day-Lewis for his portrayal of Honest Abe. Some of the impersonators say the excitement has led to more work for them. They can fetch several hundred dollars and up for appearances. On Friday night, all the Lincolns planned to go to a high school in suburban Columbus to see a student production of "Our American Cousin," the play Lincoln was watching when he was shot at Ford's Theater in Washington on April 15, 1865. Organizers said the crack of a snare drum would mark the exact moment in the show when the shot was fired, and a student portraying Lincoln's wife would add a scream for dramatic effect.

28 Bell work #57 http://tweentribune.com/teen Woman adjusts to bionic hand Read the article and write for seven minutes based on the following article. 1. Every topic response must be a minimum of five(5) complete sentences in 7 minutes. 2. Each bellwork will be written on the front and back of the previous days bellwork. 3. Each bellwork must be labeled at the top left of the paper with the MLA heading and bellwork # and the topic of bellwork.

29 Bell work #58 1 of 2 Mass. bomb suspects dead; suburbs shut down http://www.politico.com/story/2013/04/watertown- police-boston-90322.html#ixzz2QucZOjKy http://www.politico.com/story/2013/04/watertown- police-boston-90322.html#ixzz2QucZOjKy Read the article and write for seven minutes based on the following article. 1. Every topic response must be a minimum of five(5) complete sentences in 7 minutes. 2. Each bellwork will be written on the front and back of the previous days bellwork. 3. Each bellwork must be labeled at the top left of the paper with the MLA heading and bellwork # and the topic of bellwork.

30 By ASSOCIATED PRESS | 4/19/13 2:02 AM EDT Updated: 4/19/13 7:43 AM EDT WATERTOWN, Mass. (AP) — Two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing killed an MIT police officer, injured a transit officer in a firefight and threw explosive devices at police during their getaway attempt in a long night of violence that left one of them dead and another still at large Friday, authorities said as the manhunt intensified for a young man described as a dangerous terrorist. The suspects were identified to The Associated Press as coming from the Russian region near Chechnya, which has been plagued by an Islamic insurgency stemming from separatist wars. A law enforcement intelligence bulletin obtained by the AP identified the surviving bomb suspect as Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev, a 19-year-old who had been living in Cambridge, just outside Boston, and said he "may be armed and dangerous.“ Two law enforcement officials told the AP that Tsarnaev and the other suspect, who was not immediately identified, had been living legally in the U.S. for at least one year. In Boston, still on edge over the attack on the marathon, and its western suburbs, authorities suspended mass transit and urged people to stay indoors as they searched for the remaining suspect, a man seen wearing a white baseball cap on surveillance footage from Monday's deadly bombing at the marathon finish line. "We believe this man to be a terrorist," said Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis. "We believe this to be a man who's come here to kill people." Authorities urged residents in Watertown, Newton, Arlington, Waltham, Belmont, Cambridge and the Allston- Brighton neighborhoods of Boston to stay indoors. At least a quarter of a million people live in those suburbs. All mass transit was shut down, and businesses were asked not to open Friday. People waiting at bus and subway stops were told to go home. The shutdown came hours after the killing of one suspect, known as the man in the black hat from marathon surveillance footage. All modes of public transportation were shut down, including buses, subways, trolleys, commuter rail and boats, said Joe Pesaturo, spokesman for the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority. The suspects' clashes with police began only a few hours after the FBI released photos and videos of the two young men, who were seen carrying backpacks as they mingled among marathon revelers. The bombings on Monday killed three people and wounded more than 180 others, and authorities revealed the images to enlist the public's help finding the suspects.

31 Bell work #59 Pinellas toddler who lost feet 'a fighter‘ http://tbo.com/pinellas-county/pinellas-toddler-who-lost-feet- goes-into-surgery-b82478460z1 http://tbo.com/pinellas-county/pinellas-toddler-who-lost-feet- goes-into-surgery-b82478460z1 Read the article and write an analysis of the two articles: bionic hand and toddler ‘a fighter’. Analysis doesn't necessarily mean that one compares two items, rather that you explore the two, find connections, and then go in depth about those connections with a focus on what you find to be the most important. 1. Must be a minimum of five(5) complete sentences in 7 minutes.

32 By Keith Morelli | Tribune Staff Published: April 15, 2013 http://tbo.com/pinellas-county/pinellas-toddler-who-lost-feet-goes-into-surgery-b82478460z1Keith Morelli | Tribune Staff TAMPA - Optimism gushed from the parents of a 2-year-old Palm Harbor girl who underwent four hours of surgery Monday after losing her feet last week in a lawnmower accident. “She's a fighter,” said Ireland Nugent's mother, Nicole, at a news conference at Tampa General Hospital after the toddler came out of surgery Monday afternoon. “She's feisty. If she wants to do something, she'll do it. She's doing that here. Fighting. Fighting. Fighting.” The cherubic little girl remained sedated and probably won't regain consciousness until Tuesday. That was a letdown for her parents, who wanted to talk to her, hug her and tell her they loved her. “That was a disappointment,” Nicole Nugent said. The horrific accident and plight of the little girl has drawn national attention. A fund established to help offset the medical costs, which could pile up for years with rehabilitation and prosthetics, swelled to about $20,000, said the Rev. Dennis Reid, pastor of Trinity Presbyterian Church. He is acting as a spokesman for the family. Her surgery Monday is the last one before she can begin recovery and get fitted for prosthetic legs below her knees, Reid said. Parts of her legs below the calf were amputated, and skin from her thighs was grafted to her injuries, he said. Friends and members of the church crowded into the waiting room to offer support. “It's been a long day for the family,” he said. “But the surgery was very successful.” Nicole Nugent said she was surprised by the outpouring of support. “It's beyond anything I could have imagined,” she said. “We're not famous, we're just people. The world really isn't as bad as you think it is.” Former professional wrestler Steve Chamberland, a Largo fitness trainer who runs 50 Legs, a charity that provides state-of-the- art prosthetics to children, has pledged to help, saying he hopes the family doesn't pay anything out of pocket for prosthetics or rehabilitation. “This family has become a part of my family,” he said. A golf tournament organized by 50 Legs is slated for April 27 at Tarpon Woods Golf Club in Palm Harbor. The family has insurance but still will incur medical expenses due to the hospital stay and years of care in the future. There are several places to make donations. The Pinellas Federal Credit Union has established a fund in Ireland's name, and donations can be made at www.pinellasfcu.org or by calling (727) 586-4422 during business hours. Trinity Presbyterian Church also is taking donations at www.trinityclearwater.com. The surgery was a big step on the road to recovery for the little girl. “I can't wait to love and hold her,” said her father, Jerry, his voice giving way to emotion, “and tell her it's going to be OK.”www.trinityclearwater.com

33 Bell work #60 http://tweentribune.com/teen Wanna use your phone at school? No problem! Read the article and write for seven minutes based on the following article. 1. Every topic response must be a minimum of five(5) complete sentences in 7 minutes. 2. Each bellwork will be written on the front and back of the previous days bellwork. 3. Each bellwork must be labeled at the top left of the paper with the MLA heading and bellwork # and the topic of bellwork.

34 Wanna use your phone at school? No problem! Students in two Tennessee schools are no longer trying to hide their cell phones in backpacks or desks — they have them out in the open. Administrators across the country have now realized the best way to put a stop to the improper use of technology is to loosen up the reins. Students at Hampshire Unit School and Spring Hill High School are encouraged bring tablets, laptops, netbooks, smart phones and E-readers twice a week, but they are only allowed to use them for educational purposes. While administrators at the unit school had originally planned to include upper grade levels the concept is actually workable for every grade level from the second grade up to seniors. Second graders are just getting used to the tech, but they are already able to incorporate spelling apps they can spend time on when they finish other assignments. Seventh-graders are encouraged to have their phones out to use them in conjunction with other learning methods to complete their assignments. Students can use them pretty much whenever they want, as long as they’re getting the work done. So far, the students said they’re using digital flash cards or notebooks to complement their studies. Teachers offer up educational games as an incentive to work efficiently. Eighth-graders use their phones in reading class to take real time quizzes. Fourth graders can play games on their phones and have done everything from looking up definitions to checking facts on U.S. presidents. One student said based on one of his geography lessons, he plans to visit the Great Wall of China and the Taj Mahal someday, just by seeing pictures on his tablet. “It helps me a lot because you can get on websites, and it doesn’t seem like learning,” said fourth-grader Julie Henley. “But you are.”

35 Bell work #61 http://tweentribune.com/teen How can a seat cost more than $70,000,000? Read the article and write an analysis of the two articles: $550,000 police car and $70,000,000 seat Analysis doesn't necessarily mean that one compares two items, rather that you explore the two, find connections, and then go in depth about those connections with a focus on what you find to be the most important. 1. Must be a minimum of five(5) complete sentences in 7 minutes.

36 How can a seat cost more than $70,000,000? NASA will pay $424 million to Russia to get six astronauts into space. That's $70.6 million per seat — well above the previous price tag of about $65 million. So the cost of getting out of this world makes each seat the most expensive in this world. Russia currently provides the only means of getting people to and from the space station, and its prices have soared with each new contract. Several U.S. companies are working on rockets and spacecraft to launch Americans from U.S. soil. But that's still a few years away. The ability to launch crews into orbit from America ended with NASA's shuttle program in 2011. NASA says if Congress had approved the space agency's request for more funding for its commercial space effort, the latest contract would have been unnecessary. "Because the funding for the President's plan has been significantly reduced, we now won't be able to support American launches until 2017," said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden.

37 Bell work #62 http://tweentribune.com/teen Giant rubber duck makes big splash in Hong Kong Read the article and write for seven minutes based on the following article. 1. Every topic response must be a minimum of five(5) complete sentences in 7 minutes. 2. Each bellwork will be written on the front and back of the previous days bellwork. 3. Each bellwork must be labeled at the top left of the paper with the MLA heading and bellwork # and the topic of bellwork.

38 A giant rubber duck created by Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman is towed along Hong Kong's Victoria Habour. A six-story-high rubber duck is making a big splash in Hong Kong. Crowds watched the inflatable duck being pulled by tugboat across Victoria Harbor in front of Hong Kong's signature skyscraper skyline. Tourist Zhang Wenjin from Shanghai says it's a big surprise. "This is huge. My daughter liked it when she saw it just now. Because kids like cute stuff." Yu Kwan Yee of Hong Kong was part of the crowd. "The duckie is swimming," the 2-year-old said. Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman created the bright-yellow duck, and it was built of PVC material in New Zealand by a company specializing in large sails. Hofman was on hand as the duck arrived and said it later had to be deflated because high winds and waves created a "big challenge." The duck has been transported around the world since 2007, bringing a message of peace and harmony. It has previously been to Osaka, Japan, Sydney, Sao Paulo, Auckland, New Zealand, and Amsterdam. It will be anchored at a Hong Kong terminal for display until June.

39 Bell work #63 http://tweentribune.com/teen Prepare to be swarmed by billions of red-eyed bugs! Read the article and write for seven minutes based on the following article. 1. Every topic response must be a minimum of five(5) complete sentences in 7 minutes. 2. Each bellwork will be written on the front and back of the previous days bellwork. 3. Each bellwork must be labeled at the top left of the paper with the MLA heading and bellwork # and the topic of bellwork.

40 Prepare to be swarmed by billions of red-eyed bugs! Any day now, billions of cicadas with bulging red eyes will crawl out of the earth after 17 years underground and overrun the East Coast. The insects will arrive in such numbers that people from North Carolina to Connecticut will be outnumbered roughly 600-to-1. Maybe more. Even if it's merely 30 billion, if they were lined up head to tail, they'd reach the moon and back. But as ominous as that sounds, the insects are harmless. They won't hurt you or other animals. At worst, they might damage a few saplings or young shrubs. Mostly they will blanket certain pockets of the region, though lots of people won't ever see them. "It's not like these hordes of cicadas draw blood or zombify people," says May Berenbaum, a University of Illinois entomologist. Since 1996, this group of 1-inch bugs, has been a few feet underground, eating tree roots and biding their time. They will emerge only when the ground temperature reaches precisely 64 degrees. After a few weeks up in the trees, they will die and their offspring will go underground, not to return until 2030. And they will make a big racket, too. In 2004, a scientist in Cincinnati measured cicadas at 94 decibels, saying it was so loud "you don't hear planes flying overhead." These are no ordinary cicadas that come out every year around the world. They're called magicicadas — as in magic — and are red-eyed. And these magicicadas are seen only in the eastern half of the United States, nowhere else in the world.

41 Double amputee Jason Koger of Owensboro, Ky., demonstrates his i-limb ultra revolution hands decorated with images of his children, May 2, 2013, in Philadelphia. Koger, a husband and father of three who lost his limbs in an accident, can now activate with an iPhone app 24 different grip patterns for his new hands. Matt Rourke/AP

42 Bell work #64 http://tweentribune.com/teen Student expelled over science project gone wrong Read the article and write for seven minutes based on the following article. 1. Every topic response must be a minimum of five(5) complete sentences in 7 minutes. 2. Each bellwork will be written on the front and back of the previous days bellwork. 3. Each bellwork must be labeled at the top left of the paper with the MLA heading and bellwork # and the topic of bellwork.

43 Student expelled over science project gone wrong A 16-year-old student called a "good kid" by her principal will be tried as an adult on two felony charges after conducting what her classmates called "a science project gone wrong." Kiera Wilmot of Bartow High School in Bartow, Florida, was mixing household chemicals in a plastic bottle on school grounds when the ingredients suddenly interacted in a negative way, causing the top of the bottle to fly off and smoke to billow from the bottle. No damage was caused and no injuries were sustained. The school's resource officer held Wilmot until the police arrived and charged her with possession/discharge of a weapon on school grounds and discharging a destructive device. She was then handcuffed and taken to a juvenile assessment center. According to Wilmot she was conducting a science experiment, but her teacher told police she did not assign such a project. Principal Ron Pritchard, however, backed Wilmot up, telling WTSP, "She wanted to see what would happen [when the chemicals mixed] and was shocked by what it did," adding "honestly, I don’t think she meant to ever hurt anyone." Wilmot was expelled just the same, and will now "be forced to complete her diploma through an expulsion program," according to the Miami New Times. The school district has since released a statement saying it had no choice but to "uphold our code of conduct rules" in order "to maintain a safe and orderly learning environment " The statement continued: "We urge our parents to join us in conveying the message that there are consequences to actions. We will not compromise the safety and security of our students and staff."

44 Bell work #65 http://news.yahoo.com/teen-texting-wheel-tied- more-driving-risks-042104975.html http://news.yahoo.com/teen-texting-wheel-tied- more-driving-risks-042104975.html Teen texting at the wheel tied to more driving risks Read the article and write for seven minutes based on the following article. 1. Every topic response must be a minimum of five(5) complete sentences in 7 minutes. 2. Each bellwork will be written on the front and back of the previous days bellwork. 3. Each bellwork must be labeled at the top left of the paper with the MLA heading and bellwork # and the topic of bellwork.

45 By Genevra Pittman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Teenagers who text while driving are also more likely to engage in other risky activities, such as riding with an intoxicated driver or not wearing a seatbelt, a new study suggests. Researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found four in every nine high school students had sent or received texts while driving in the past month. "Considering it's against the law for teens to be texting while driving in 45 states, it's a little concerning," said Emily Olsen, a health statistician in the CDC's Division of Adolescent and School Health and the report's lead author. Past studies conducted in single states have found anywhere from one quarter to almost three quarters of teenagers text while driving, the study team wrote Monday in Pediatrics. To get a more nationally representative picture, Olsen and her colleagues analyzed responses to the CDC's annual youth risk survey. On the 2011 survey, conducted in public and private schools across the country, 8,505 high school students ages 16 and older were asked about potentially dangerous driving behaviors they had engaged in over the past month. Just under 45 percent had texted while driving at least once during that span, and close to 12 percent of teens said they texted behind the wheel every day. Although the study team didn't measure how cell phone use may have affected safety in the car, past research shows that texting while driving can slow reaction times and impair a driver's ability to stay in one lane.

46 The more frequently students reported texting and driving, the more likely they were to also answer "yes" to other risky behaviors, the researchers found. For example, 3 percent of teens who didn't text at the wheel had recently driven after drinking alcohol. That compared to 19 percent who reported texting and driving at least once in the past month and 34 percent who said they texted in the car daily. Likewise, 19 percent of non-texters had ridden in a car with another driver who had been drinking, versus 33 percent of high school students who reported texting and driving themselves. "It's concerning that kids are participating in these multiple behaviors, either while they're driving or while they're a passenger," Olsen told Reuters Health. "Each one of these things is quite dangerous (on its own)." Jessica Mirman, who has studied teen motor vehicle cell phone use at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's Center for Injury Research and Prevention, agreed. "That just really highlighted that as far as prevention goes, we really need something comprehensive," Mirman, who wasn't involved in the new research, told Reuters Health. "It's not just about texting. It's not just about drinking." Olsen said parents have the best chance of being able to curb unsafe activities in the car by continuing to talk with their children about safe driving even after they have their license. Teens, she pointed out, are already more likely to get into - and have trouble getting out of - dangerous situations on the road, due to their inexperience. "Anything that takes their attention away from the task of driving, it can wait," she said. Parents who are worried about their teens' driving behavior should reach out to their pediatrician or a school counselor, Mirman advised, as that risk-taking might reflect other underlying problems.

47 Bell work #66 http://www.cleanvideosearch.com/media/action/ yt/watch?v=gFki-JW_WmU http://www.cleanvideosearch.com/media/action/ yt/watch?v=gFki-JW_WmU Read the article and write an analysis of the two articles: Teen texting at the wheel tied to more driving risks and Teens texting and driving video Analysis doesn't necessarily mean that one compares two items, rather that you explore the two, find connections, and then go in depth about those connections with a focus on what you find to be the most important. 1. Must be a minimum of five(5) complete sentences in 7 minutes.

48 Bell work #67 http://tweentribune.com/teen Eat an insect. Save the world. Read the article and write for seven minutes based on the following article. 1. Every topic response must be a minimum of five(5) complete sentences in 7 minutes. 2. Each bellwork will be written on the front and back of the previous days bellwork. 3. Each bellwork must be labeled at the top left of the paper with the MLA heading and bellwork # and the topic of bellwork.

49 Eat an insect. Save the world. The latest weapon in the fight against hunger, global warming and pollution might be flying by you right now. Edible insects are being promoted as a low-fat, high-protein food for people, pets and livestock. They come with appetizing side benefits: Reducing greenhouse gas emissions and livestock pollution, creating jobs in developing countries and feeding the millions of hungry people in the world. Who eats insects now? Two billion people do, largely in Asia, Africa and Latin America, according to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization. Some insects may already be in your food (and this is no fly-in-my-soup joke). Demand for natural food coloring as opposed to artificial dyes is increasing, the agency's experts say. A red coloring produced from the cochineal, a scaled insect often exported from Peru, already puts the color in a popular brand of strawberry yogurt. Packed with protein. Full of fiber. Scientists who have studied the nutritional value of edible insects have found that red ants, small grasshoppers and some water beetles pack enough protein to rank with lean ground beef while having less fat per gram. Bored with bran as a source of fiber in your diet? Edible insects can oblige, and they also contain useful minerals such as iron, magnesium, phosphorous, selenium and zinc. With so many insects to choose from, how do you pick? Beetles and caterpillars are the most common meals among the more than 1,900 edible insect species that people eat. Other popular insect foods are bees, wasps, ants, grasshoppers, locusts and crickets. Less popular are termites and flies, according to U.N. data. Bugs = cash Edible insects are a money-maker. In Africa, four big water bottles filled with grasshoppers can fetch a gatherer $20. Some caterpillars in southern Africa and weaver ant eggs in Southeast Asia are considered delicacies and command high prices

50 Bell work #68 http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/places/culture- places/food/us_insects/ http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/places/culture- places/food/us_insects/ Food: Eating Insects Read the article and write an analysis of the two articles: Food: Eating Insects and Eat an insect. Save the world. Analysis doesn't necessarily mean that one compares two items, rather that you explore the two, find connections, and then go in depth about those connections with a focus on what you find to be the most important. 1. Must be a minimum of five(5) complete sentences in 7 minutes.

51 Bell work #69 http://www.techlearning.com/Default.aspx?tabid=67&entryid=5812 From the Principal's Office: Teaching Active Reputation Management: 5 Steps for Sanitizing Facebook Accounts Read the article and write for seven minutes based on the following article. 1. Every topic response must be a minimum of five(5) complete sentences in 7 minutes. 2. Each bellwork will be written on the front and back of the previous days bellwork. 3. Each bellwork must be labeled at the top left of the paper with the MLA heading and bellwork # and the topic of bellwork.

52 “ Collectively, all of the digital content you create, and that others create about you, becomes your online reputation. And today, that’s the reputation that matters the most.” Matt Ivester, lol…OMG! What Every Student Needs to Know about Online Reputation Management, Digital Citizenship and Cyberbullying In his book, lol...OMG! What Every Student Needs to Know about Online Reputation Management, Digital Citizenship and Cyberbullying, Matt Ivester repeatedly cautions high school students that “What we do in the digital world often lasts forever,” and that they need to take whatever actions necessary to engage in “Active Reputation Management.” That "Active Reputation Management" includes both proactive measures students can use to keep from sharing content harmful to their reputations, and it also includes measures that students can use to "sanitize" or clean-up damaging content already posted. While it is true that once something is shared online, it is probably permanent, that does not mean students can't make an effort to sanitize their shared content that could give college admissions officers and future employers the wrong impression. In doing that, Ivester offers students some sound advice. That advice is: Begin today cleaning up all the online accounts and services where you have shared and created content, starting with your Facebook account. Facebook Sanitation Process (Can be used for other content sharing sites too.) 1. Review your profile information. Remove anything that might reflect on you in a negative way with future employers and college admission officers. View the information from the perspective of a potential employer or college admissions officer. Or, as Ivester suggests, have a trusted teacher or another adult review the content. Information shared in a social media profile can create an impression of you that you don't want others to have just as much as the content you have shared. 2. Examine all the pages that you have liked, and disassociate yourself from those that might reflect on you personally in a negative manner. For example, if you have "liked" a page that reflects values or beliefs that are discriminatory, someone looking at that might view you as having that same inclination. The pages we "like" on Facebook communicate a message about us as much as the content we share.

53 3. Examine all other pages associated with your account and remove those associations or pages that reflect on you negatively or have the potential to give improper perceptions. Careful examination of any additional pages you have created in Facebook is a must. Make sure that none of those reflect values that give visitors to your page the wrong impression about you as a person. 4. Review all your photos and videos. Purge those that might be misunderstood or reflect on you in a negative manner. For example, many young people post pictures of themselves having fun at a party or at the beach. If in one of the photos or videos they are acting foolishly or holding an alcohol product, a potential employer or college admissions officer might get the wrong impression. 5. Go back and review your timeline from the start. Remove any posts that can be misunderstood or reflects on you in a negative manner. This is important. Everyone should go back and review their Facebook timeline from time to time, and do so with a critical eye. While we like to think what we share there is only seen by our "friends," we know that once posted, it can be shared with others we don't know. In that manner, a comment we made 3 years ago might come back to haunt us with a future employer or college admissions officer. As Ivester suggests, active reputation management involves reviewing the content created and viewing that content from the perspective of others. As 21st century educators we can and should teach students how to manage their online reputations. With these five steps, students can begin the process by sanitizing their Facebook accounts, and in turn begin the process of repairing their online reputations. Then, these same five steps can be repeated for all personal content sharing sites too. This is one way to ensure that their youthful indiscretions do not negatively impact their futures. On a side note, Matt Ivester's book is an excellent resource for high school students. Using real examples, he takes students through all the ways sharing content can cause consequences they would rather avoid. Then, he gives them strategies they can use to both proactively and actively manage their online reputations and lives. This book might make an excellent graduation gift.

54 Bell work #70 http://tweentribune.com/teen Would you pay $668,000 for a wooden Apple? Read the article and write for seven minutes based on the following article. 1. Every topic response must be a minimum of five(5) complete sentences in 7 minutes. 2. Each bellwork will be written on the front and back of the previous days bellwork. 3. Each bellwork must be labeled at the top left of the paper with the MLA heading and bellwork # and the topic of bellwork.

55 Apple founders Steve Wosniak, left and Steve Jobs, right. One of Apple's first computers — a functioning 1976 model — has been sold for a record $668,000. A German auction house sold the so-called “Apple 1” to an Asian client, who asked not to be named. It had been build by the tech company's founders Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak in a family garage. It is one of only six known remaining functioning models in the world. Another was sold last year for $635,000. It says the computer bears Wozniak's signature. An old business transaction letter from the late Jobs also was included. The Apple 1, which was sold for $666 in 1976, consisted of only the circuit board. A case, a keyboard and a screen had to be bought separately.

56 Bell work #71 Opinion – What bellworks did you like the best? Writing prompt Grammar correction Greek and Latin root words Current article summary and analysis Write for seven minutes based on the following article. 1. Every topic response must be a minimum of five(5) complete sentences in 7 minutes. 2. Each bellwork will be written on the front and back of the previous days bellwork. 3. Each bellwork must be labeled at the top left of the paper with the MLA heading and bellwork # and the topic of bellwork.


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