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Emergency Management Handbook For Government Officials.

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Presentation on theme: "Emergency Management Handbook For Government Officials."— Presentation transcript:

1 Emergency Management Handbook For Government Officials

2 About AMEM Our Mission: AMEM is an association of professional emergency managers dedicated to advocating and advancing effective emergency management capabilities and practices statewide.

3 About AMEM Our Vision: One voice advancing individual, family, and community preparedness. Our Motto: Leading Minnesota Readiness

4 About AMEM Our 2014-2015 Leadership: PresidentEric WaageHennepin Co. 1 st VicePatrick WaletzkoOtter Tail Co. 2 nd ViceRick LarkinCity of St. Paul PastBrenda WodeleWabasha Co. Treas.Kyle BreffleSherburne Co. Sec.Breanna KovalWilkin Co. Judge Ad.Laine SlettaBrown Co. Exec. Dir.Jim Halstrom

5 Emergency Management Handbook for Government Officials A Message From AMEM Purpose: Quick Reference Guide, Ready Resource Intent: Provide a basic overview of emergency management & augment understanding of local emergency operations plans and procedures.

6 Section 1: Comprehensive Emergency Management The preparation for and the carrying out of all emergency functions. * Natural * Technological * Human-Caused Prevent Prepare For Respond To Recover From Mitigate

7 Section 1: Comprehensive Emergency Management Consists of Four Related Components * All Hazards * All Phases * All Impacts * All Stakeholders

8 Section 2: Identified Hazards in the State of Minnesota Flooding Wildfire Windstorms Tornadoes Hail Lightning Costal Erosion Landslide Sinkholes & Land Subsidence Severe Winter Storms Earthquakes Drought Extreme Temperatures Infectious Disease Dam Failure Water Supply Contamination Fire (Structural) Hazardous Materials Nuclear Accidents Infrastructure Failure

9 Section 3: The National Incident Management System Systematic, Proactive Approach All Level of Government, Nongovernmental Organizations, and the Private Sector Regardless of Cause, Size, Location, or Complexity Reduce the Loss of Life, Property, & Harm to the Environment

10 Section 3: The National Incident Management System 5 Major Components Preparedness Communications & Information Management Resource Management Command & Management Ongoing Management and Maintenance

11 Section 4: Incident Command System Standardized, On-Scene, All-Hazards Incident Management Approach Integration of Facilities, Equipment, Personnel, Procedures, and Communications Enables Coordinated Response Among Jurisdictions and Agencies Establishes Common Processes for Planning and Managing Resources

12 Section 4: Incident Command System ICS is used by all levels of government and by many nongovernmental organizations and the private sector. 5 Major Functional Areas Command * Operations * Planning * Logistics * Finance & Administration

13 Section 4: Incident Command System Command Staff – Carry out staff functions needed to support the Incident Commander… * Public Information Officer * Safety Officer * Liaison Officer

14 Section 4: Incident Command System General Staff – Responsible for the functional aspects of the incident command structure… Operations * Planning * Logistics * Finance & Administration

15 Section 4: Incident Command System

16 Section 5: Emergency Operations Center Central location that enables government to: –Coordinate Policy Decisions –Manage Resources –Respond to Disasters/Emergencies …Beyond the Scope of an On-Scene Incident Commander/Command Post

17 Section 5: Emergency Operations Center Overview Facilitate Management of Emergency / Disaster Assist Those Who Need Help Reduce Devastating Consequences Help the Community Get Back to Normal

18 Section 5: Emergency Operations Center Should be located away from vulnerable high-risk areas Should be accessible to local officials A convenient, secure location will:  Provide a single, recognizable focal point  Allow emergency organizations to respond as a team  Permit a faster response & recovery

19 Section 5: Emergency Operations Center Direction & Control Coordination Priority Establishment Resource Management Information Collection & Evaluation

20 Section 5: Emergency Operations Center When To Activate The EOC: Outside resources are needed to accomplish the work begin done on scene. Incident requires multiple agencies to be involved, beyond those that usually work together Incident covers a large geographical area and/or involves multiple locations.

21 Section 5: Emergency Operations Center Don’t Forget These! Assessor Environmental Management Legal Advisor Health Care Facilities Private Partners Information Technology Voluntary Organizations Medical Examiner/Coroner Utility Representatives The needs of the incident will always dictate the level of staffing.

22 Section 6: Emergency Operations Plan Assigns Responsibilities Sets Forth Lines of Authority & Organizational Relationships Describes How People, Animals, and Property Are Protected Identifies Personnel, Equipment, Facilities, Supplies & Other Resources Available Reconciles Requirements with Other Jurisdictions

23 Section 6: Emergency Operations Plan Flexible For Use In All Emergencies Describes: Purpose, Situation & Assumptions Continuity of Operations Organization & Assignment of Responsibility Administration & Logistics Plan Development & Maintenance Authorities & References

24 Section 6: Emergency Operations Plan Format Options  Functional Basic Plan + Functional & Hazard-Specific Annexes  Emergency Support Functions (ESF) Basic Plan + ESF Annexes + Support Annexes  Agency/Department-Focused Basic Plan + Agency Sections + Hazard Procedures

25 Section 7: Potential Response Resources Emergency Services Medical Assembly Areas Transportation Supplies Communications Media Individuals Equipment Service Agencies Community Groups

26 Section 8: EM Director Functions / Responsibilities Minnesota State Statutes Chapter 12 Develops & Maintains EOP Develops & Implements Public Warning Systems Coordinates Jurisdictional Response Assists Governments within the Jurisdiction Develops EOC Procedures & Manages EOC Maintains Equipment Inventory & Use Prepares/Presents Budget Maintains Liaison with Jurisdiction & State Provides Direction for Staff & Volunteer Training Efforts

27 Section 9: Elected Officials Functions & Responsibilities Elected Officials Bear Direct and Ultimate Responsibility for How Well Their Jurisdictions Responds to and Recovers From an Emergency/Disaster. Government Charter: “To Maintain Law and Order and Provide for the Protection of Lives and Property.”

28 Section 9: Elected Officials Functions & Responsibilities Be Familiar with Your Local EOP & Procedures Receive Initial Assessments and Updates Receive Ongoing Status Briefings Be Informed

29 Section 9: Elected Officials Functions & Responsibilities Exercise Leadership & Policy-Making Maintain Personal Logs of Information, Factors, & Decisions Direct Staff to Assess & Report Problems Chair Assessment Meetings Exercise Leadership

30 Section 9: Elected Officials Functions & Responsibilities Develop & Implement Personal and Family Preparedness Plans Tell Family Members of Your Destination & Contact Numbers Take Personal Items Take List of Peers Take Care of Personal Responsibilities

31 Section 9: Elected Officials Functions & Responsibilities Contact Legal Advisors & Establish Communications Review Legal Responsibilities & Authorities Monitor Equity of Service Review Status of Contracts Establish Legal Contacts

32 Section 9: Elected Officials Functions & Responsibilities Recognize Personal Accountability Check Provisions for Other Public Officials Establish & Evaluate Policy Decisions Confer with Other Elected Officials Use Elected Officials to Request Assistance Maintain Political Awareness

33 Section 9: Elected Officials Functions & Responsibilities Check Plans to Inform the Public Ensure Designation of a Single PIO Ensure Establishment of a Media Center Channel All Releases Through the EOC Ensure Establishment of Media Updates Keep the Public Informed

34 Section 10: Continuity of Operations An effort within individual executive departments and agencies to ensure that essential functions continue to be performed during a wide range of emergencies.

35 Section 10: Continuity of Operations Elements of Viable Continuity of Operations Essential Functions Orders of Succession Delegations of Authority Continuity Facilities Continuity Communications Vital Records Management Human Capital Tests, Training, & Exercises Devolution of Control and Direction Reconstitution

36 Section 11: Requesting State Assistance When a jurisdiction is confronted with an emergency/disaster, it is recognized that it will respond with resources under its control and though any mutual aid agreements with surrounding jurisdictions. Certain state and federal agencies, along with private relief agencies are available to provide disaster recovery assistance.

37 Section 11: Requesting State Assistance Minnesota Duty Officer –Ensures proper notification to state & local government agencies. –Source of information, facilitator for resources Minnesota National Guard –Preservation of life and property, & to support civil law enforcement agencies. –Requests must be made by County Sheriff or City of 1 st Class Mayor.

38 Section 11: Requesting State Assistance Minnesota Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (MNVOAD) –Ensures effective and efficient response by voluntary agencies to any disaster situation. –MN Duty Officer activates resources beyond local level

39 Section 11: Requesting State Assistance Additional State Assistance Programs: Tax Relief for Damaged or Destroyed Properties Calamity Act Disaster Assistance for the Repair of State-Aid Roads & Streets Minnesota Housing Finance Agency Statewide Mutual Aid Emergency Management Assistance Compact

40 Section 12: Requesting Federal Assistance When major disasters occur, the federal government serves as a provider of disaster recovery assistance to both public agencies and private citizens. Public Assistance Hazard Mitigation Individual Assistance

41 Section 12: Requesting Federal Assistance Individual Assistance Program Individuals and Households Program Small Business Administration Disaster Loan Program Other Programs: –Food Coupons –Disaster Unemployment Assistance –Legal, Consumer, Insurance, & Tax Advice –Crisis Counseling & Referral –Social Security Assistance

42 Section 12: Requesting Federal Assistance Federal Emergency Declarations: Emergency Declaration Fire Management Assistance Grant Small Business Administration Declaration Agricultural Disaster Declaration

43 Section 13: Emergency Declarations & Powers Minnesota Statutes, Chapter 12 State Declaration of Emergency –Civil Defense Emergency – 30 Days –Peacetime Emergency – 5 Days (Unless Extended) Local Declaration of Emergency –Mayor, Tribal Chairperson, or Chair of County Board –Shall Not be Continued in Excess of 3 Days, Except with the Consent of the Governing Body

44 Section 13: Emergency Declarations & Powers Powers & Duties Under Emergency Declarations Activates the State or Local Emergency Operations Plan Authorizes Aid and Assistance May Require Any Person to Perform Services for Civil Defense Purposes

45 Section 13: Emergency Declarations & Powers Powers & Duties Under Emergency Declarations Commandeer Motor Vehicle, Tools, Appliances or Other Personal Property (w/ Just Compensation) Enter into Contracts/Incur Obligations Necessary Without Compliance with Time- Consuming Procedures and Formalities Prescribed by Law.

46 Section 14: Training & Certification State Training Programs –Emergency Management Professional Certification Program –Training Conferences DHS FEMA Training Programs –National Training and Education Division –Emergency Management Institute –National Domestic Preparedness Consortium

47 Section 15: Tribal Governments Tribal Emergency Response Committee / Commission Unified command structure that Tribal Governments will use to respond to an incident that occurs on Tribal Lands. Tribal supervisory level employees from AdministrationPublic WorksDNREducation Gaming Public SafetyHHSFinance Public HealthPublic Information Officer

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49 Section 15: Tribal Governments Tribal Assistance Coordination Group US Federal Government entities dedicated to cooperation and collaboration to strengthen comprehensive all-hazards emergency management for the 560+ Federally recognized Tribal Nations. The TAC-G is also a Federal Incident Command Team for Tribal Governments

50 Section 15: Tribal Governments Tribal Government EOC Staffing Tribal Emergency Response Committee/Commission (TERC) Members If Requested by TERC: –County Officials –State Tribal Liaison Officials –Federal Tribal Officials

51 Section 16: Additional References Local (City/County/Tribal) Resolution/Ordinance on Emergency Management Local (State/City/County/Tribal) Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) Minnesota Emergency Management Director’s Handbook Minnesota State Statutes, Chapter 12 Minnesota State Statutes 299K, Hazardous Chemical Emergency, Planning and Response

52 QUESTIONS?


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