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STAAR/EOC Transitioning from TAKS…. A Clear Departure from TAKS… The philosophy of the STAAR/EOC assessment system is to test content with a “fewer, deeper,

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Presentation on theme: "STAAR/EOC Transitioning from TAKS…. A Clear Departure from TAKS… The philosophy of the STAAR/EOC assessment system is to test content with a “fewer, deeper,"— Presentation transcript:

1 STAAR/EOC Transitioning from TAKS…

2 A Clear Departure from TAKS… The philosophy of the STAAR/EOC assessment system is to test content with a “fewer, deeper, clearer” focus. – “Fewer” meaning approximately one third of the testable standards deemed “readiness” standards will make up majority of a test. – “Deeper” meaning content will be tested at a more rigorous cognitive level. – “Clearer” meaning there will be a clear distinction between the weighting of “readiness” and “supporting” standards. Assessments will emphasize “readiness” standards more heavily. Clear link to College and Career Readiness as evidenced by performance on Algebra 2 EOC and English III assessments.

3 A Clear Departure from TAKS… Contain a greater number of items that have a higher cognitive complexity. Items will more closely match the cognitive demand of the TEKS. In reading, greater emphasis will be given to critical analysis than literal understanding. In social studies, science and mathematics, process skills will be addressed in context (at least 75% of items) rather than in isolation which will allow for a more authentic assessment of the content areas. In general, there will be more open-ended (griddable) items which will require students to derive an answer without the benefit of answer choices.

4 A Clear Departure from TAKS… Assessments will test “at grade level”. Assessment model distinguishes between readiness and supporting standards. – Readiness-TEKS considered critical for success in the current grade or course and important for preparedness in subsequent grades or courses, or college and career readiness at the higher grade levels. (Big Concepts) – Supporting-TEKS that play a role in preparing students but not a central role. (Narrowly Defined Ideas)

5 A Closer Look at Readiness and Supporting Standards…

6 Released STAAR Items Compared to TAKS…

7 TAKS Items Target a Single Standard… Content Standard 3.1. Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student uses place value to communicate about increasingly large whole numbers in verbal and written form, including money. The student is expected to: (C) determine the value of a collection of coins and bills.

8 3 rd Grade TAKS Item, 3.1C

9 At least 75% of STAAR/EOC items will assess both content and process standards… Content Standard 3.1. Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student uses place value to communicate about increasingly large whole numbers in verbal and written form, including money. The student is expected to: (C) determine the value of a collection of coins and bills. Process Standard Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student applies Grade 3 mathematics to solve problems connected to everyday experiences and activities in and outside of school. The student is expected to: (A) Identify the mathematics in everyday situations.

10 3 rd Grade STAAR Item, 3.1C and 3.14A

11 TAKS Items Target a Single Standard… Content Standard 4.13 Probability and statistics. The student solves problems by collecting, organizing, displaying, and interpreting sets of data. The student is expected to: (B) interpret bar graphs.

12 4 th Grade TAKS Items, 4.13B

13 Content Standard Probability and statistics. The student solves problems by collecting, organizing, displaying, and interpreting sets of data. The student is expected to: (B) interpret bar graphs. Process Standard Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student applies Grade 4 mathematics to solve problems connected to everyday experiences and activities in and outside of school. The student is expected to: (B) solve problems that incorporate understanding the problem, making a plan, carrying out the plan, and evaluating the solution for reasonableness. At least 75% of STAAR/EOC items will assess both content and process standards…

14 4 th Grade STAAR Item, 4.13B and4.14B

15 TAKS Items Target a Single Standard… Content Standard 6.5 Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student uses letters to represent an unknown in an equation. The student is expected to: (A) formulate an equation from a problem situation.

16 6 th Grade TAKS item, 6.5A

17 Content Standard 6.5. Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student uses letters to represent an unknown in an equation. The student is expected to: (A) formulate an equation from a problem situation. Process Standard Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student communicates about Grade 6 mathematics through informal and mathematical language, representations, and models. The student is expected to: (A) communicate mathematical ideas using language, efficient tools, appropriate units, and graphical, numerical, physical, or algebraic mathematical models. At least 75% of STAAR/EOC items will assess both content and process standards…

18 6 th Grade STAAR Item, 6.5A and 6.12A

19 Preparing for STAAR/EOC Changing ADULT behavior…

20 Critical Teacher Skills Needed in order to prepare students for STAAR/EOC Distinguish between the Content and Cognitive expectations of the TEKS. Use the CSCOPE Vertical Alignment Documents (VADs) to define course or grade level curriculum specificity. Reconcile course sequences to local calendar. Use the CSCOPE Instructional Focus Documents (IFDs) to identify and reconcile instructional discrepancies based on curriculum specificity. Use CSCOPE Performance Indicators, Unit Tests and Effective Questioning to plan and drive instruction. Evaluate and calibrate instructional resources to meet the demands of the CSCOPE Instructional Focus Document (IFD).

21 Distinguishing Between Cognitive and Content Expectations Back to 4 th Grade… Probability and statistics. The student solves problems by collecting, organizing, displaying, and interpreting sets of data. The student is expected to: (B) interpret bar graphs. Cognitive Expectations: What are the verbs that the student is responsible for doing? solve, interpret Content Expectation: What is the BIG content idea? bar graphs

22 Using Vertical Alignment Documents to Define Course/Grade Specificity From the 3 rd -5 th Vertical Alignment Document…

23 Using Vertical Alignment Documents to Define Course/Grade Specificity From the 3 rd -5 th Vertical Alignment Document… The TEKS’ Cognitive Expectations are specified on the Vertical Alignment Documents. What are the Changes in the Cognitive Specificity from one grade level to the next?

24 Using Vertical Alignment Documents to Define Course/Grade Specificity From the 3 rd -5 th Vertical Alignment Document… The TEKS’ Content Expectations are given further specificity (bulleted items) on the Vertical Alignment Documents. What are the changes in the Content Specificity from one grade level to the next?

25 Reconciling the Year at a Glance with the Local Calendar The 4 th Grade Math Year at a Glance… The CSCOPE Year at a Glance is designed so that approximately 25 instructional days are needed each six weeks. How many days does the district calendar allow for each six weeks? What days can not be counted as instructional days? What events does the district calendar not show that rob instructional time? How will this affect instructional delivery? How can I make up for lost time?

26 Reconciling the Year at a Glance with the Local Calendar What are some things that rob instructional time? The short/long six weeks Assessment days counted as instructional days – Regular assessments, six weeks tests, etc. – Benchmarking – TAKS/EOC Early release days Teacher leave days Intersession days-only certain students are present Extracurricular events Local celebrations

27 The Year at a Glance Tool can be used to create and format a grade level or course sequence that reconciles to the local calendar.

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29 The local Year at a Glance is formatted based on parameters input for each six weeks. The balance of days is shown for each six weeks, each semester, and for the year so that teachers and administrators can begin the process of reconciling the calendar to the instructional days needed.

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31 Using Instructional Focus Documents to Identify and Reconcile Discrepancies Back to 4 th Grade…Remember our standard about bar graphs? Probability and statistics. The student solves problems by collecting, organizing, displaying, and interpreting sets of data. The student is expected to: (B) interpret bar graphs. An Instructional Focus Document packages TEKS together to form a cohesive unit of related and supporting concepts.

32 Using Instructional Focus Documents to Identify and Reconcile Discrepancies Here is 4.13B as it appears on the Instructional Focus Document Verbs (Cognitive Specificity)

33 Using Instructional Focus Documents to Identify and Reconcile Discrepancies Here is 4.13B as it appears on the Instructional Focus Document Bulleted items (Content Specificity)

34 Using Instructional Focus Documents to Identify and Reconcile Discrepancies Here is 4.13B as it appears on the Instructional Focus Document Remember the released question that assesses 4.13B? Which of the Cognitive Specificities (verbs) are being assessed? Which of the Content Specificities (bulleted items) are being assessed?

35 Using Instructional Focus Documents to Identify and Reconcile Discrepancies Here is 4.13B as it appears on the Instructional Focus Document Remember the released question that assesses 4.13B? What would happen if a teacher failed to include instructional opportunities for one of the bulleted items, such as double bar graphs to show data for two different groups?

36 Using Instructional Focus Documents to Identify and Reconcile Discrepancies Self-reflective practice of examining instruction against both the cognitive and content specificity of the Instructional Focus Documents. What might discrepancies look like? – Missing - Something in the content specificity that is not being addressed for the appropriate length of time or not being addressed at all. – Extraneous - Something that is being taught that is not in either the cognitive or content specificities. – Underdeveloped - Cognitive specificity that is not being addressed at the appropriate level, or cognitive specificity that is not being addressed at all.

37 An example from 8 th Grade Math

38 Using Assessments to Plan and Drive Instruction. Observation – Informal evidence gathered or observed by the teacher to inform instruction, plan interventions, and gauge student competency – Fueled by student/teacher and student/student dialogue, and prompted by facilitation questions Selected Response – Multiple choice, matching, true/false, etc. – Unit Assessments Constructed Response and Artifacts – Evidence of student attainment of learning – Performance Indicators

39 Evaluating and Calibrating Instructional Resources Resources are evaluated to determine if students will be working at the level of complexity described in the both the Cognitive and Content specificities of the TEKS within an bundled unit of instruction. Supplemental resources such as handouts, performance tasks, textbook assignments or other instructional activities can possibly be calibrated to meet cognitive and other content specificities. Resources that do not meet content specificities or can not be calibrated must be discarded.

40 Wrapping it up… Preparing students for STAAR/EOC requires… Teachers to understand critical structures regarding the TEKS. Teachers to know and “drive their lane” of traffic. Teachers to reconcile course sequences with the time allocated by the district calendar. Teachers to discover and remedy instructional discrepancies. Teachers to use assessment to not only evaluate students but also drive instruction. Teachers to critically evaluate all instructional materials and calibrate them as necessary. Teachers to become curriculum experts.


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