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MAFS FSA Mathematics Florida Standards and the

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1 MAFS FSA Mathematics Florida Standards and the
Florida Standards Assessment Updates ….. as of December 2014 Iris Harrell

2 GOALS FOR TODAY… Discuss the most current information about the Florida Standards Assessments (FSA) for Mathematics. Show examples and expectations of the item types that will be on the CBT for FSA. Share teacher online resources to assist with student instruction and teacher implementation of the MAFS.

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5 Dates April - May 2015 Revised 11/24/14

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7 End-of-Course FSA Assessments
All sessions are administered over two days. The EOCs are 2 sessions, one for each day of testing. Each session will be a minimum of 90 minutes; however, students who are not finished at 90 min. MAY TAKE UP TO ½ of their regular school day to complete each session. The start and stop times will be provided by the individual school assessment coordinator. Each session will have a similar number of items. For 2 sessions, there will most likely be per session. NOTES: There are multiple forms of the assessment, with a maximum of 68 items on each test form. Approx items on all of the tests listed above are experimental (field test) items and are included in the ranges, but are not included in a student’s score.

8 The FSA Test Item Specifications help to guide the development of scenarios and items BUT DO NOT tell what to teach Item Specifications ARE NOT course descriptions. Draft specifications for grades 3-8, Alg. 1 and 2, and Geometry are all posted on the FSA portal at Algebra 1 EOC Geometry EOC Algebra 2 EOC Link to FSAssessments.org to show access to the Test Item Specifications, Test Design Summary and Blueprint for % of Points by DOK. Test item specifications define the content and format of the assessment and test items for each grade level and subject. Updated Item Specifications are expected sometime in January 2015.

9 Item Specifications Definitions
Also assesses refers to standard(s) closely related to the primary standard statement. Clarification statements explain what students are expected to do when responding to the question. Assessment limits define the range of content knowledge and degree of difficulty that should be assessed in the assessment items for the standard. Acceptable response mechanisms describe the characteristics from which a student must answer a question. Context defines types of stimulus materials that can be used in the assessment items. Item Specifications Definitions

10 EOC Calculator Policy Link here for DRAFT document for “Calculator and Reference Sheet Policies”. Pg. 1 lists the functions that students WILL need on FSA. Pg. 2 lists the PROHIBITED functionalities. All STUDENTS taking an FSA Mathematics Assessment (Grades 7 and 8, Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra 2) will have access to the online calculator during the associated session(s) of their FSA, but students will also be permitted the use of an approved handheld scientific calculator. It is a school district’s decision whether or not to purchase hand-held scientific calculators for students. No items in the current FSA EOC assessments require the graphing tool in order to solve them. Therefore, a scientific calculator is sufficient for all items. Not every test item in the calculator section will require the use of a calculator A handheld four-function calculator is NOT RECOMMENDED as a handheld because it may not be sufficient for all assessment items. Students will have access to the online scientific calculator during the appropriate session 2 of the FSA EOCs. ALL students are allowed and MAY REQUEST to use a handheld scientific calculator whose functionalities have been approved by the state. School districts will individually determine their own policies for purchasing/providing handheld calculators to students The state will NOT approve specific MODELS of calculators.

11 Calculator Designations As Noted in the Test Item Specifications
YES – a calculator will be available for items written to a standard. NO – a calculator will NOT be available for items written to a standard. NEUTRAL – assessment items in standards that are labeled as “neutral” are reviewed by a committee of educators to determine if the item requires the use of a calculator. If the educators feel the item DOES NOT require the use of calculator, the item MAY BE PLACED on EITHER Session.

12 Hyperlink (behind the Date shown, bottom left) to DRAFT Calculator and Reference Sheet Policies for FSA Mathematics. This clip is from pg. 2 of document. Hyperlink to DRAFT document.

13 There will be no conversions between systems.

14 Formulas Presented NOTE: The full intent of the standard(s) and the notations.
Grade Levels and HS courses will be given (either embedded in the item directions or in a pop-up window reference) the formula(s) that are noted in the individual boxes on this chart. Therefore, students MUST HAVE PRIOR KNOWLEDGE AND MASTERY OF the use of formulas that are prerequisite skills to their current grade/course. KNOWING the formulas means to have an understanding of WHY the formula works and HOW the formula relates to the measure (area, volume, circumference) AND the figure. Be clear on the wording of the standards and know that “full intent” (ie. assesses the conceptual understanding that is expected of students OR assesses their understanding basically of how to “use”/”solve problems” with knowledge)

15 Hyperlinked (access behind the graphic on slide) “DRAFT Calculator and Reference Sheet Policies for FSA” document. This table is on pg. 3 of the DRAFT policies document.

16 See pgs. 11-12 for description of each TEI.
Link to document above. See pgs for description of each TEI. Hyperlink to the updated document (behind the graphic) to see all grade levels’ FSA design summary with reporting domains with standards and percentages. Hyperlinked document also has descriptions of each technology-enhanced item (TEI). NOTE: Some teachers may notice that a few of the FSA TEI types have had the “name” edited from what earlier material from the state referred to them as.

17 FSA Training Tests and Resources
Take the FSA EOC Training Test User Guide to the FSA Training Test Answer Key FSA EOC Mathematics Students are required to participate in a training test session at their school prior to testing. The Training tests are intended to be used for students and teachers to get an idea of the functionalities of the CBT. The tests are currently by grade bands, but there will be new training tests with new sample items next fall (2015) and these will be by individual grade level and HS course. • Training tests will allow students to become familiar with the system and item types that will be encountered on the FSA. These tests should NOT be used for PREDICTABILITY as to the level of difficulty of assessment items. The “User Quick Guide” will have an overview of the training test features with general test tools and explains the keyboard navigation.

18 Conversions AND formulas given.
Geometry Conversions AND formulas given. No formulas given on reference sheet. Algebra II Conversions AND formulas given Sample clip from the EOC Training Test from the Florida Standards’ portal. This slide shows how to access the REFERENCE SHEET (upper right hand corner) for formula(s) and conversions. The reference sheet will be a pop-up window that students will be able to access. Algebra I has ONLY conversions because the formula will be given within the item(s), if needed on the FSA. Geometry and Algebra II will have a reference sheet that has conversions AND formulas given.

19 Multiple-Choice Items Multi-Select Items
Require the student to select a single answer option. Multiple-choice items consist of: a context (mathematical or real-world) a question a single correct answer three plausible distractors Multi-Select Items Allow the student to select more than one answer option. These are different from multiple-choice items. Some items may ask the student to select a specific number of responses, while other items may ask the student to select ALL correct responses. Multi-select items consist of: A context (mathematical or real-world) A question Two or more correct answers Several plausible distractors Multi-Select Items are worth one point. Multi-Select Items DO NOT have partial credit. A student MUST SELECT ALL CORRECT ANSWERS to receive credit for the item. Multiple-Choice and Multi-Select items will make up approx. 50% of the FSA. Students need various and frequent opportunities to experience thinking that encourages them to look at “other correct representations” of answer solutions. These types of items can even be created by students, discussed aloud among peers and in whole-group setting with reasoning and justification being given for plausible and implausible answer choices. Items can be added to class assessments for independent student practice. Smarter Balanced, PARC, and others have some practice material that give ideas for multi-select and are correlated to Common Core Standards.

20 Think about ways that you can have the students in your classroom write correct AND incorrect ways to represent “a given”. This may help them to practice for Multi-select items, plus give them opportunities to increase their depth of understanding.

21 Equation Response/Equation Editor Items
Equation items require the student to enter a valid statement that answers the question. The response MAY BE a number, an expression, or an equation. Equation Response Items consist of: a context (mathematical or real-world) a question a response area Equivalent fractions and decimals WILL BE ACCEPTED except in items that are assessing a standard where a certain form is the expectation of the standard. A zero in the ones place for answers that fall between and 1 (excluding 0 itself) is NOT required. Students can type in an answer using a mixed number OR a fraction greater than one.

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23 Graphic Response Item Display (GRID) Formerly referred to as: “Grid Items with Action Buttons”
Grid items consist of: a context (mathematical or real-world) a question a response area Grid items require the student to use the point, line, and/or arrow buttons to create a response on a grid.

24 Hot Text Items Hot text items consist of:
Hot text items require the student to either click on a response option or drag a response option to another location. Hot text items consist of: a context (mathematical or real-world) a question a response area This example is an ELA item.

25 Open-Response Items Formerly identified as Natural Language
Open-response items require the student to use the keyboard to enter a response into a text field. Different types of open-response items MAY appear on the test. Open-Response items consist of: a context (mathematical or real-world) a question a response area There should not be major concern for the need for complete sentences or grammatical errors. The expectation is NOT for an equation to be typed into the response area. (That would be the type of answer expected on an “equation-response item”.) This is where the student would enter WORDS/TEXT to answer.

26 New Item Types Matching Items Table Items
Matching items require the student to CHECK A BOX to indicate if information from a column header matches information from a row. Matching items consist of: a context (mathematical or real-world) a question a response area Table items require the student to type NUMERIC VALUES into a given table. The student may complete the entire table or portions of the table, depending on the question that is asked. Table items consist of: a context (mathematical or real-world) a question a response area

27 Editing Task / Editing Choice Items New item types
Editing task items require the student to CLICK on a highlighted word or phrase and ENTER a replacement word or phrase OR CLICK on a highlighted word or phrase and SELECT a replacement FROM A MENU. Editing Task items consist of: a context (mathematical or real-world) a question a response area There is a possibility that these types of items can be used for geometric proofs.

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29 Items COULD COMBINE more than one item type.
Equation Response Item Grid Item with Action Buttons This would be an example of a 2 point item.

30 FSA Scoring and Reporting
FSA Scoring and Reporting The documents listed contain important information for school leaders and teachers to review. Teachers will have “fact sheet” handout about the EOCs for math. (Hyperlink behind graphic to access document for review of different information explained.)

31 www.flstandards.org Teacher Resources
Hyperlinks to documents for MAFS for 9-12 and Calculus are behind graphic. Access MAFS for each grade and HS standards at Click to access “Resources” then “Teachers”. Scroll down to see the MAFS. Download the standards to save and/or print a hard copy, if needed. Hyperlinks on slide to Grades 9-12 and Calculus – MAFS.

32 http://www. flstandards
Page 1 of MAFS Grades 9-12 document.

33 Page 9 of MAFS Grades 9-12 document.

34 http://www. flstandards

35 Items between 2 sessions
Content Complexity of MAFS What are the cognitive demands that can be inferred from the language of the standard? Each session of EOC would have approx. 23 items at a DOK Level 2 Discuss the Depth of Knowledge (DOK) % which in the standards is noted as “Content Complexity”. Content complexity relates specifically to the cognitive demands that can be inferred from the language of the standard. Florida has adopted Webb’s four-level DOK model of content complexity as a means of classifying the cognitive demand presented by standards and curriculum. DOK is a language system for describing the content complexity inherent to standards, tasks, or assessment items. The DOK hierarchy is based on two main factors: 1) sophistication and complexity, and 2) the likelihood that students at the grade level tested would have received prior instruction or would have had an opportunity to learn the content. Some problems or tasks have a low DOK level because the knowledge required is commonly known and students with instruction at grade level should have had the opportunity to learn how to routinely perform what is being asked. It is vital for student success that mathematics teachers expose their students to activities that represent all DOK levels. TOTAL Items between 2 sessions

36 Content Complexity Overview
Content complexity relates to the cognitive demands inferred from the language of a content standard. Content complexity considers factors such as: prior knowledge, processing of concepts and skills, structure/sophistication, number of parts, and application of content structure required to meet an expectation or to attain an outcome. Reference the material from Cpalms on the “Levels of DOK for Mathematics” and Level 1 thru 4 Activities handout. This links to Cpalms for the content complexity level descriptions. Math begins on pg. 9 of the document. Florida has adopted Webb’s four-level DOK model of content complexity as a means of classifying the cognitive demand presented by standards and curriculum. DOK is a language system for describing the content complexity inherent to standards, tasks, or assessment items. Content complexity relates specifically to the cognitive demands that can be inferred from the language of a content standard. Content complexity considers factors such as : prior knowledge, (which does bear some relation to grade level) processing of concepts and skills, sophistication, number of parts, and application of content structure required to meet an expectation or to attain an outcome.

37 Depth of Knowledge Originally created by Norman Webb (1997), can best be described as a tool used to measure and align the cognitive demand of instructional objectives and standardized assessment items Webb first introduced it for the purpose of aligning assessment to standards in the area of cognitive rigor. Levels of DOK represent a hierarchy based on cognitive complexity (rather than time on task difficulty). This hierarchy is based on two main factors: 1) sophistication and complexity, and 2) the likelihood that students at the grade level tested would have received prior instruction or would have had an opportunity to learn the content. Information has been cited from the Article: Depth of Knowledge: An Effective Tool for Educating Students By Elizabeth Marconi, Chelli Smith, and Doug Lombardi Article is Hyperlinked behind the graphic (chart). Some problems or tasks have a low DOK level because the knowledge required is commonly known and students with instruction at grade level should have had the opportunity to learn how to routinely perform what is being asked. Keep in Mind... DOK is a tool to promote student achievement DOK is a scale of cognitive demand DOK level is determined by the item/standard, not the students’ ability DOK is determined by the context, not the specific verb being used It is vital for student success that mathematics teachers expose their students to activities that represent all DOK levels.

38 DOK Level Comparison Shop Talk Article : Hyperlinked behind the graphic (chart). DOK levels are cumulative. For example, a DOK level 3 activity will probably contain DOK level 1 and 2 elements; however, DOK levels are NOT additive. You cannot create a DOK level 2 activity with only DOK level 1 elements (i.e., a DOK level 1 + DOK level 1 does not equal a DOK level 2).

39 DOK 1 DOK 2 DOK 3 DOK Level 4 –” Extended Thinking & Complex Reasoning” Requires extended higher-order processing. Focus is on complex reasoning, planning, and thinking over extended periods of time. Information was cited from the hyperlinked article entitled “Shop Talk” issued by Nevada’s Regional Professional Development Program Answers to the sample problem types on DOK level are found on pg. 20 of the article. DOK 1 DOK 2 DOK 3 INCREASING THE RIGOR… When planning instruction, think carefully about the lower-level recall (DOK 1) that students need to be able to understand and do in moving toward mastery of the full intent of the standards, so that then there can be a “scaffolding” in the instructional activities and discussions for students to have access to move to application of math knowledge (DOK 2), requiring a student to explain and justify and make connections in math (DOK3), and ultimately transfer the knowledege of the math so that they can extend their thinking over time (DOK 4).

40 FSA Practice Materials? SUGGESTIONS ONLY
High School has 29 practice items. Items are noted with the conceptual category, DOK level, and code for Common Core standard. Rubric for scoring would NOT represent the FSA. Practice Test Student Booklets and Answer Keys (Not to be printed or distributed) can be used as a reference for teachers in order to discuss with students, especially the items that are representing “multi-select” types. Algebra I Geometry Algebra II Smarter Balanced - Practice assessment items and performance task-like items can be found. Some items would be for Computer Based; however, the information presented could be helpful for teachers in creating practice material for their students. There are many “multi-select” type items for use in class discussions/assessments in the classroom. PARCC - This website displays sample test items and practice test items for use by educators, parents, authors, the public, textbook publishers, and others to help raise awareness of the PARCC assessments and to help prepare educators and students. No charge is imposed for the use of the items that are identified as samples. The widespread use and sharing of these materials is encouraged, provided that the source of the materials is acknowledged in any reproduction of the samples. Alg. I KEY Geometry KEY Algebra II KEY NOTE: This information is NOT necessarily representative of the FSA. The documents can give teachers ideas about offering students various experiences with conceptual learning in order to develop depth of content knowledge.

41 Learning Progression Documents
In Grade 6, students build on the knowledge and experiences in data analysis developed in earlier grades. In Grade 7, students move from concentrating on analysis of data to production of data, understanding that good answers to statistical questions depend upon a good plan for collecting data relevant to the questions of interest. Until Grade 8, almost all of students’ statistical topics and investigations have dealt with univariate data, e.g., collections of counts or measurements of one characteristic. Eighth graders apply their experience with the coordinate plane and linear functions in the study of association between two variables related to a question of interest. Students build on knowledge and experience described in the 6-8 Statistics and Probability Progression. Students develop a more formal and precise understanding of statistical inference, which requires a deeper understanding of probability. Because of its strong connection with modeling, the domain of Statistics and Probability is starred, indicating that all of its standards are modeling standards. Documents are hyperlinked behind graphics. Overview from the K-5 Categorical and Measurement Data Learning Progression Document… As students work with data in Grades K–5, they build foundations for their study of statistics and probability in Grades 6 and beyond, and they strengthen and apply what they are learning in arithmetic. These documents can serve as a reference tool for teachers in their building their own knowledge of the learning progressions of students with regard to statistics. The K–5 data standards run along two paths within the Measurement and Data Domain. One path deals with categorical data and focuses on bar graphs as a way to represent and analyze such data. Categorical data comes from sorting objects into categories. Students’ work with categorical data in early grades will support their later work with bivariate categorical data and two-way tables in eighth grade. The other path deals with measurement data. In high school, students build on their experience from the middle grades with data exploration and summarization, randomization as the basis of statistical inference, and simulation as a tool to understand statistical methods. Learning Progression Documents

42 Take a look at Tiffany’s lesson…
After learning to write the equation of an ellipse, students design an elliptical pool table that would guarantee that even the worst player can always make a shot. Hyperlinks available within slide… Free registration and access to all units that are Common Core aligned. There are over 10,000 complete Common Core-aligned lessons K-12 math and ELA available. The Master Teacher Project (MTP) is a revolutionary effort to highlight and share the best teaching practices around the Common Core. The project brings together 130+ Master Teachers in grades K-12 math and ELA to provide accessible and classroom-ready lessons that are free. “The MTP has the potential to drastically improve math instruction for students across the country by unifying great teachers and resources.”

43 Develop Common Assessments and Submit to Algebra Nation
Mini Assessment – after a section video Summative Assessment– after a unit These can be available for ALL TEACHERS in the Teacher Area https://clever.com/in/santarosa In 2012 the Univ. of Florida’s College of Education and Study Edge (a tutoring company) worked together, with support from the Bill and Linda Gates Foundation, to release “Algebra Nation”. Algebra Nation is an online platform designed to support Florida’s students to be successful in Algebra I and on the EOC. Santa Rosa County has just this year become integrated to access videos and resources in the Algebra classrooms. Algebra I Teachers should pre-order the MAFS (grey) workbooks for their students now so that your students will have them to support viewing the MAFS videos during the second semester of school. Algebra Nation will be printing the workbooks soon and they will be shipped directly to the teacher at NO COST. Teachers MUST ORDER INDIVIDUALLY. A school CANNOT order for all of their Algebra I teachers.

44 STRATEGIC EDUCATION RESEARCH PARTNERSHIP
Research-designed 42 specific algebra concepts Tested in over 300 classrooms with ,000 students. Results with students who typically struggled with algebra showed significant increase in conceptual understanding of concepts. Helps Students: identify, discuss, and reduce misconceptions gain deeper conceptual understanding strengthen procedural skills Provides Teachers: insight into students’ thinking launch-point for mathematically-rich discussions with students opportunities to address misconceptions and repeated errors Explaining Solving Analyzing SERP (Strategic Education Research Partnership) was founded in 2003 to bridge the worlds of education research, practice, and design. There were 8 School Districts in the partnership. Public products are made available to all districts. AlgebraByExample are Example-Based Problem Sets that can be downloaded and then used on LCD projection or printed. The problems can also be purchased. Target students’ misconceptions Effectively remediate repeated errors Support the standards for mathematical practice (SMP) Promote students’ spontaneous mathematical discussions Helps students development of conceptual understanding of content Strengthens procedural skills CHECK OUT THE SHORT VIDEO CLIPS under “The R&D” (research) TAB once you link to the website. Worth viewing to hear about the research studies! These problem sets are specific to Algebra; however, the concept of how students take items that are INCORRECTLY and CORRECTLY solved, and then asking them to explain what happened, as well as giving them practice to try out similar items, CAN BE HELPFUL TO ALL GRADES! I think that this strategy and experience could help to prepare students for the MULTI-SELECT item types on FSA. STRATEGIC EDUCATION RESEARCH PARTNERSHIP

45 Great resources hyperlinked within the grade-level/course curriculum map documents that are found on Okaloosa County’s math page. The Math Dude is an award-winning instructional video series produced by the Montgomery County Public School (MCPS TV) in Maryland. Mike DeGraba’s fast-paced programs help middle and high school students improve their Algebra Skills. Okaloosa County’s Algebra 1 Curriculum Guide has units of instruction paced according to the video sequencing of The Math Dude’s videos. All videos have the capability to be downloaded.

46 2014-2015 Mathematics Scope and Sequence and Curriculum Blueprints
Outlines student expectations that are aligned to MAFS. Provides a frame for common teacher learning. The Blueprints are meant to be used as a starting point for collaborative unit planning. There are numerous hyperlinks (resources) within these blueprints. Units reference the use of EngageNY Modules Common Core “Flipbooks” Intended to help teachers understand the depth of the math content standards and their connections to the SMP. The “flipbooks” have instructional strategies, explanation of possible misconceptions, and examples that are specific to the standards and grade level. Lake County has so many great hyperlinked resources within the blueprints. The “Flipbooks” are a terrific resource for teachers! You can download and have it on your computer desktop, save to your U-drive, or print a hardcopy to have available at all times to use for reference. Highly recommended for teacher-learning of content and practice standards.

47 Any questions that I might can help with?
Thank you for your time today!


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