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The Hispanic/Latino Community: Partnering to Combat Domestic Violence 2005 Many Voices One Vision Conference Convention Center Indianapolis, Indiana August.

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Presentation on theme: "The Hispanic/Latino Community: Partnering to Combat Domestic Violence 2005 Many Voices One Vision Conference Convention Center Indianapolis, Indiana August."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Hispanic/Latino Community: Partnering to Combat Domestic Violence 2005 Many Voices One Vision Conference Convention Center Indianapolis, Indiana August 2, 2005 The Indiana Prevention Resource Center at Indiana University is funded in part by a contract with the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration, Division of Mental Health and Addiction. Barbara Seitz de Martinez -- Indiana Prevention Resource Center Gloria Belange King -- Hispanic Health Project, Wishard Hospital Kimber Nicoletti -- CARe Initiative Denise Rodriguez -- Center of Hope, Wishard Hospital

2 Organization of Presentation -- The Community: Background and Statistics -- Risk Factors: Vulnerabilities and Cultural Characteristics -- Solutions: Introducing the Latino Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Thanks to the Center for Substance Abuse’s Hispanic Initiative for the black and white photos used throughout this presentation.

3 Part I: The Community Background & Statistical Indiana’s Hispanic/Latino Population

4 Latino vs. Non-L Population Growth The United States Hispanic Leadership Institute, The Almanac of Latino Politics 2002 & 2004 (Chicago, 2002): 1. Source 2000 Census Pop ↑Non H/LH/L US32.7m13%58% US Cities4.7m0.9m3.8m IN GrowthPop ↑Non H/LH/L ,3267.7% 117 % ,3743.9%43% ,5132%20% U.S. Census SF3 and AGS 2004 est. (2005)

5 Indiana’s Hispanics/Latinos, 2000 RED=Most, Greens, Dark (More)  Light (Least) Total Population: 2000: 214,536

6 Top 10 Counties, Hispanic/Latino Population (No.) Percent of Total Population: 4.1 % Indiana’s Hispanics/Latinos, 2003

7 Indiana’s Hispanics/Latinos, 2004 AGS 2004 (2005) Count Total Population: 2002: 236, : 255,755

8 Indiana’s Hispanics/Latinos, 2009 Percent Total Population: 2002: 236, : 255, : 307,290

9 Hispanic/Latino Pop Growth Indiana Growth 20% Total Population: 2002: 236, : 255, : 307,290

10 Indiana’s Hispanics/Latinos U.S. Census Bureau; AGS, Core Demographics, 2000 (2001); 2004 est. (2005) Year est projection Hispanic/Latino Origin 98,794214,536255,775307,290 As Percent of Population 3.5%4%4.1%5%

11 Top 10 Counties, Hispanic/Latino Population (No.) Total Population: 253,697 Indiana’s Hispanics/Latinos, 2003 CountyPop 2002Pop 2003 Lake64,26264,0291 Marion36,70541,3262 Elkhart18,17421,0653 Allen15,35916,6924 St. Joe13,82614,9375 Tippecanoe8,7189,8876 Porter7,8678,2297 Kosciusko4,1344,5288 Noble3,7074,2409 Hamilton4,08510

12 Top 10 Counties, Hispanic/Latino Population (%) % of Total Pop: 4.1% Indiana’s Hispanics/Latinos, 2003 CountyPercent 2002Percent 2003 Lake Elkhart Clinton Cass Noble Marshall White Tippecanoe Kosciusko St. Joe5.25.6

13 IN’s Cities w/ Most Latinos, 2003 #CityH/L 1Indy38,0734.9% 2Hammond18, % 3E. Chicago17, % 4Ft Wayne14,1916.8% 5S. Bend9,19910% 6Elkhart7, % 7Goshen6, % 8Lafayette6,4469.1% 9Gary5,0654.9% 10Portage3,3309.9% AGS, Core Demographics, 2003 est. (2004) IN Places 6.4%

14 IN’s Cities w/ Most Latinos, 2003 %CityH/L 1E. Chicago17, Ligonier1,89643% 3Cromwell Whiting1, % 5Goshen6, % 6Hammond18, % 7 Lake Station City 3, % 8Monon % 9Plymouth1, % 10Elkhart9, % AGS, Core Demographics, 2003 est. (2004) IN Places 6.4%

15 Indianapolis Hispanic/Latino Population Growth th highest city (299% growth to 2000) from 1% to 4.1% of population The United States Hispanic Leadership Institute, The Almanac of Latino Politics 2002 & 2004 (Chicago, 2002): 7.

16 Recent Immigration Est million foreign born Latinos in 2000 Up from 1.8 m in 1970 Average immigration of 500,000 persons each year Over half (51%) of U.S. foreign born population was born in Latin America in 2000 Up from 9% in 1960 The United States Hispanic Leadership Institute, The Almanac of Latino Politics 2002 & 2004 (Chicago, 2002): 13.

17 Hispanic/Latino Diversity Racial Cultural Religious Linguistic Socioeconomic

18 Hispanic/Latinos: Why are there so many different terms? Puerto Ricanos Borriqua Mexicans Mexican-Americans South Americans Hispanoparlantes Hispanic Central Americans

19 A Peek at Culture come from 20 plus According to 2002 Census, One in Eight people in the U.S is of Hispanic origin. Spanish is the second most common language in the United States. 53% Latino Youth graduate high school. 77% of Latinos in the U.S. are Catholic.

20 A Peek into Culture Personalismo Familismo Collectivismo Traditional Gender Roles

21 Barriers The National Violence Against Women Survey found that women were less likely to report rape victimization than non- women.

22 Cultural Values Taboos around sexuality Gender role issues Importance of family/community

23 Language Barriers Women in general and even bilingual youth may still have preference for first language when dealing with sensitive topics.

24 Dialect Acculturation Attitude Awareness

25 Distrust of the system/police Lack of Service/culturally appropriate services Lack of sensitivity training for police

26 Hispanic/Latino Characteristics H/LNon-H/L Less than HS37.9%9.5% Health Ins <65 66% 87% Reg. Health C Provider 68.5%84.1% Age % 12.1% AGS Indiana, 2003: Core Demographic IN Places 6.4%

27 Risk Factors (DV and SA) Mobility (Recent Immigration and Migration) Cultural Values and Acculturation Distrust of the system/police Lack of Support System Poverty High Risk Jobs No Health Insurance Depression Language Barrier - Awareness Educational Background - Awareness

28 Risk Factor: Mobility Statistics –Recent Immigration Marion Co: 50% here 0-2 years (2000) Marion Co: 88% foreign born –Migration (migrant farmers, etc.) Effects –Stress, lack of support group,

29 Risk Factor: Isolation Stats –Recent Immigration –Mobility in general Effects Stress Lack of Support System Difficulty knowing about and accessing resources

30 Risk Factor: Poverty Statistics –56% in unskilled jobs (working poor) –Per capita income less than for Non-H W or Afr-Am –Rate for H/Latinos 3x higher than for non-Hisp (e.g., 8% for Whites; 22.8% for Hispanics) Effects –Stress –Crowding (> 1/3 in “shared housing”) –90% rent

31 Risk Factor: High Risk Jobs Statistics –Deaths on the job about 20% higher than for Non-Hispanics (BLS) Effects –Stress –Health costs –Lack of Income

32 Risk Factor: No Health Insurance Statistics –34% of total Hispanic/Latino population –29% of all Hispanic/Latino children –30% of all poor Hispanic/Latino children Effects –Reluctance to seek medical assistance –Poor health status, stress

33 Insurance Barriers to Health In U.S., 16% (~43 million) lack health insurance Source: Census No Health Insurance LatinosBlacksNon-Hispanic Whites Total Population 34%22%12% All Children 29%19%11% Poor Children 30%21%

34 Health Disparities AIDS (Men>3x, Women>5x more likely) Diabetes (IL, yrs, 15.9% vs 4.6%) Self-rated poor health (28.9% vs 14%)

35 Risk Factor: Depression Statistics –Depression from isolation, poverty, stress Effects –General negative health impact –Irritability, substance abuse

36 Risk Factor: Language Barrier Statistics –Marion Co: 88% foreign born –Marion Co: 50% 0-2 years here –Marion Co: 1 st generation residents Effects –Reluctance to see health care –Barriers to quality health care, lack of translators

37 Risk Factor: Low Literacy Statistics –Marion Co: 60% have less than HS education Effects –Difficulty accessing resources –Economic difficulty

38 Educational Barriers to Health Care Education, Ages 25+ LatinosBlacksAsian/ Pacific Is. Non-Lat. Whites H.S. Diploma 57%79%86%88% B.A. Degree 11%17%44%28% Census 2000.

39 Barriers to Health Care Insurance Language Status - Fear Mobility Economic Policy - Fear Health Care System Acculturation Education

40 Impacts of DV on Children Shame Fear and Anxiety Traumatic Reactions Alliance w/ Batterer Parentification Aggression Rage Depression Runaways Delinquency Dating Violence O’Keefe, Maura and Shirley Lebovics, “Adolescents from Maritally Violent Homes,” Prevention Researcher 12/1 (Feb. 2005):3-7.

41 Need Help? Source: Domestic Violence Network of Greater Indianapolis,

42 Need Help? Source: National Coalition Against Domestic Violence,

43 Need Help? Source: Domestic Violence Network of Greater Indianapolis,

44 Need Help? Source: Domestic Violence Network of Greater Indianapolis,

45 Statistics : DV Nationally: 25% of women sexually assaulted Marion County: –100,000+ at some pt in life –3,000 sought protective order –5,500 reports of domestic violence to LE Nationally: 3+ killed daily Indiana: 64 deaths by DV in 12 mos. Source: Domestic Violence Network of Greater Indianapolis,

46 Statistics : Domestic Homicide Nationally: 3+ killed daily Indiana: 64 deaths by DV in 12 mos. Source: Domestic Violence Network of Greater Indianapolis,

47 Statistics : Violence and Youth Nationally: 1 in 5 females in HS Marion Co: perhaps > 10,000, 15-24, in 1 yr. Source: Domestic Violence Network of Greater Indianapolis,

48 Introducing

49 LC: Homepage

50 LC: History

51 Board

52 Board, cont.

53 LC: Contact Us

54 Resources

55 Welcome to CARe

56 CARE – Who is CARE?

57 Wishard – Hispanic Health Project

58 Domestic Violence Network

59

60

61 Incasa.org

62 Incasa – Purpose, Mission

63 National Coalition Against DV

64 Voices of Courage

65

66

67 National Latino Council on ATP-- LCAT

68 Hispanichealth.org

69

70 La AntiDroga


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