Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Chapter 8: Assessing Behavior Lindsey Gallagher Caldwell College June 6, 2012.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Chapter 8: Assessing Behavior Lindsey Gallagher Caldwell College June 6, 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 8: Assessing Behavior Lindsey Gallagher Caldwell College June 6, 2012

2 The bedrock principle of behavior analysis is that it is necessary to “____________________” before any treatment is contemplated. (Bailey & Burch, 2011)

3 Baseline “Behavior analyst do not work on rumor or hearsay. They want to see problems for themselves.” Variability Trending ABC’s (function) (Bailey & Burch, 2011)

4 Baseline What does “taking a baseline” mean? Referral has been made of a behavior that is problematic Behavior is observable & has been operationally defined; allows quantification. (frequency, duration etc.) A trained observer has documented the occurrence of the behavior and the circumstances surrounding its occurrence. Legitimacy of referral Problem is measurable If treatment is appropriate depending on graphed baseline data. (Bailey & Burch, 2011)

5 Referral of Problem Bx “This kid is driving me nuts!” Assessment of behavior must occur first! Duration vs. frequency of out of seat behavior? Most appropriate dimension S D for behavior Antecedents (type of assignments, time of day, presence of certain students/subjects) Prompts for Bx Reinforcements currently maintaining behavior From this assessment/observation the legitimacy of referral is established and possible operating variables are identified. (Bailey & Burch, 2011)

6 Baseline (Bailey & Burch, 2011)

7 Big Bang Theory Sheldon observes Raj on drugs (Bailey & Burch, 2011)

8 3.0 Assessing Behavior Behavior analysts who use behavioral assessment techniques do so for purposes that are appropriate in light of research. Behavior analysts recommend seeking medical consultation if there is any reasonable possibility that a referred behavior is a result of a medication side effect or some biological cause. (Bailey & Burch, 2011)

9 3.0A Assessing Behavior (a)Behavior analysts' assessments, recommendations, reports, and evaluative statements are based on information and techniques sufficient to provide appropriate substantiation for their findings. Understand your assessment tool Standardization sample & your client Interpret data using test manual and research (Bailey & Burch, 2011)

10 3.0B Assessing Behavior (b) Behavior analysts refrain from misuse of assessment techniques, interventions, results, and interpretations and take reasonable steps to prevent others from misusing the information these techniques provide. Don’t go beyond your data! Discourage others from doing so as well. (Bailey & Burch, 2011)

11

12

13 3.0C Assessing Behavior (c) Behavior analysts recognize limits to the certainty with which judgments or predictions can be made about individuals. Stay close to the data Acknowledge imperfections of assessment Conduct behavioral assessments before implementing a behavior program. (Bailey & Burch, 2011)

14 3.0D Assessing Behavior (d) Behavior analysts do not promote the use of behavioral assessment techniques by unqualified persons, i.e., those who are unsupervised by experienced professionals and have not demonstrated valid and reliable assessment skills. Trained & experienced individuals should carry out assessments BCaBA should be supervised by BCBA (Bailey & Burch, 2011)

15 3.01 Behavioral Assessment Approval. The behavior analyst must obtain the client’s or client-surrogate’s approval in writing of the behavior assessment procedures before implementing them. As used here, client-surrogate refers to someone legally empowered to make decisions for the person(s) whose behavior the program is intended to change; examples of client-surrogates include parents of minors, guardians, and legally designated representatives 3.02 Functional Assessment. (a) The behavior analyst conducts a functional assessment, as defined below, to provide the necessary data to develop an effective behavior change program. (b) Functional assessment includes a variety of systematic information-gathering activities regarding factors influencing the occurrence of a behavior (e.g., antecedents, consequences, setting events, or motivating operations) including interview, direct observation, and experimental analysis Explaining Assessment Results. Unless the nature of the relationship is clearly explained to the person being assessed in advance and precludes provision of an explanation of results (such as in some organizational consultation, some screenings, and forensic evaluations), behavior analysts ensure that an explanation of the results is provided using language that is reasonably understandable to the person assessed or to another legally authorized person on behalf of the client. Regardless of whether the interpretation is done by the behavior analyst, by assistants, or others, behavior analysts take reasonable steps to ensure that appropriate explanations of results are given Consent-Client Records. The behavior analyst obtains the written consent of the client or client-surrogate before obtaining or disclosing client records from or to other sources, including clinical supervisor Describing Program Objectives. The behavior analyst describes, in writing, the objectives of the behavior change program to the client or client-surrogate (see below) before attempting to implement the program. And to the extent possible, a risk- benefit analysis should be conducted on the procedures to be implemented to reach the objective. (Bailey & Burch, 2011)

16 Behavioral Assessment Approval 3.01 Behavioral Assessment Approval Obtain the client’s or client-surrogate’s approval in writing of the behavior assessment procedures before implementing them. parents of minors guardians legally designated representatives (Bailey & Burch, 2011)

17 Functional Assessment 3.02 Functional Assessment. (a) Conduct functional assessment to provide the necessary data to develop an effective behavior change program. (b) Functional assessment includes a variety of systematic information-gathering activities regarding factors influencing the occurrence of a behavior (e.g., antecedents, consequences, setting events, or motivating operations) including interview, direct observation, and experimental analysis. (Bailey & Burch, 2011)

18 Functions

19 Functional Assessment

20 After conducting a functional assessment the ethical behavior analyst is obligated to clearly explain the results and explain limiting conditions of treatment There can be many functions a single topography of behavior; this is why functional assessments are so important to conduct before developing a behavior intervention with any child. (Bailey & Burch, 2011)

21 Bailey & Burch (2011) “Other complexities might include the occurrence of conditional reinforcers or complex schedules of reinforcement which are operating to maintain the behavior, establishing operations that provide motivation from time to time, or discriminative stimuli and setting events, which also set the occasion for behavior. The ethical behavior analyst must examine all these possibilities and determine which are most salient in arriving at a treatment approach.” (Bailey & Burch, 2011)

22 Explaining Assessment Results 3.03 Explaining Assessment Results. Unless the nature of the relationship is clearly explained to the person being assessed in advance and precludes provision of an explanation of results (such as in some organizational consultation, some screenings, and forensic evaluations), behavior analysts ensure that an explanation of the results is provided using language that is reasonably understandable to the person assessed or to another legally authorized person on behalf of the client. Regardless of whether the interpretation is done by the behavior analyst, by assistants, or others, behavior analysts take reasonable steps to ensure that appropriate explanations of results are given. (Bailey & Burch, 2011)

23 Consent-Client Records 3.04 Consent-Client Records. The behavior analyst obtains the written consent of the client or client-surrogate before obtaining or disclosing client records from or to other sources, including clinical supervisor. (Bailey & Burch, 2011)

24

25 Describing Program Objectives 3.05 Describing Program Objectives. The behavior analyst describes, in writing, the objectives of the behavior change program to the client or client- surrogate (see below) before attempting to implement the program. And to the extent possible, a risk-benefit analysis should be conducted on the procedures to be implemented to reach the objective. (Bailey & Burch, 2011)

26 Describing Data Baseline Functional Assessment Reinforcer Assessment Data collection Results of Intervention (Bailey & Burch, 2011)

27 Limiting Conditions 4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior Change Program. The behavior analyst (a) designs programs that are based on behavior analytic principles, including assessments of effects of other intervention methods, (b) involves the client or the client-surrogate in the planning of such programs, (c) obtains the consent of the client, and (d) respects the right of the client to terminate services at any time Describing Conditions for Program Success. The behavior analyst describes to the client or client-surrogate the environmental conditions that are necessary for the program to be effective Environmental Conditions that Preclude Implementation. If environmental conditions preclude implementation of a behavior analytic program, the behavior analyst recommends that other professional assistance (i.e., assessment, consultation or therapeutic intervention by other professionals) be sought Environmental Conditions that Hamper Implementation. If environmental conditions hamper implementation of the behavior analytic program, the behavior analyst seeks to eliminate the environmental constraints, or identifies in writing the obstacles to doing so. (Bailey & Burch, 2011)

28 Limiting Conditions? What are some examples of conditions that may impede the progress of an intervention? (Bailey & Burch, 2011)

29

30 Why is clarity important? Maybe parents and consumers will ask of this explanation & clarity from other professionals about the basis for their intervention. (Bailey & Burch, 2011)

31

32

33

34 References Bailey, J.S., & Burch, M. R. (2010). Twenty-five essential skills & strategies for the professional behavior analyst. New York: Routledge Publishing. Cooper, J., Heron, T., & Heward, W. (2007). Applied Behavior Analysis. New Jersey: Pearson Education. assessment.html (Bailey & Burch, 2011)


Download ppt "Chapter 8: Assessing Behavior Lindsey Gallagher Caldwell College June 6, 2012."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google