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Bringing Social Innovation and Value Creation through Community Social Enterprise Dr Sarah-Anne Munoz and Artur Steinerowski O4O team members Centre for.

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Presentation on theme: "Bringing Social Innovation and Value Creation through Community Social Enterprise Dr Sarah-Anne Munoz and Artur Steinerowski O4O team members Centre for."— Presentation transcript:

1 Bringing Social Innovation and Value Creation through Community Social Enterprise Dr Sarah-Anne Munoz and Artur Steinerowski O4O team members Centre for Rural Health, UHI, Inverness, UK

2 O4O – Older People for Older People NPP project Why older people? -Current perception of older people -Challenges in service provision -Difficulties in providing services in remote and rural areas Policy view on social enterprise Policy interest in social enterprise (not for profit social organisations); economic, social and environmental development Additional benefits e.g. participation, well-being, social capital; empowering communities; tackling social exclusion O4O and its background

3 Research questions and techniques Research questions -Can social innovation and added value be successfully generated by engaging communities in innovative business models? -What is the role of researchers in social enterprise creation? Research focus and research context -To test the feasibility of innovative organisational models in which older people provide services to other older people -Remote and rural communities from the Scottish Highlands Research techniques -Empirical research combining ethnographic and action research techniques

4 Community 1 - Oral history DVD - Development of community village hall as a business to generate income to support village services Community 2 - Informal lift sharing scheme - Community car scheme - Demand responsive service Community 3 - Community care hub Community 4 - Original idea of a neighbourly helping services changed into an enhancement of existing Council Handy Person scheme What happened in our communities

5 UHI Millennium Institute and The University of Aberdeen working in partnership Other communities develop services? O4O delivers services Models of social organisation established / case studiesToolkit Co-production process starts Identification of potential models of social organisation Community capacity & skills Business planning & feasibility studying Resources (local and external)Training Community Engagement Identification of NeedsBuilding trust / relationshipsInitiatives selected to take forward Project initiation Meet the communityGenerate confidence / enthusiasmDiscussion about O4O concept Process of social innovation

6 UHI Millennium Institute and The University of Aberdeen working in partnership Community action is important at all stages of the social innovation process Community Engagement The O4O project manager facilitated community engagement Project manager builds trust and identifies key citizens within the community Community needs to engage with concepts of co-design and co-production Community Entrepreneurship Community dialogue is important A collective process of needs recognition takes place Community comes together to initiate social enterprise The Role of Community Action and the Social Innovation Process

7 UHI Millennium Institute and The University of Aberdeen working in partnership An ‘external’ expert figure was often valued by community members and groups Community Perceptions of the ‘External’ Expert The external experts played an important role in catalysing social innovation Someone from ‘outside’ or a university is viewed as a credible expert/ leader The ‘External’ Expert for Rural Social Enterprise Development The external figure can be a positive force in generating social innovation There is a fine line between supporting the community and getting too involved Needs connection with, and distance from, the community The Role of the ‘External’ Expert

8 UHI Millennium Institute and The University of Aberdeen working in partnership Within the rural context, different kinds of legitimacy are central to social innovation Legitimacy with the Community Communities need to see social enterprises as legitimate service providers Embedding legitimacy within the community catalyses community social innovation Legitimacy with the Public Sector Public sector funding is particularly important in rural areas Need to see social enterprises as legitimate before commissioning from them If legitimacy is not embedded the viability of the enterprise can be jeopardised Building Discursive Legitimacy Competence in both civic and public sector discourses Building Different Levels of Legitimacy

9 UHI Millennium Institute and The University of Aberdeen working in partnership Grounding Organisational Structure in Local Appropriateness Tension within rural communities: translating existing voluntarism into more formalised participation Social enterprise model must negotiate this tension People are included AND excluded from informal helping Must create a balance between meeting need and damaging existing informal helping structures

10 Conclusions Social innovation and added value can be successfully generated by engaging communities in innovative business models -Social enterprises need to be recognised as a legitimate service provider by communities and service providers -The act of coalescing of a community group predicates the emergence of social innovation -External facilitators are essential to catalyse the social innovation process -The development of a relationship between communities and public sector providers is significant in order to develop innovative social businesses Sarah-Ann Munoz, Research Fellow, Centre for Rural Health, Artur Steinerowski, Research Assistant, Centre for Rural Health


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