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The Crisis Deepens Setting the Scene Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.468.

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Presentation on theme: "The Crisis Deepens Setting the Scene Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.468."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Crisis Deepens Setting the Scene Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.468

2 The Crisis Deepens Setting the Scene Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.468

3 Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.468 The Crisis Deepens Kansas-Nebraska Act

4 Proposed by Stephen A. Douglas from Illinois Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.468 The Crisis Deepens Kansas-Nebraska Act

5 Franklin PierceWinfield Scott vs. Lewis Cass James Buchanan William Marcy Stephen Douglas All tried to get the nomination for the DEMOCRATS Democrats Whigs Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.468 The Crisis Deepens The Election of 1852

6 Franklin Pierce Winfield Scott Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.468 The Crisis Deepens The Election of 1852

7 Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.469 The Crisis Deepens Kansas-Nebraska Act Support for the Act

8 Franklin Pierce won the election of 1852 and became the 14th President of the United States. With President Pierce’s support, the Kansas-Nebraska Act passed through Congress. Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.469 The Crisis Deepens Support for the Act

9 Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.469 The Crisis Deepens Kansas-Nebraska Act

10 Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.469 The Crisis Deepens Kansas-Nebraska Act Northern Outrage

11 Missouri Compromise of 1820 Northerners felt that the issue of slavery in this territory (the Louisiana Purchase Territory) was already decided by the Missouri Compromise and it was decided that these lands would be free from slavery. To protest the passing of the Kansas- Nebraska Act, anti-slavery northerners openly challenged the Fugitive Slave Act. KANSAS- NEBRASKA ACT Repealed or overrode the Missouri Compromise of 1820 Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.468 The Crisis Deepens Kansas-Nebraska Act Northern Outrage

12 Chapter 16 section 3 Pg The Crisis Deepens The Crisis Turns Violent

13 Both groups, anti-slavery northerners and pro-slavery southerners began to move into the Kansas Territory hoping that it would become either free or slave when it joined the Union. Stephen Douglas - sponsor and supporter of the Kansas-Nebraska Act I hope that now settlers can peacefully decide on the issue of slavery. Chapter 16 section 3 The Crisis Deepens The Crisis Turns Violent Pg

14 “Border Ruffians” Pro-slavery “gangs” rode into Kansas from across the border of nearby Missouri to harass, pick fights with, and hopefully scare anti-slavery families out of Kansas. Chapter 16 section 3 The Crisis Deepens The Crisis Turns Violent Pg

15 Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.470 Kansas-Nebraska Act The Crisis Turns Violent Two Governments

16 Two Governments in Kansas Kansas held an election in 1855 to set up a government for the territory so it could become a state. During the election, hundreds of “Border Ruffians” from Missouri came to Kansas and voted illegally in the election allowing a pro-slavery government to be elected. The pro-slavery government passed two laws right away: One saying people could be put to death for helping slaves escape and a second making speaking out against slavery a crime. Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.470 Kansas-Nebraska Act The Crisis Turns Violent Two Governments

17 Kansas-Nebraska Act The Crisis Turns Violent Two Governments in Kansas Anti-slavery settlers who claimed the election was corrupt refused to accept the laws and elected their own government. The two opposing governments both claimed to be in charge of Kansas. This led to violence. Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.470

18 Kansas-Nebraska Act The Crisis Turns Violent Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.470

19 Kansas-Nebraska Act The Crisis Turns Violent “Bleeding Kansas” John Brown, his 4 sons, and two other men rode to the town of Pottawatomie Creek and took revenge against pro-slavery settlers by dragging 5 of them from their beds while they were sleeping and murdering them. Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.470

20 Kansas-Nebraska Act The Crisis Turns Violent Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.470

21 Kansas-Nebraska Act The Crisis Turns Violent “Bleeding Kansas” The violence became even worse after the contested elections held in Again, pro-slavery ruffians were coming across the border. In 1856, they raided the town of Lawrence, Kansas and destroyed homes and smashed the printing-press of the a Free-Soil newspaper. Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.470

22 Violence in the Senate Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.470

23 Violence in the Senate Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.470

24 Violence in the Senate Senator Charles Sumner (an abolistionist) spoke out against slavery and harshly criticized Senator Andrew Butler. A few days later, Andrew Butler’s nephew, Congressman Preston Brooks, marched into the Senate and beat Sumner with a heavy cane. Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.470

25 Violence in the Senate Southerners sent canes to Preston Brooks showing their support for what he did. Northerners were outraged at the act and said that this was evidence that slavery led to violence in America. Preston Brooks was forced to resign from the House of Representatives but was later re-elected to office before dying at age 37. Charles Sumner slowly recovered and returned to the Senate to serve for a total of 18 years. Further dividing the nation Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.470

26 The Dred Scott Case Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.471

27 The Dred Scott Case Dred Scott was a slave owned by Dr. John Emerson. He was enslaved in Missouri for many years. His owner moved to Illinois and took Dred Scott with him. (Illinois was a free state.) His owner then took Dred Scott with him to the Wisconsin territory where slavery was also not allowed. Before his death, Dred Scott’s owner took him back to Missouri (a slave state). Dred Scott Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.471

28 The Dred Scott Case After Dr. Emerson’s death, Dred Scott and his wife Harriet with the help of anti-slavery lawyers filed a lawsuit claming that they were free because they had been taken into states where slavery was illegal. Dred Scott and his wife Harriet Scott Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.471

29 The Dred Scott Case Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.471

30 The Supreme Court decided: Dred Scott could not file a lawsuit because he was a slave, not a citizen and had no access to the courts. Slaves were property and just like any other property, just taking it into a free state does not mean it is no longer your property. Congress does not have the power to outlaw slavery in any territory (since it’s not a power given in the Constitution). U.S. Supreme Court Case Dred Scott v. Sanford * Sanford was the lawyer for Mrs. Emerson (Dr. Emerson’s wife) who felt she still owned the Scotts Chief Justice Roger B. Taney Dred Scott Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.471 The Crisis Deepens The Dred Scott Case

31 Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.472 The Crisis Deepens The Dred Scott Case The Nation Reacts

32 Northerners were shocked and angry. They hoped that the decision would have more whites join the abolitionist movement. Southerners were happy since this is what they had been saying all along. Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.472 The Crisis Deepens The Dred Scott Case The Nation Reacts

33 The Crisis Deepens The Dred Scott Case The Nation Reacts Fredrick Douglas Former Slave & Abolitionist This infamous decision maintains that slaves … are property in the same sense that horses, sheep, and swine are property …that [people] of African descent are not and cannot be citizens of the United States. All I ask of the American people is that they live up to the Constitution, adopt its principles, [take in] its spirit, and enforce its provisions. When this is done…liberty…will become the inheritance of all the inhabitants of this highly favored country. Chapter 16 section 3 Pg.472


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