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Findings from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), 2000-2005 Hollie Clark MPH, Tanya Williams MPH, LaTreace Harris MPH, Brian Morrow.

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Presentation on theme: "Findings from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), 2000-2005 Hollie Clark MPH, Tanya Williams MPH, LaTreace Harris MPH, Brian Morrow."— Presentation transcript:

1 Findings from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), Hollie Clark MPH, Tanya Williams MPH, LaTreace Harris MPH, Brian Morrow MA, Norma Harris PhD

2 Overview Description of PRAMS Present results for PRAMS states on selected indicators –2005 prevalence estimates –Trends ( )

3 What is PRAMS? Ongoing, population-based, state-based surveillance of women delivering live infants Self-reported data on maternal behaviors and experiences before, during, and after pregnancy Initiated in 1987 in 5 states and Washington, DC Currently operates in 37 states, New York City and the South Dakota tribal-state collaborative project

4 Objectives of PRAMS To collect and analyze high quality population-based data To translate data into useable information To increase state capacity

5 PRAMS Methodology Standardized data collection protocol Sample of women having a recent live birth Mailed questionnaire Telephone follow-up for non-responders

6 States Participating in PRAMS, 2007 WY WISDT PA TN MO VA DE MA Included in analysis Excluded from analysis

7 Data Analysis Analyzed data for 7 indicators 2005 prevalence estimates by state Trend data from for those states & indicators available for entire time period

8 Multivitamin Use HP 2010: 16-16a Increase the proportion of non-pregnant women who consume at least 400 μg of folic acid each day to 80% PRAMS: In the month before you got pregnant with your new baby, how many times a week did you take a multivitamin? −‘every day of the week’

9 Prevalence of Daily Multivitamin Use during the Month Prior to Pregnancy, PRAMS 2005 Range: WV 20.6 – NJ 39.5HP 2010 Goal: 80%

10 Prevalence of Daily Multivitamin Use during the Month Prior to Pregnancy, PRAMS Significant increases were observed for Hawaii, Nebraska, North Carolina, Utah, Alaska, New Mexico, and Oklahoma.

11 Intended Pregnancy HP 2010: 9-1 Increase the proportion of pregnancies that are intended to 70 percent PRAMS: Thinking back to just before you got pregnant, how did you feel about becoming pregnant? −Intended= You wanted to be pregnant ‘sooner’ or ‘then’

12 Prevalence of Intended Pregnancies Among Women Having a Live Birth, PRAMS 2005 Range: SC 50.4 – NY 67.2HP 2010 Goal: 70%

13 Physical Abuse HP 2010: Reduce the rate of physical assault by current or former intimate partners to 3.3 physical assaults per 1,000 persons aged 12 years and older PRAMS : During the 12 months before you got pregnant, did your husband or partner push, hit, slap, kick, choke, or physically hurt you in any other way? −‘Yes’

14 Prevalence of Physical Abuse by Husband or Partner During the 12 Months Before Pregnancy, PRAMS 2005 Range: NJ 1.8 – AR 7.2HP 2010 Goal:.33%

15 Prevalence of Physical Abuse by Husband or Partner During the 12 Months Before Pregnancy, PRAMS Significant decreases were observed for New Mexico, Alaska, Oklahoma, Hawaii, Florida, and Washington.

16 Prenatal Care During the 1 st trimester HP 2010: 16-6a Increase the proportion of pregnant women who receive early prenatal care beginning in the first trimester of pregnancy to 90 percent of live births PRAMS : How many weeks or months pregnant were you when you had your first visit for prenatal care? − _____ weeks or _____ months

17 Prevalence of Entry into Prenatal Care During the First Trimester, PRAMS 2005 Range: AR NY 86.7HP 2010 Goal: 90%

18 Prevalence of Entry into Prenatal Care During the First Trimester, PRAMS Significant increases were observed for New York, Nebraska, Illinois, Oklahoma, and New Mexico, and a significant decrease was observed for North Carolina.

19 Abstinence from Smoking During the Last 3 Months of Pregnancy HP 2010: 16-17c Increase abstinence from cigarette smoking in the past month among pregnant women to 99 percent PRAMS : In the last 3 months of your pregnancy, how many cigarettes or packs of cigarettes did you smoke on an average day? −I didn’t smoke

20 Prevalence of Abstinence from Cigarette Smoking During the Last 3 Months of Pregnancy, PRAMS 2005 Range: WV 68.1 – NYC 95HP 2010 Goal: 99%

21 Prevalence of Abstinence from Cigarette Smoking During the Last 3 Months of Pregnancy, PRAMS A significant increase was observed for Utah, and a significant decrease was observed for West Virginia.

22 Abstinence from Alcohol During the Last 3 Months of Pregnancy HP 2010: 16-17a Increase abstinence from alcohol in the past month among pregnant women to 95 percent PRAMS : During the last 3 months of your pregnancy, how many alcoholic drinks did you have in an average week? −I didn’t drink then

23 Prevalence of Abstinence from Alcohol During the Last 3 Months of Pregnancy, PRAMS 2005 Range: CO 88.9 – UT, WV 97.1HP 2010 Goal: 95%

24 Prevalence of Abstinence from Alcohol During the Last 3 Months of Pregnancy, PRAMS Significant decreases were observed for West Virginia, Nebraska, South Carolina, North Carolina, Arkansas, and Florida.

25 Back to Sleep HP 2010: Increase the percentage of healthy full-term infants who are put down to sleep on their backs to 70 percent PRAMS: How do you most often lay your baby down to sleep now? −On his or her back

26 Prevalence of Healthy Full-term Infants who are put to Sleep on their Backs, PRAMS 2005 Range: AR 54.1 – WA 82.4HP 2010 Goal: 70%

27 Prevalence of Healthy Full-term Infants who are put to Sleep on their Backs, PRAMS and Arkansas. Significant increases were observed for Washington, Maine, Colorado, Alaska, Nebraska, Hawaii, Illinois, New Mexico, North Carolina, West Virginia, Oklahoma, Florida, and Arkansas.

28 Summary Many states met HP 2010 goals for: –Abstinence from alcohol (12 states) –Placing infants to sleep on their backs (13 states)

29 Summary (Cont.) No states met HP 2010 goals for: –Multivitamin use –Intended pregnancy 3 states had a prevalence of at least 65% –Physical abuse prior to pregnancy –Entry into prenatal care during the first trimester 4 states had a prevalence of at least 85% –Abstinence from smoking 2 states had a prevalence of 95%

30 Limitations Minor differences exist between HP 2010 objectives and some PRAMS indicators –Folic acid consumption –Abstinence from smoking and from alcohol States without 6 consecutive years of data excluded from trend analyses

31 Conclusions Value of state-based data –Progress toward Healthy People objectives and Title V performance measures –Program planning –Policy decisions

32 CDC PRAMS Reports PRAMS Surveillance Reports –Available since 1995 –Current year prevalence data for over 20 indicators –Trend data by state MMWR Surveillance Summaries –Reports from 1997, 1999, 2000, 2004, 2006, 2007 Reports available on the PRAMS website

33 Acknowledgment: PRAMS Working Group Alabama – Albert Woolbright, PhD ; Alaska - Kathy Perham-Hester, MS, MPH; Arkansas - Mary McGehee, PhD; Colorado - Alyson Shupe, PhD; Delaware – Charlon Kroelinger, PhD; Florida – Jamie Fairclough, MPH; Georgia - Carol Hoban, MS, MPH; Hawaii - Sharon Sirling; Illinois – Theresa Sandidge, MA; Louisiana - Joan Wightkin; Maine - Kim Haggan; Maryland - Diana Cheng, MD; Massachusetts - Hafsatou Diop, MD, MPH; Michigan – Violanda Grigorescu, MD, MSPH; Minnesota - Jan Jernell; Mississippi – Vernesia Wilson, MPH; Missouri - Venkata Garikapaty, MSc, MS, PhD, MPH; Montana - JoAnn Dotson; Nebraska - Jennifer Severe- Oforah; New Jersey - Lakota Kruse, MD; New Mexico - Eirian Coronado; New York State - Anne Radigan-Garcia; New York City - Candace Mulready-Ward, MPH; North Carolina - Paul Buescher, PhD; North Dakota Sandra Anseth; Ohio – Lily Tatham; Oklahoma –Dick Lorenz; Oregon – Kenneth Rosenberg, MD; Pennsylvania - Kenneth Huling; Rhode Island – Sam Viner-Brown, PhD; South Carolina - Jim Ferguson, DrPH; South Dakota – Christine Rinki, MPH; Texas – Eric Miller, PhD; Tennessee - David Law, PhD; Utah – Laurie Baksh; Vermont - Peggy Brozicevic; Virginia – Michelle White; Washington - Linda Lohdefinck; West Virginia – Melissa Baker, MA; Wisconsin - Katherine Kvale, PhD; Wyoming - Angi Crotsenberg; CDC PRAMS Team, Applied Sciences Branch, Division of Reproductive Health


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