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Principles to Actions: Ensuring Mathematical Success for All Dr. DeAnn Huinker ~ University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee New major NCTM Publication!!

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Presentation on theme: "Principles to Actions: Ensuring Mathematical Success for All Dr. DeAnn Huinker ~ University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee New major NCTM Publication!!"— Presentation transcript:

1 Principles to Actions: Ensuring Mathematical Success for All Dr. DeAnn Huinker ~ University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee New major NCTM Publication!!

2 Session Overview  Background and Rationale  Guiding Principles  Effective Mathematics Teaching Practices  Next Professional Steps and Actions

3 Session Learning Goal We are learning to: Consider how we, as leaders, can use Principles to Actions to support improvement toward excellent mathematics programs and effective teaching and learning of mathematics.

4 Background

5 Principles to Actions What it will take to turn the opportunity of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics and other rigorous standards and expectations for student learning into a reality in every classroom, school, and district? NCTM undertook a major initiative to define and describe the principles and actions, including specific teaching practices, that are essential for a high-quality mathematics education for all students.

6 Principles to Actions Writing Team Robert Q. Berry III, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA Frederick L. Dillon, Strongsville City Schools, Ohio Matthew R. Larson Lincoln Public Schools, Nebraska Miriam A. Leiva University of North Carolina at Charlotte W. Gary Martin, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama Margaret S. Smith, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Steven Leinwand American Institutes for Research, D.C. Daniel J. Brahier Bowling Green State University, Ohio DeAnn Huinker University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee

7 Principles to Actions Offers guidance to teachers, mathematics coaches, administrators, parents, and policymakers.

8 Principles to Actions Identifies 8 research-based, core essential Mathematics Teaching Practices (MTP). Describes conditions, structures, policies that support the MTP. Identifies obstacles, unproductive and productive beliefs, that must be understood, acknowledged, addressed by all stakeholders. Builds on NCTM’s standards and supports implementation of the Common Core. Encourages teachers to engage students in mathematical thinking, reasoning, and sense making. Aims to significantly strengthen teaching and learning in order to attain higher levels of math achievement for all students.

9 NCTM Website: Principles to Actions  Executive Summary (pdf)  News release  Reflection Guide (pdf) (Tasks/questions, Connections to other MTP, Applications to practice) ... and more resources coming (e.g., toolkit, slides... ebook: $4.99 ($3.99 for NCTM members)

10 Guiding Principles

11 Teaching and LearningAccess and EquityCurriculumTools and TechnologyAssessmentProfessionalism Guiding Principles for School Mathematics Guiding Principles for School Mathematics

12 Read Turn and talk Key messages for teachers Key messages for administrators Guiding Principles Turn to the list on the inside front cover.

13 Key Messages?

14 Teaching and Learning Principle

15 Guiding Principle: Teaching and Learning An excellent mathematics program requires effective teaching that engages students in meaningful learning through individual and collaborative experiences that promote their ability to make sense of mathematical ideas and reason mathematically.

16 Obstacles

17 Unproductiv e Beliefs Productive Beliefs “It is important to note that these beliefs should not be viewed as good or bad. Instead, beliefs should be understood as unproductive when they hinder the implementation of effective instructional practice or limit student access to important mathematics content and practices.” (NCTM, 2014, p. 11)

18 Read the “Beliefs” table on page 11 Turn and talk Share your reactions Beliefs about Teaching and Learning Mathematics

19 NCTM’s Core Set of Effective Mathematics Teaching Practices

20 Effective teaching is the non-negotiable core that ensures that all students learn mathematics at high levels. Overarching Message Effective teaching requires a range of professional structures, supports, and actions at state, district, school, and classroom levels.

21 Visualize for a moment, the best math lesson you ever taught. “Best Lesson Ever”  What made it so successful?  What were you the teacher doing?  What were students doing?  What mathematics was being learned?

22 Establish math goals to focus learning Implement tasks that promote reasoning & problem solving Use and connect mathematical representations Facilitate meaningful mathematical discourse Pose purposeful questions Support productive struggle in learning mathematics Build procedural fluency from conceptual understanding Elicit & use evidence of student thinking Mathematics Teaching Practices

23 Establish math goals to focus learning Implement tasks that promote reasoning & problem solving Use and connect mathematical representations Facilitate meaningful mathematical discourse Pose purposeful questions Support productive struggle in learning mathematics Build procedural fluency from conceptual understanding Elicit & use evidence of student thinking Mathematics Teaching Practices

24 Student Learning of mathematics... “depends fundamentally on what happens inside the classroom as teachers and learners interact over the curriculum.” (Ball & Forzani, 2011, p. 17) Action: To work together as a profession toward implementation of a common set of high-leverage practices that underlie effective teaching “those practices at the heart of the work of teaching that are most likely to affect student learning.” (Ball & Forzani, 2010, p. 45)

25 Read, then turn and talk. Aha!! Yes!! Identify a MTP as an area of strength. Identify a MTP that needs attention. Mathematics Teaching Practices (MTP) Turn to the MTP list on the inside back cover.

26 Establish math goals to focus learning Implement tasks that promote reasoning & problem solving Use and connect mathematical representations Facilitate meaningful mathematical discourse Pose purposeful questions Support productive struggle in learning mathematics Build procedural fluency from conceptual understanding Elicit & use evidence of student thinking Mathematics Teaching Practices

27 Mathematics Teaching Practices  Statement of the MTP  Discussion of the research evidence  Classroom illustration  Teacher and student actions

28 MTP1. Establish math goals to focus learning. Effective teaching of mathematics establishes clear goals for the mathematics that students are learning, situates goals within learning progressions, and uses the goals to guide instructional decisions. Daro, Mosher, & Corcoran, 2011; Hattie, 2009; Hiebert, Morris, Berk, & Jensen., 2007; Wiliam, 2011 Pages 12-16: Skim the discussion and illustration. Read “Teacher and Student” actions (p. 16); consider the potential of these tables for your work as leaders.

29 MTP1. Establish math goals to focus learning. What are teachers doing?What are students doing? Establishing clear goals that articulate the mathematics that students are learning as a result of instruction in a lesson, over a series of lessons, or throughout a unit. Identifying how the goals fit within a mathematics learning progression. Discussing and referring to the mathematical purpose and goal of a lesson during instruction to ensure that students understand how the current work contributes to their learning. Using the mathematics goals to guide lesson planning and reflection and to make in-the-moment decisions during instruction. Engaging in discussions of the mathematical purpose and goals related to their current work in the mathematics classroom (e.g., What are we learning? Why are we learning it?) Using the learning goals to stay focused on their progress in improving their understanding of mathematics content and proficiency in using mathematical practices. Connecting their current work with the mathematics that they studied previously and seeing where the mathematics is going. Assessing and monitoring their own understanding and progress toward the mathematics learning goals.

30 Taking Action

31 As teacher leaders within your schools and districts, brainstorm ways you might use Principles to Actions with other teachers and administrators. Taking Action section, pages , with specific recommendations for (1) policymakers and district leaders; (2) principals, coaches, other school leaders, and (3) teachers.

32 Session Learning Goal We are learning to: Consider how we, as leaders, can use Principles to Actions to support improvement toward excellent mathematics programs and effective teaching and learning of mathematics.

33 Thank You! DeAnn Huinker University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee


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