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At-Risk Afterschool Meals Educational Summit Omaha Mayor’s Office.

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Presentation on theme: "At-Risk Afterschool Meals Educational Summit Omaha Mayor’s Office."— Presentation transcript:

1 At-Risk Afterschool Meals Educational Summit Omaha Mayor’s Office

2 Omaha Mayor’s Office Agenda  Hunger in Nebraska  Overview of USDA Programs  Breakfast, Summer, Fruit & Veggies Programs  CLC’s  Applications  Funding Options

3 Omaha Mayor’s Office Omaha Mayor’s Office And 16 million kids in America aren't getting the food they need. Childhood hunger is widespread Nearly one in five children in Nebraska live in households that struggle to put food on the table. They may look no different than other children; child hunger in America is often invisible. They are hurting, just the same. Source: Share our Strength Hungry Children Suffer

4 Omaha Mayor’s Office Omaha Mayor’s Office Childhood hunger is devastating Hungry kids are more likely to experience serious short- and long-term health issues. They tend to have trouble learning and are more prone to behavioral and emotional problems. Source: Share our Strength Impacts of Childhood Hunger

5 Source: Share our Strength That child who doesn’t have enough to eat isn’t going to do as well in school. And is likely to get sick more often. She’s less likely to graduate from high school and go on to college, which will have a negative impact on her economic future. If this happens, then twenty years from now, she’s much less likely to be able to earn enough to feed her family.

6 Omaha Mayor’s Office Omaha Mayor’s Office Overview of USDA Programs  CACFP  Afterschool Program (At-Risk Component)  NSLP (National School Lunch Program)  Breakfast Program  Fresh Fruit and Vegetable  Summer Food Service Program

7 Omaha Mayor’s Office CACFP and the At-Risk Component What is the Child and Adult Care Food Program?  Federally funded nutrition program  Provides reimbursements to programs that serve snacks or meals to children outside of school hours during the regular school year What is the At-Risk Component?  1 of 2 kinds of CACFP Eligibility 1. Income eligibility (General CACFP): Based on household income. Reimbursement rate (free, reduced, or paid) for each individual child. 2. Area eligibility (At-risk CACFP): Based on program location. Programs in low income areas can receive the “free meals” reimbursement rate for all children served. ($2.86 for meals or super snacks, $0.78 for snacks.)

8 Omaha Mayor’s Office CACFP At-Risk Eligibility  Weekends, holidays, or vacations during the school year.  Youth aged 18 or younger  Enrichment activities  Health and safety standards  Located in the attendance area of a public school where at least 50% of students receive free or reduced lunch. Note: Eligible programs may be operated by a nonprofit, public entity, or for-profit center, though for-profit centers must meet additional requirements (talk to the NDE for specifics).

9 Omaha Mayor’s Office Omaha Mayor’s Office National School Lunch Program (NSLP)  What year was the National School Lunch Program established?  NSLP operates in over 100,000 public and nonprofit private schools and residential child care institutions.  How many children were served in the first year? How many were served in 2011?  How much did the program cost in the first year? How much did it cost in 2011?  Does offer snacks  Free/Reduced Levels  FREE at or below 130 percent of the poverty level  REDUCED between 130 percent and 185 percent of the poverty level (students can be charged no more than 40 cents)  PAIDover 185% of poverty (still subsidized)

10 Omaha Mayor’s Office Omaha Mayor’s Office School Breakfast Program (SBP)  Operates similarly to NSLP  Must meet meal pattern requirements (anticipate changes next year)  Must offer free or reduced price breakfasts to eligible children  When did the program begin? (pilot program first)  How many children were served in 1970? How many were served in 2011?  How much did the program cost in 1970? How much did it cost in 2011?

11 Omaha Mayor’s Office Omaha Mayor’s Office NSLP vs. Breakfast Number of Children Served Millions

12 Omaha Mayor’s Office Omaha Mayor’s Office Billions $ Program Costs NSLP vs. Breakfast

13 Omaha Mayor’s Office Omaha Mayor’s Office School Breakfast in Nebraska  Rank 49 th out of all states and District of Columbia  Increased by more than 3600 in vs  $9.2M left on the table for the State of Nebraska Nebraska School Breakfast Challenge “There is a direct correlation between food insecurity and academic performance.” (Nicola Edwards, dietician and food policy expert at California Food Policy Advocates) Significant benefits associated with breakfast Improved educational performance Improved attendance and behavior Contributes to long-term health and well-being for kids Contributes to decreased obesity

14 Omaha Mayor’s Office Omaha Mayor’s Office School Breakfast – What Can you Do?  Become a breakfast advocate!  Make sure your local school is serving the best type of breakfast Encourage administration / teachers Share information about the Nebraska School Breakfast Challenge Invite NSBC Consultants to present at local school 14

15 Omaha Mayor’s Office Omaha Mayor’s Office Summer Food Service Program (SFSP)  When was the first pilot program? When was it a separate program?  How many children were served in 2009 nationally?  Program cost in 1980? In 2009?  FNS administers SFSP at the Federal Level  NDE Nutrition Services administers  Run by approved sponsors (school districts, local government agencies, camps, private nonprofit organizations);  Many sites also provide educational, enrichment and recreational activities Children 18 and younger may receive free meals and snacks

16 Omaha Mayor’s Office Omaha Mayor’s Office Summer Meals  Nebraska underperforms most states in utilization of USDA summer meals program Approximately 10% participation How many sites?  Host a summer site Assistance provided on getting started  Help generate awareness  HFH website   Text freefood to

17 Omaha Mayor’s Office Omaha Mayor’s Office Summer Food Service Program (SFSP)  Addressing Barriers  Transportation  Resources / Coordination  Weather  Funding  Partners and Options  Other Community Partners  Mobile  School Sponsor (finding a sponsor)  Programming / Enrichment partners

18 Omaha Mayor’s Office Omaha Mayor’s Office Fresh Fruit & Vegetable Program  The Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 authorized the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Pilot in 4 states and 1 Indian Tribal Organization (Zuni, New Mexico)  As a result of the Program’s popularity, the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004 added 4 more states,10 schools in South Dakota’s Pine Ridge Reservation, and 8 schools in Arizona’s Tribal Council  Program is nationwide in selected schools in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.  Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) administers the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (FFVP) at the national level.  Department of Education Nutrition Services administers locally  Important catalyst for change in our efforts to combat childhood obesity  Successful in introducing school children to a variety of produce that they otherwise might not have the opportunity to sample.

19 Omaha Mayor’s Office Omaha Mayor’s Office 21 st Century Community Learning Centers  21st CCLC sites are federally-funded through a competitive grant program  Funding is provided by the Federal government through the No Child Left Behind Act and is administered by the Nebraska Department of Education  The three goals for this grant program are to: improve student learning performance in one or more core academic areas, increase social benefits and positive behavioral changes, and increase family/community engagement to support student education.  Must serve students who attend schools with 40% eligible for Free or reduced-cost meals in  For more information

20 Omaha Mayor’s Office Omaha Mayor’s Office Applications  NSLP, BSP and afterschool snacks – same application (school programs)  SFSP has a separate application  CACFP has a separate application  At-risk afterschool (snacks to meals) We can assist with finding the right program for your needs and making sure you have the right contacts.

21 Omaha Mayor’s Office Omaha Mayor’s Office Funding Options  CHAMP Mini-Grants (at-risk afterschool)  Hunger Free Heartland (breakfast, summer and at-risk afterschool)  Midwest Dairy / Fuel Up to Play 60  Other grant opportunities on HFH website

22 Omaha Mayor’s Office Omaha Mayor’s Office Q&A

23 Omaha Mayor’s Office Omaha Mayor’s Office National School Lunch Program (NSLP)  Established under the National School Lunch Act, signed by President Harry Truman in 1946  Operates in over 100,000 public and nonprofit private schools and residential child care institutions  Serves 31M children (7.1M children participated )  In 2011, total program cost was $11.1B (in 1947 it was $70M)  Nutritionally balanced, low-cost or free lunches  Local School Food Authorities set their own prices for full-price (Paid) meals but must operate their meal services as non-profit programs.  FREE at or below 130 percent of the poverty level  REDUCED between 130 percent and 185 percent of the poverty level (students can be charged no more than 40 cents)  PAIDover 185% of poverty (meals are still subsidized to some extent)  In 1998, Congress expanded the NSLP to include reimbursement for snacks in afterschool educational and enrichment programs  Afterschool snacks are provided to children on the same income eligibility basis as school meals

24 Omaha Mayor’s Office Omaha Mayor’s Office NSLP Reimbursements  Reimbursements for each Lunch served  Free$2.86  Reduced$2.46  Paid$0.27 Note: SFA’s in compliance with updated meal requirements receive an additional $0.06 for each meal served  Reimbursements for each Snack served  Free$0.78  Reduced$0.39  Paid$0.07  Schools are entitled to receive USDA ‘entitlement’ foods at a value of cents for each meal service in FY 2012/2013; can also get “bonus” USDA

25 Omaha Mayor’s Office Omaha Mayor’s Office School Breakfast Program (SBP)  Provides cash assistance to States to operate nonprofit breakfast programs in schools and residential childcare institutions  Began as a pilot in 1966; made permanent in 1975  Operates similarly to NSLP  Must meet meal pattern requirements (anticipate changes this next year)  Must offer free or reduced price breakfasts to eligible children  Reimbursements for each breakfast served (non-severe need - >40% of F/R)  Free$1.55  Reduced$1.25  Paid$0.27  Participation / Cost  Nationwide: over 12.1M daily (500K children in 1970)  $3B in 2011 vs. $10.8M in 1970


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